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Singer-songwriter Christine McVie (1943-2022)


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Christine McVie, the British-born singer and songwriter who became a superstar with the Grammy Award-winning rock group Fleetwood Mac, died today at the age of 79. Her family released a statement that said McVie had passed away after a short illness.

"On behalf of Christine McVie’s family, it is with a heavy heart we are informing you of Christine’s death," the statement said. "She passed away peacefully at hospital this morning, Wednesday, November 30th 2022, following a short illness. She was in the company of her family. We kindly ask that you respect the family’s privacy at this extremely painful time, and we would like everyone to keep Christine in their hearts and remember the life of an incredible human being, and revered musician who was loved universally. RIP Christine McVie."

The band also issued a statement about her death: "There are no words to describe our sadness at the passing of Christine McVie. She was truly one-of-a-kind, special and talented beyond measure. She was the best musician anyone could have in their band and the best friend anyone could have in their life. We were so lucky to have a life with her. Individually and together, we cherished Christine deeply and are thankful for the amazing memories we have. She will be so very missed."

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Born Christine Anne Perfect in the village of Bouth, Lancashire in northwest England, she began her musical exploits with British bands named Sounds of Blue and Chicken Shack. She married Fleetwood Mac co-founder and bassist John McVie in 1969 and became a member of his group. She released her first solo album, "Christine Perfect," in 1970.

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Fleetwood Mac went through several lineup changes during the 1970s, but the group enjoyed its greatest successes after the addition of the duo of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks in 1974.  The 1975 album "Fleetwood Mac" featured Christine's song "Over My Head," which rose to No. 20 on the Billboard pop chart. It was followed by her song "Say You Love Me," which peaked at No. 11.

Fleetwood Mac's monster 1977 album "Rumours" featured McVie's song "Don't Stop," which reached No. 3 on the Billboard pop chart in 1977. The song gained a second life 15 years later when it became the theme music for Bill Clinton's successful 1992 presidential campaign.

Another McVie song from "Rumours" was "You Make Loving Fun," which reached No. 11 on the Billboard pop chart in September 1977.

A memorable 1977 Rolling Stone magazine cover story (written by the future filmmaker Cameron Crowe) focused on the ups and downs in the band members' relationships. The McVies had divorced the year before, and Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks would break up as a romantic couples. Years later, it was revealed that Nicks was involved for a time with co-founder and drummer Mick Fleetwood.

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"Rumours" was named Album of the Year at the 20th Annual Grammy Awards held on February 23, 1978. The other nominees for 1977: "Aja" by  Steely Dan, "Hotel California" by the Eagles, "JT" by James Taylor and "Star Wars" by John Williams, conducting the London Symphony Orchestra.

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"Hold Me," written by McVie and the British singer-songwriter Robbie Patton, was the first single released from Fleetwood Mac's 1982 LP "Mirage."  It peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard pop chart.

McVie, like other members of Fleetwood Mac, occasionally worked on solo projects. Released in 1984, her second album "Christine McVie" included the song "Got a Hold on Me" -- which peaked at No. 10 on Billboard's pop chart.

The 1987 Fleetwood Mac album "Tango in the Night" featured the song "Little Lies," written by McVie and her second husband, Eddy Quintela (they divorced in 2003). It was No. 1 on Billboard Adult Contemporary chart for four weeks and peaked at No. 4 on Billboard's pop chart.

 
Fleetwood Mac was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. Twenty-one years later, Nicks was inducted as a solo act -- the first female artist to be honored twice.
 
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Sorry to hear this.

Always preferred hearing Christine singing the leads over her fellow female Fleetwood Mac bandmate, Nicks. 

Especially loved her solo album recording of her song "Got a Hold on Me", and still always crank up the volume on it whenever it comes on my car's radio.

(...R.I.P., dear lady)

 

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This is presumably my final post on here. No time to resume my listing of January programming. Got home late tonight. This news really makes me sad. The Beatles will always be Number One with me, but Fleetwood Mac is my Number Two favorite band. The blend of those three singing voices was goosebump-inducing. Christine was always the "quiet Mac" next to megastar-witchy-sex bomb Stevie NIcks and prickly, irascible guitar genius Lindsey Buckingham , but she wrote beautiful songs and had a beautiful warm alto, I think. The next time I hear "Songbird", I will probably cry, but she could do the uptempo numbers too. I love, love, love "Hold Me", "Say You Love Me" (which first got the band worldwide airplay) and "You Make Loving Fun". RIP.

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