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NEW Programming from TCM - TCM Musical Matinee hosted by Dave Karger


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  • yanceycravat changed the title to NEW Programming from TCM - TCM Musical Matinee hosted by Dave Karger
12 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Anyone else make note of the ads for the Dave Karger hosted franchise, TCM Musical Matinee?

Thoughts?

 

 

 

New programming and anything else that indicates TCM is not about to shut down is good news to me. They wouldn't likely be advertising this new musical series — or their 2023 film festival — if that goon Zaslav at Warner Bros. Discovery was about to pull the plug on the whole operation.

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2 hours ago, Barton_Keyes said:

New programming and anything else that indicates TCM is not about to shut down is good news to me. They wouldn't likely be advertising this new musical series — or their 2023 film festival — if that goon Zaslav at Warner Bros. Discovery was about to pull the plug on the whole operation.

I was thinking along the same lines when I saw the promo for Dave’s new musical segment.  At least they’re not cutting back on programming!  Good luck to Dave — I hope he uses Eddie Muller as a model for how to introduce these musicals.

I know that some folks don’t think the hosts add much, but I’ve always disagreed.  You only have to look at Fox Movie Channel to see the difference.  There, they’re just showing a bunch of miscellaneous movies — often very good movies — with no additional information or context.  The TCM approach is a much richer experience.  Sure, not every host intro is up to the level of Eddie Muller’s Noir Alley, but they always add something.  I may already know the stuff in a given intro, but there’s bound to be some viewers who are hearing the information for the first time.

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Hey, BingFan, your mention of Fox Movie Channel started some old gears turning in my head -- not the ones I grease very often, unfortunately.  But I remember many years ago when the channel was up for maybe just a short while, that a guy named Tom Rothman (it took me most of the night last night to come up with the name) played host to the classic 20th Century Fox movies.  He was quite personable and as a studio executive so engulfed in the production process.  

He told one story in his introduction to the movie "Suspiria" that I recall.  I can't do it any justice; but the nuts and bolts were that he visited a movie set once when he was very young and saw a girl he fell in love with.  He knew right then he was going to marry her, and some years later saw her on the set of "Suspiria." Eventually he and Jessica Harper became man and wife.  

Ok, I've completely butchered this story, but I do remember it from a time when another movie channel used hosts to personalize the viewing experience and give more detailed background about the film itself.  The Fox experiment didn't last long, though -- maybe only a few months, really.  Shame, though, because this style of presenting movies can be quite effective and enjoyable.   

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18 hours ago, BingFan said:

I know that some folks don’t think the hosts add much, but I’ve always disagreed.  

I agree with you, BingFan!

The TCM hosts take me back to the days when movie hosts were commonplace on local television stations.  Those who grew up in the Philadelphia area and are of a certain age will likely remember Bernie Herman, who hosted an afternoon movie on WKBS Channel 48.

And if a station didn't have an on-screen host, then they usually had an official title for the movie presentation, with an opening title sequence and an announcer introducing the film.  In Philadelphia, Channel 48 had "The 8 O'Clock Movie" and "Creature Double Feature", while Channel 29 ran movies in the overnight hours and called it "All Night Long" (accompanied by a snippet of the Lionel Ritchie song).  Channel 6 had their "Million Dollar Movie".  The three major networks did the same -- "The ABC Movie of the Week", "The CBS Wednesday Night Movie", and NBC's "Big Event" umbrella title come to mind.

And, of course, nearly every TV market had a horror movie host...

All of this created a sense that the airing of a movie was a special event and a shared experience.  Even though we knew it wasn't true, we felt on a certain level that the host was watching along with us.  And I think that movies tend to inspire curiosity.  When we watch them, we want to know more about them, and the information communicated by the hosts helps to satisfy that curiosity.

So I'm definitely pleased to see this new franchise on TCM.  I've never been a fan of musicals, although in recent years, I've developed an appreciation for them, so I like the idea of having a guided tour of the genre.

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1 hour ago, brianNH said:

Hey, BingFan, your mention of Fox Movie Channel started some old gears turning in my head -- not the ones I grease very often, unfortunately.  But I remember many years ago when the channel was up for maybe just a short while, that a guy named Tom Rothman (it took me most of the night last night to come up with the name) played host to the classic 20th Century Fox movies.  He was quite personable and as a studio executive so engulfed in the production process.  

He told one story in his introduction to the movie "Suspiria" that I recall.  I can't do it any justice; but the nuts and bolts were that he visited a movie set once when he was very young and saw a girl he fell in love with.  He knew right then he was going to marry her, and some years later saw her on the set of "Suspiria." Eventually he and Jessica Harper became man and wife.  

Ok, I've completely butchered this story, but I do remember it from a time when another movie channel used hosts to personalize the viewing experience and give more detailed background about the film itself.  The Fox experiment didn't last long, though -- maybe only a few months, really.  Shame, though, because this style of presenting movies can be quite effective and enjoyable.   

I never knew that Fox Movie Channel had once had a host — thanks for noting that!  Through the years, I’ve often checked FMC for movies that I want to see and/or record on DVD, because they show some very good Fox movies that rarely, if ever, make it to TCM (e.g., the 1933 version of State Fair, which took years to finally be shown on TCM).  I never did see Mr. Rothman as host, but I wonder if any of the recorded DVDs that I haven’t gotten around to watching yet might include him.

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1 hour ago, brianNH said:

 I remember many years ago when the channel was up for maybe just a short while, that a guy named Tom Rothman (it took me most of the night last night to come up with the name) played host to the classic 20th Century Fox movies.  He ... visited a movie set once when he was very young and saw a girl he fell in love with ... Jessica Harper became man and wife.

I was going to bring up the same thing.  Actually have that recorded here somewhere. 😆

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1 hour ago, PhillyCinephile said:

I agree with you, BingFan!

The TCM hosts take me back to the days when movie hosts were commonplace on local television stations.  Those who grew up in the Philadelphia area and are of a certain age will likely remember Bernie Herman, who hosted an afternoon movie on WKBS Channel 48.

And if a station didn't have an on-screen host, then they usually had an official title for the movie presentation, with an opening title sequence and an announcer introducing the film.  In Philadelphia, Channel 48 had "The 8 O'Clock Movie" and "Creature Double Feature", while Channel 29 ran movies in the overnight hours and called it "All Night Long" (accompanied by a snippet of the Lionel Ritchie song).  Channel 6 had their "Million Dollar Movie".  The three major networks did the same -- "The ABC Movie of the Week", "The CBS Wednesday Night Movie", and NBC's "Big Event" umbrella title come to mind.

And, of course, nearly every TV market had a horror movie host...

All of this created a sense that the airing of a movie was a special event and a shared experience.  Even though we knew it wasn't true, we felt on a certain level that the host was watching along with us.  And I think that movies tend to inspire curiosity.  When we watch them, we want to know more about them, and the information communicated by the hosts helps to satisfy that curiosity.

So I'm definitely pleased to see this new franchise on TCM.  I've never been a fan of musicals, although in recent years, I've developed an appreciation for them, so I like the idea of having a guided tour of the genre.

I didn’t grow up in Philadelphia, but your description definitely takes me back to what I saw on TV in Cincinnati, growing up there in the 60s and 70s.  

If I remember correctly, Cincinnati’s CBS station had a daily afternoon movie at 4pm, at just the right time to watch after school (if my mom didn’t shoo me outside to “get some fresh air”).  That’s where I first saw WW II-era movies featuring Abbott and Costello, big bands, and the Andrews Sisters.  Oddly for an afternoon show, they also featured some of the classic Universal horror movies of the 30s and 40s — I distinctly recall seeing movies like The Wolf Man and The Invisible Man on that afternoon movie program.  But I suppose those movies just happened to be part of the movie package that the station purchased from the films’ distributor.

I don’t remember Cincinnati’s afternoon program having a host (although it may have had an off-camera announcer), but Channel 19’s Saturday night horror program, called “Scream In,”  had a host (can’t remember his name) who wore a Dracula-type costume, but with a hat and long hair (it being the late 60s).  “Scream In” seemed to show mostly later-era horror movies, like Ray Milland in X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes, Boris Karloff in Die Monster, Die, and Japan’s The Attack of the Mushroom People.  I must have gotten my fill of horror movies from “Scream In” because I’ve  rarely watched them since then.  (One lasting effect: I can’t bear to eat mushrooms.)

I also saw a lot of movies on the network movie programs that you mention.  I remember seeing Lawrence of Arabia for the first time on the ABC Sunday Night Movie, and NBC’s Saturday Night At The Movies seemed to have outstanding movies like The Great Escape.

I have really happy memories of seeing a lot of very enjoyable movies on those local and network programs.  For me, TCM is a continuation of those old movie programs,  and they may be the reason I love movies so much now.  It’s not that I spent every moment sitting in front of the TV when I was growing up — I did typical kid things like playing baseball and football — but I always wanted to see more movies.  I still feel that way.

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6 hours ago, BingFan said:

I don’t remember Cincinnati’s afternoon program having a host (although it may have had an off-camera announcer), but Channel 19’s Saturday night horror program, called “Scream In,”  had a host (can’t remember his name) who wore a Dracula-type costume, but with a hat and long hair (it being the late 60s).  “Scream In” seemed to show mostly later-era horror movies, like Ray Milland in X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes, Boris Karloff in Die Monster, Die, and Japan’s The Attack of the Mushroom People.  I must have gotten my fill of horror movies from “Scream In” because I’ve  rarely watched them since then.  (One lasting effect: I can’t bear to eat mushrooms.)

Based on my reading, Ohio was the place for horror movie hosts, with Ghoulardi ruling the airwaves of Cleveland.

"Scream In" is on imdb.com!  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11378176/?ref_=ttmi_tt.  I love that the name is a play on "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In".  In Philly, we had Dr. Shock on Saturday afternoons, and in the 1980s and 1990s, we had Stella, who hosted "Saturday Night Dead", which aired at 1 AM on our local NBC affiliate, hence the show's title.

I have very specific memories and associations that I still carry with me as a result of watching films on broadcast television as a kid.  To this day, I'll think of certain films as belonging to a certain day of the week, a specific season of the year, or to a particular TV station.  The older I get, the more I realize that, for me, it's not just about the movies themselves, but about the experience of watching them, and how connected those experiences are to other life experiences.  

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3 minutes ago, PhillyCinephile said:

Based on my reading, Ohio was the place for horror movie hosts, with Ghoulardi ruling the airwaves of Cleveland.

"Scream In" is on imdb.com!  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11378176/?ref_=ttmi_tt.  I love that the name is a play on "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In".  In Philly, we had Dr. Shock on Saturday afternoons, and in the 1980s and 1990s, we had Stella, who hosted "Saturday Night Dead", which aired at 1 AM on our local NBC affiliate, hence the show's title.

I have very specific memories and associations that I still carry with me as a result of watching films on broadcast television as a kid.  To this day, I'll think of certain films as belonging to a certain day of the week, a specific season of the year, or to a particular TV station.  The older I get, the more I realize that, for me, it's not just about the movies themselves, but about the experience of watching them, and how connected those experiences are to other life experiences.  

Nearly every TV market had at least one horror movie host over the years.  Many got their start because their TV station bought a movie package from Universal Studios in the late 1950s called either Shock! or Shock Theater.  Most stations opted opted for a hosted show.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_Theater

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Just now, txfilmfan said:

Nearly every TV market had at least one horror movie host over the years.  Many got their start because their TV station bought a movie package from Universal Studios in the late 1950s called either Shock! or Shock Theater.  Most stations opted opted for a hosted show.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_Theater

23zacherle-obit-1-superJumbo.jpg

And this was our beloved host, in NYC.

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I hope Dave will consider doing the three 💫 A Star Is Born 💫 movies that are music inspired / musical. The first (1937), unfortunately, doesn't have much music-related, but personally, wouldn't mind if that was included as well ;)

Thanks, TCM, for another great programming decision!

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Entertainment Weekly just bit the dust this year so I wonder if Dave pitched this. His comment that Grease was his first musical sure made me feel old, but I think he's proven that he has a grasp of the long history of film. I know some think he's just a talking head and like to flag him for errors in intros he probably didn't write, but personally I can feel that his love of movies is real in the same way I could feel that Robert's was real. I hope he has some control over the films to be shown and the discussion about them, though I'm sure we'll see a lot of the usual suspects. I really liked his chats with Joan Collins when TCM featured her films last month, including a premier. I hope he'll consider binging on some guest experts, though he probably won't be allowed as much time as Eddie to do his set-ups. This is a good move (definitely in line with the TCM brand) and Saturday was probably the right choice.

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So there won't be anything new ... just the same films TCM has already shown dozens of times. Kinda like the old Sundays movies they used to show on Boston stations in the 1950s and various "late sows."

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9 minutes ago, UMO1982 said:

So there won't be anything new ... just the same films TCM has already shown dozens of times. Kinda like the old Sundays movies they used to show on Boston stations in the 1950s and various "late sows."

Yeah, I grew up with the Boston stations too. But I think the point was to set aside time for the family to watch and that's exactly what my family did. Maybe it's unrealistic all these years later; we'll see. I'm sure TCM will be "crunching the numbers" or whatever they call it now.

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32 minutes ago, DougieB said:

Yeah, I grew up with the Boston stations too. But I think the point was to set aside time for the family to watch and that's exactly what my family did. Maybe it's unrealistic all these years later; we'll see. I'm sure TCM will be "crunching the numbers" or whatever they call it now.

It's not a bad thing, just doesn't seem worth the effort except to give Karger a show.....

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On 10/31/2022 at 9:30 AM, UMO1982 said:

It's not a bad thing, just doesn't seem worth the effort except to give Karger a show.....

Practically (and maybe cynically) speaking, it also gives them a good outlet for MGM/Warner's product, though if they slight Twentieth Century-Fox I'll be p****d. But if they're going to do it, out of all the hosts Dave seems the one to do it. I don't think Ben's snark would work as well with musicals, where positivity generally reigns. The programming  may not work as well for jaded types like us who will have probably seen most of them, but musicals have always been one of the best lures into the classic film canon and it should appeal to people who are either curious to try something new and different or who want to renew a connection to something they once loved. Also, I'm curious to see what graphics they come up with because the TCM graphic artists are some of the best in the business, imho, and I hope they'll pull out all the stops for a regular slot for musicals. And, TCM, if you're listening (I know you're not.) I don't think you've ever shown Columbia's Three for the Show (1955) with Betty Grable, Jack Lemmon and Marge and Gower Champion. It's a fun, splashy (that word that always gets thrown around about musicals) story about theater folk with some clever/derivative "homages" to other film musicals like Kiss Me Kate and There's No Business Like Show Business, with Jack Cole choreography and Jean Louis costumes. Not to be sneezed at. I once saw it as part of a package from my cable provider so I know there's a fantastic wide-screen print out there. And I see from the promo there's a clip from Mitchell Leisen's The Girl Most Likely (RKO, 1957) with Jane Powell, Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes and Kaye Ballard and choreography by Gower Champion, so please. please. please, TCM, go beyond the easy-access MGM library for this series. 

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On 10/31/2022 at 8:50 AM, UMO1982 said:

So there won't be anything new ... just the same films TCM has already shown dozens of times. Kinda like the old Sundays movies they used to show on Boston stations in the 1950s and various "late sows."

Yep. YAWN. Just recycling the same old thing. With Karger as host with his vast encyclopedic knowledge of classic film? LMREO!!!

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