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Name Your Favorite Film Noir Characters...And Why


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Speaking of female characters, no one has mentioned Marie Allen (Eleanor Parker) *Caged* (1950).

 

Other standouts in the film include Moorehead, who gives a great performance (as an understanding warden) here and Hope Emerson's Evelyn Harper has probably been the role model for ruthless female prison guards ever since.

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Speaking of characters -- and I do mean "characters" -- who I don't think have been mentioned, here are five more I considered for my list:

 

Steve Morgan: *The Devil Thumbs a Ride*

Vincent Lubeck: *The Hoodlum* (The only extenuating circumstance is that Vincent Lubeck hasn't committed murder... yet!)

Sam Wild: *Born to Kill*

John Dillinger: *John Dillinger*

Jim Roland: *San Quentin*

 

Honorable Mention: Jack Stevens: *Female Jungle*

 

Why?...Lawrence Tierney, the only man who I could forgive for beating out Timothy Carey for the role of Joe Cabot in Reservoir Dogs, providing fear just by being in frame. Not bad -- well, actually very bad -- as Alton Benes, too.

 

Edited by: ChiO on Oct 28, 2009 10:06 AM

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Jeff is the force that drives OUT OF THE PAST, the exemplary movie of the genre. There are a couple I like better. But none represent the themes and characteristics more than this superb Tourneur film. Jeff is the one who pays for his choices. Cathy has nothing to lose. She's all greed and self service. Kirk Douglas is a reptile with a chin dimple. Jeff has changed over time. He's adopted a peaceful lifestyle, and has grown from it. But that one life altering decision haunts him to the tragic end. The epitome of noir.

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HONORABLE MENTIONS: I struggled with who to pick. There are a lot of men who were really bad guys: Widmark, Tierney, Carey, Hayden, Walker, Kirk et al. In fact I like ?em all. They walked, ran and crawled those dark neon-lit streets like nobody's business. But these particular characters get my honorable mention: Richard Conte as Martin Rome: slippery and coquettish, and love that cleft chin...his charms run into Hope Emerson and she ain't budging; Dick Powell as Philip Marlowe: wry, shaken not stirred - didn?t know the boy tenor had it in him, but I should?ve known...he was married to Blondell; and Louis Calhern as Lon Emmerich: dashing, old money, never gets his hand dirty, great voice, cool customer; Sheldon Leonard in anything. Anything.

 

But I wanted to challenge myself to just pick five favorites. The following are characters that I?m compelled to watch. Some are old favorites of mine, some I?ve newly discovered. It?s hard for me to tell which comes first, the chicken or the egg. And I confess to you Miss G., folks, I probably cannot separate the character from the actor. But no one can deny that these actors' overall screen persona stand the test of time. Who, today, will we know sixty years from now:

 

(5). BOGART as Sam Spade in ?THE MALTESE FALCON.?

 

I love Sam Spade. No, he?s not big and beefy and brutal as some of the others, but it?s his wit and smarts I admire. I love his honor and ethics. He can pull the ladies with that devilish grin or he can pull a gun if you want to get tough about it. I love him because he?s the original, the first. I love him because he can be your pal or your lover. When he chucks Effie under the chin and says: ?You?re a good man, Sister,? I felt as though that he was spouting Byron. I love Sam Spade. He knows how to work the angles. And you know he?s got your back. He?ll do something about it. He?ll find your dog or your jewels or your husband. Hey, he?s so good maybe he could even find you a husband.

 

(4). ROBERT RYAN as Jim Wilson in ?ON DANGEROUS GROUND.?

 

I beg you please don?t make Big Jim Wilson mad. He takes the job home with him. He?s become like the dirty thugs he has to arrest. I?ve seen his sad, spartan, little apartment. He?s alone and I think kind of lonely. I like his brute strength. (No girl wants to be with a wimp). He uses his fists at the drop of a hat. But I saw him flinch once; some slight from a waitress. Jim gets sent out of the urban jungle to solve murder in the snowbound country. And there he meets a blind girl. If you ever doubted someone could change, I?d like you to meet Jim.

 

(3). LEE MARVIN as Vince Stone in ?THE BIG HEAT.?

 

Vince is a despicable woman beating rat ****. There is nothing redeemable about him. I cannot rationally explain why he?s one of my favorites. He is exciting to watch. He?s just a human ball of TNT. Gee, if I could just channel his anger. I know, I?ll make him a nice pot of hot coffee and...

 

(2). VICTOR MATURE as Nick Bianco in ?KISS OF DEATH.?

 

Hmmm...Nicky Nicky Nicky. I want to run my fingers through his hair. I want to dress his wounds. He?s so big and strong but he?s very gentle. Nick just got caught up in rotten circumstances and now he?s got a laughing hyena (Tommy Udo) on his back. D?ya see how he is with his two little girls? Nettie believes in him, Lt. D?Angelo believes in him. Nick wants to do the right thing even if he has to spill a little blood to do it. And when he does that ?right thing? I?ll have a nice plate of pasta waiting for him.

 

(1). ROBERT MITCHUM as Jeff Bailey in ?OUT OF THE PAST.?

 

Bogie may be the original...but Mitchum is the quintessential film noir leading male. You can't be "GWTW" and Fred & Ginger all rolled into one, and come in second place. No siree. I find Mitchum to be the man who stands head and shoulders above the rest. I present Jeff Bailey. Jeff?s a tough guy. But you know the bigger they are, the harder they fall. He didn?t stand a chance. If he had watched ?The Strange Love of Martha Ivers? he?d have known not to look back, don?t ever look back. But I guess the past reached out to grab him. I love Jeff?s strength, I love his weakness. I love his ease in any situation: with Whit, getting info at the nightclub, meeting Eels. I love his aloofness. He doesn?t care about anything. The job was simple; all he had to do was bring back a girl. That?s all. The bigger they are...the harder they love.

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Thanks, CinemAva, for bringing out the big boys! :D Looks like Jeff Bailey is pretty much top dog in Dark City, followed by Sam Spade and Jim Wilson. All to the good because I really love all three characters and enjoyed your witty descriptions thoroughly. You almost had me in tears for poor ol' Jim.

 

And thanks for mentioning Sheldon Leonard. :x

 

P.S. I just wanted to add that I've always had a soft spot for Vic Mature's "Nick" in KISS OF DEATH and your description of Widmark's "Tommy Udo" as a laughing hyena had me rolling! I'll never forget it!

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Oct 28, 2009 6:12 PM

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38. The Help the Handicapped Old Lady Down the Stairs Merit Badge/A Hat as

Big as the Ritz Award: A dual win for Tommy Udo from Kiss of Death. Tommy

has a job to do and, for the most part, he does it with ruthless efficiency. And he

also manages some clever wiseguy patter in between the sneers. This role put Dicky

W. among Hollywood's Most Wanted. And how about that over extended dinner plate

he wears as a hat. This baby is so huge, it should have its own Wide Load sign at the

back. They don't make too many tough guys like Udo anymore, or those hats either.

Thank goodness for small favors.

 

43. Charles Oakley, Indifferent anti-materialist. Charming Uncle Charlie already has

the burden of being The Merry Widow Killer, but Mr. Oakley brings the specter of a

much more fascinating world view into the gentle home of his niece. As he points

out, nothing much in life interests him. What could be more opposed to the lovingly

observed rituals of middle-class life as found in that home, which for in-depth detail

have no equal in noir, most likely courtesy of screen writer Thornton Wilder It makes

perfect sense that the policemen after Charlie would pose as pollsters concerned

with the ways and means of the average American family.

 

But Uncle Charlie has little interest in the material things that make up such a large

part of the real world. His nihilistic attitude can only seem alien in such surroundings,

which he can never truly fit into. The most obvious consequence of his beliefs is his

attitude toward money. At the start of the movie, Charlie leaves his money carelessly

scattered around his room, as his landlady notes. And when Charlie wants to open

an account at the bank where his brother-in-law works, he casually informs the bank

president that he has no interest in money, which causes the stuffed shirt to gaze in

amazement at the person who could make such a statement. Charles Oakley will

forever be a stranger no matter where he goes, which he himself seems to realize,

making his ultimate fate a kind of deliverance.

 

 

75. The Larch-Most bullet-riddled species of tree in noir history.

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Thanx for listening to me wax poetic about film noir, Ms. G. This is a great thread you created; you're getting a lot of genuine heartfelt impassioned responses. Noir is a great genre. I think more than any other, you can really get a bead on a person who enjoys it.

 

(P.S. I know you're a "Sheldonite" ;-) I was just watching him in "Decoy").

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> {quote:title=sineast wrote:}{quote}

> But Uncle Charlie has little interest in the material things that make up such a large part of the real world. His nihilistic attitude can only seem alien in such surroundings, which he can never truly fit into. The most obvious consequence of his beliefs is his

attitude toward money. At the start of the movie, Charlie leaves his money carelessly scattered around his room, as his landlady notes. And when Charlie wants to open an account at the bank where his brother-in-law works, he casually informs the bank president that he has no interest in money, which causes the stuffed shirt to gaze in amazement at the person who could make such a statement. Charles Oakley will forever be a stranger no matter where he goes, which he himself seems to realize, making his ultimate fate a kind of deliverance.

 

That's a good point about Uncle Charlie, I don't think I quite picked up on that the last time I watched the movie. I'll have to keep an eye out for it next time I watch it.

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I believe those two were fifth uncle nephews twenty times removed. ;) Joe

did hail from Richmond, VA after all.

 

As far as I remember, the landlady warned Charlie not to be so careless about

his money, but I don't think she actually took any. The look on the banker's face

when Uncle Charlie drops that bomb is hard to forget. Priceless. (Don't forget his

suit and hat either)

 

 

 

91. Short End of the Stick Citation: Don't know Hume Cronyn's physical measurements,

but he looks to be on the slight build side, but put him in a tee shirt and give him a

blackjack and he's pretty tough. Yeah, he's cheating cause he's usually got some

uniformed goons to back him up, but that's Munsey's way. Going up against Burt

Lancaster, old Captain Munsey held his own, tee shirt and all. Things are always

rough in Captain Munsey's Neighborhood.

 

14. You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby nod to Young Charlie. Leaving behind the

sordid negatively idealized world of noir films, and taking things to a more practi-

cal level, examining the plausibles, as Sir Alfred would say, how about Charlie's

sweet ride? She's out of high school, doesn't appear to be attending college or

have a job, sort of loafs about the house and daydreams in her bedroom while

"suffering" from that old ennui. Kid's got it made. Sure, she's a sweet all-American

girl next door type. Yes, seventy years ago things were very different, and the

daughter was allowed to stay in the nest, but shouldn't she be out working or

volunteering in the war effort? A slacker before her time? Even with her slothful

ways, one can't help liking cute, sweet Young Charlie. Bet she plays that

card once in a while. In the end, it doesn't matter because Detective Carey shows

up just in time. P.S. Gonna need a maid.

 

22. The Larch: Silent witnesses of Valli's mournful walk away from the cemetery

gates.

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> {quote:title=sineast wrote:}{quote}

> 14. You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby nod to Young Charlie. Leaving behind the sordid negatively idealized world of noir films, and taking things to a more practical level, examining the plausibles, as Sir Alfred would say, how about Charlie's sweet ride? She's out of high school, doesn't appear to be attending college or have a job, sort of loafs about the house and daydreams in her bedroom while "suffering" from that old ennui. Kid's got it made. Sure, she a sweet all-American girl next door type. Yes, seventy years ago things were very different, and the daughter was allowed to stay in the nest, but shouldn't she be out working or volunteering in the war effort? A slacker before her time? Even with her slothful ways, one can't help liking cute, sweet Young Charlie. Bet she plays that card once in a while. In the end, it doesn't matter because Detective Carey shows up just in time. P.S. Gonna need a maid.

>

 

Wasn't she just right out of HS or something? I always thought she was, and was to start working fairly soon. Then again, she could just have been another Santa Rosa slacker.

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That's something I'll have to look for next time it's on. I don't want to be too mean

to such a sweet kid. An early No Cal slacker? Whatever. The cozy, detailed middle-class

environment of the whole picture is one of the things I like about it the most, even

without considering it as a place that is in such contrast to the world as seen through

Uncle Charlie's eyes. Gotta go and catch a wave. ;)

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Reconsidering it, that sweet kid did lend a helping hand when Uncle

Charlie blew into town. She helped carry some of his luggage from the

train station, as did the other family members, while he stepped back

and regally observed the scene, a foreshadowing of his attitude to

the small-town ways of his relatives.

 

 

72. Supporting Character Most Likely to Fade into the Background: General

Sternwood from The Big Sleep. For the father of two daughters who have

more than enough energy, the General seems rather lethargic. He does hire

Spade to do some work for him, but he seems to have taken on the drooping

profile of his hothouse plants. While the old general sits serenely amid his

humid little cubbyhole, Sam is sweating bullets, and the General's two daughters

are out on the town up to their hijinks. You wouldn't think a military man would

let himself turn into a hothouse plant, but Sterny is getting closer and closer. Too

bad Morticia Addams wasn't his neighbor.

 

58. Sweetest Woman in the World, or at least in Banning, CA.: Paula Gibson from

D.O.A. You'd have to be blind not to see that sweet Paula is madly in love with

her boss, Frank Bigelow. But Frank, in modern terms, is showing a lack of commitment

to their relationship. He still likes his independence, which drives Paula up the wall.

And she waits by the phone while the big lug parties it up in SF. It's only when he's

close to death that he realizes he loves her, but then it's too late. Too kind to even

be in the same room with a femme fatale, too spunky to be a femme banale, Paula is

probably the nicest woman in noir.

 

82. The Larch: Its sturdy trunk shelters good and bad guys alike from the whistling

bullets of their enemies.

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*I am very surprised by numbers 5, 4 and 2. Very. And intrigued. Especially by "Julia Ross". She's number two, so there has to be more to it than she's "strong"....can't you 'splain just wee bit further? I saw the movie and liked it very much...I should watch it again tonight.*

 

Okay (GROSS OVERSTATEMENT ALERT): So often the major female characters of note in film noir are femme fatales, the Eve substitute, the corrupter of Man, the overtly sexual woman who leads Man astray and must be destroyed so that the World (i.e. Man) will not tilt off of its axis with finality.

 

Julia Ross is an independent woman at the start, becomes a woman in peril, and -- really breaking with convention -- stands up to her peril and fights it with her emotional strength and her _brain_ without the Man around. The anti-Gaslight, if you will.

 

I love *My Name Is Julia Ross* (but I have a bias in favor of Joseph H. Lewis movies) and that character is a major reason. I guess I'm just a warm and fuzzy, cuddly feminist in noir clothing.

 

Kinda like my bud, Timothy Carey.

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You are funny, Mr Warm and Fuzzy. Thank you for the 'splanation. I'll have to see it again.

 

...stands up to her peril and fights it with her emotional strength and her brain without the Man around.

 

How depressing!

 

:P

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Well, for what it?s worth, here are my choices which are very "light weight" because I can't check my lantern at the door when I enter the world of film noir. :)

 

Female Characters:

 

1. *Laura* (Gene Tierney in Laura) ? She is my favorite because I just love to watch her and the intrigue that swirls around her, simply from her painting, from everyone?s comments about her.

 

2. *Mae Doyle* (Barbara Stanwyck in Clash by Night) ? I can identify with her hopelessness, having to come back home??where you go when you run out of places.?

 

3. *Stella* (Linda Darnell in Fallen Angel) ? I understand her toughness because she?s on her own, but like FrankGrimes said, what she really at bottom wants what most any woman wants. And then this girl was violated. It really says something about the vulnerability of a single girl with no family in the world.

 

4. *Doris* (Beatrice Pearson in Force of Evil) - She?s the sort of good angel in the really dark movie, but I like that they show how seductive badness can be to a na?ve sort of young person, and how unwittingly you can be tarnished or harmed by the mere proximity of evil.

 

5. *Lucia Harper* (Joan Bennett in The Reckless Moment) ? Because it?s just one of the best performances by an actress in any film noir I?ve ever seen. And because you don?t often see a parent as the protagonist in a film noir. Maybe it isn?t really a film noir?

 

6. *Irena* (Simone Simon in Cat People) ? Irena makes me feel terribly sorry for her, I can?t see her as evil or ?possessed? of evil. To me, she?s different and seems to suffer for it, somewhat unjustly, partly by her own weakness and fears. She?s very tragic and Simone?s sad-kitty face makes her even more memorably haunting.

 

7. *Gilda* (Rita Hayworth in Gilda) ? I could say it?s because Rita plays a woman who plays games with the man she loves and finds herself trapped by them, but the fact is, like Gene Tierney, I just enjoy watching her and wishing I could look like that and be fascinating.

 

All of these ladies---except Lucia Harper---suffer from the dangers of a world that separates people from stable home and family. Lucia suffers because she is trying to protect that stable home and family from the world that is threatening it.

 

 

Male Characters

 

1. ?Scottie? Ferguson (James Stewart in Vertigo) ? Best performance in a film noir, if this can be considered a film noir. If it?s not, then I apologize, but it?s too riveting for me not to include it. Stewart is tragic, heartbreaking. Casting is critical because this could be a real turn-off, this character, but because it?s Jimmy I can see his purity, that he?s not really a bad man, just tormented. He seems rootless, like he doesn?t belong. His little apartment seems impersonal. He just ?wanders about?. This is very sad to me, and very real and speaks to the Post World Wars malaise.

 

2. *Jim Wilson* (Robert Ryan in On Dangerous Ground). Everyone else has already said it better than me, why he should be on any list. I just find it a wonderful example of a man in the pit of blackness finding his way out of the dark into the light?by a blind woman.

 

3. *Joe Adams* (Henry Fonda in The Long Night) ? I saw this movie only this past year for the first time and Fonda?s performance just impressed me so. I mean because it is so tragic and he?s really just caught up in other people?s screwed-upness. He?s a fairly happy guy, all things considered when you realize he started life out an orphan. Until he meets a girl, a girl he thinks at first is just like him. Same background, sweet, clean. He?s been around, been to war, he longs for her. He meets another girl, who?s been around and longs for HIS sweetness, his cleanness. Then he meets Vincent Price and that alone makes this character worth mentioning because watching a Henry Fonda deal with Vincent Price in any movie has to be seen to be believed. Talk about opposites!! Price is a great choice for casting because he alone illustrates just how wacked out the circumstances are that plain Joe Adams finds himself in. Nothing but a screwed up world would put Joe within a mile of a man like Price?s?get this name: ?Maximillian The Great.?

 

4. *Joe Morse* (John Garfield in Force of Evil) ? SPOILER!!!! Joe?s character is very real to me, I?ve known men like him, and yet so tragic---so tragic that I always think the movie ends with his death and it doesn?t. But it feels like he dies, like it?s not his brother (Thomas Gomez) lying down there broken on the rocks, but him.

 

5. *Roy Earle* (Humphrey Bogart in High Sierra)- I almost put Dix Steele instead but I think I still prefer this character for even though he?s playing a bank robber, he?s got a curious ?just wants to settle down in peace? quality to him that really makes you believe that this man did time and must have longed for ?normal?, for a home and to put all this crazy shoot-em-ups behind him. But, of course, to do that he needs to pull just one more job?. Like Joe Adams, he meets a young girl who seems to represent what he longs for and he also meets another kind of girl who?s been around (Ida Lupino). His longings and reactions with each a fascinating because he does act differently, though he?s curiously kinder and more protective toward women in this movie than I can recall from most of his films. This makes Roy Earle a very special character and equally unique, to me, from Bogart.

 

6. *Raven* (Alan Ladd in This Gun For Hire) ? Like Jackie said, he?s one of the most sad and poignant characters in all of assassindom! Ladd brings out the character?s vulnerability in so unexpected a fashion for a character like that. It?s not supposed to be: we?re not supposed to see a man like that as human, after all. But he is very human and just being shown a little understanding for once, by Veronica Lake, is enough to set him on a different path.

 

7. *Jeff Bailey* (Robert Mitchum in Out of the Past) ? Like the others, I just can?t leave him off! The character gets to do more than just be a fool for a worthless woman, so I have to say it does resonate more than, say, Dan Milner in His Kind of Woman. But I love Dan Milner, too. Love a man that makes me laugh so much and Mitchum was never as funny as he was in those two movies. Only Jeff makes me a little sad so on my list he goes because this is film noir.

 

8. *Martin Donnelly* (James Mason in The Reckless Moment) ? Finally a James Mason character that registers emotionally with me! And he does it IN SPADES. His character, again, like Joe Adams, Jim Wilson, Roy Earle and Joe Morse?is a man who meets the real thing after a life time of cheap and wretchedness. Only to find this woman is forever out of reach. But in his own small?and lastly, a great and final way?he reaches. And breaks my heart.

 

Most of these men have it in them to appreciate what makes for real happiness, real love, real self-respect and it's often represented in the person of a woman, a better kind of woman than each may have ever known. Some of them make a sacrifice some make a change, but each is shown to be more than just a hood, or a bum, or a loser or a criminal.

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Ciao, Miss Gun for Hire -- It's about time! You were actually making me look productive.

 

Shockingly, I actually like your choices. But there's plenty to rip, too. :P

 

1. Laura (Gene Tierney in Laura) ? She is my favorite because I just love to watch her and the intrigue that swirls around her, simply from her painting, from everyone?s comments about her.

 

She's your favorite? What does she do?! :P

 

2. Mae Doyle (Barbara Stanwyck in Clash by Night) ? I can identify with her hopelessness, having to come back home??where you go when you run out of places.?

 

You're back in Texas?

 

3. Stella (Linda Darnell in Fallen Angel) ? I understand her toughness because she?s on her own, but like FrankGrimes said, what she really at bottom wants what most any woman wants. And then this girl was violated. It really says something about the vulnerability of a single girl with no family in the world.

 

Now this one completely surprised me. I didn't know you liked "Stella" this much.

 

6. Irena (Simone Simon in Cat People) ? Irena makes me feel terribly sorry for her, I can?t see her as evil or ?possessed? of evil. To me, she?s different and seems to suffer for it, somewhat unjustly, partly by her own weakness and fears. She?s very tragic and Simone?s sad-kitty face makes her even more memorably haunting.

 

Your liking an "icy" woman doesn't surprise me. :P What's a man to do?!

 

7. Gilda (Rita Hayworth in Gilda) ? I could say it?s because Rita plays a woman who plays games with the man she loves and finds herself trapped by them, but the fact is, like Gene Tierney, I just enjoy watching her and wishing I could look like that and be fascinating.

 

Hmmmmmmm...

 

1. ?Scottie? Ferguson (James Stewart in Vertigo) ? Best performance in a film noir, if this can be considered a film noir. If it?s not, then I apologize, but it?s too riveting for me not to include it. Stewart is tragic, heartbreaking. Casting is critical because this could be a real turn-off, this character, but because it?s Jimmy I can see his purity, that he?s not really a bad man, just tormented. He seems rootless, like he doesn?t belong. His little apartment seems impersonal. He just ?wanders about?. This is very sad to me, and very real and speaks to the Post World Wars malaise.

 

That was wonderfully expressed. I love the contrast of Madeleine and Judy AND Madeleine and Midge, and how Scottie views them all. It's a very strong commentary on man and his desire of woman.

 

3. Joe Adams (Henry Fonda in The Long Night) ? I saw this movie only this past year for the first time and Fonda?s performance just impressed me so. I mean because it is so tragic and he?s really just caught up in other people?s screwed-upness. He?s a fairly happy guy, all things considered when you realize he started life out an orphan. Until he meets a girl, a girl he thinks at first is just like him. Same background, sweet, clean. He?s been around, been to war, he longs for her. He meets another girl, who?s been around and longs for HIS sweetness, his cleanness. Then he meets Vincent Price and that alone makes this character worth mentioning because watching a Henry Fonda deal with Vincent Price in any movie has to be seen to be believed. Talk about opposites!! Price is a great choice for casting because he alone illustrates just how wacked out the circumstances are that plain Joe Adams finds himself in. Nothing but a screwed up world would put Joe within a mile of a man like Price?s?get this name: ?Maximillian The Great.?

 

That was a fascinating read. I do like Joe's feeling of being "trapped."

 

6. Raven (Alan Ladd in This Gun For Hire) ? Like Jackie said, he?s one of the most sad and poignant characters in all of assassindom! Ladd brings out the character?s vulnerability in so unexpected a fashion for a character like that. It?s not supposed to be: we?re not supposed to see a man like that as human, after all. But he is very human and just being shown a little understanding for once, by Veronica Lake, is enough to set him on a different path.

 

I like Raven's caring for stray cats. He cannot associate with humans, but he can with a stray cat.

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>

> She's your favorite? What does she do?! :P

>

 

When a lady is that beautiful she doesn't have to "do" anything...she just has to be. :)

 

>

> You're back in Texas?

>

 

BITE your tongue!!

 

>

> Now this one completely surprised me. I didn't know you liked "Stella" this much.

>

 

There aren't tons and tons of female characters I like all that much in film noir, but I never forgot Stella in spite of her relatively small part. I always lost interest in the movie whenever she wasn't around.

 

>

> Your liking an "icy" woman doesn't surprise me. :P What's a man to do?!

>

 

She isn't icy!! Ollie said he was attracted to her warmth remember. Alice is the Fair Miss Frigidaire, if you ask me.

 

>

> Hmmmmmmm...

>

 

Yes?

 

>

> That was wonderfully expressed. I love the contrast of Madeleine and Judy AND Madeleine and Midge, and how Scottie views them all. It's a very strong commentary on man and his desire of woman.

>

 

A lonely, rootless man.

 

>

> That was a fascinating read. I do like Joe's feeling of being "trapped."

>

 

I was really, really impressed with this characterization. I felt horrible for him, just horrible. And I found Barbara Bel Geddes' character very problematic.

 

>

> I like Raven's caring for stray cats. He cannot associate with humans, but he can with a stray cat.

 

Why? Did someone put you out one night and never let you back in? Smart people!

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When a lady is that beautiful she doesn't have to "do" anything...she just has to be.

 

Now it makes sense why she is your favorite. You just wish to be. I like that kind of laziness.

 

You're back in Texas?

 

BITE your tongue!!

 

You said you went home! Are you in Oklahoma, Grape of Wrath?

 

There aren't tons and tons of female characters I like all that much in film noir, but I never forgot Stella in spite of her relatively small part. I always lost interest in the movie whenever she wasn't around.

 

She is nothing but captivating. Ahhhh, I need to go to the jukebox.

 

She isn't icy!!

 

The heck she ain't!

 

Ollie said he was attracted to her warmth remember.

 

Yeah, until he found out he needed to be a monk to be with her.

 

Alice is the Fair Miss Frigidaire, if you ask me.

 

They had a kid!

 

Yes?

 

You seem plenty indecent, Gilda.

 

A lonely, rootless man.

 

He had Midge! She's full of "warmth," you know.

 

I was really, really impressed with this characterization. I felt horrible for him, just horrible. And I found Barbara Bel Geddes' character very problematic.

 

Poor, Barbie. What was wrong with her?

 

Why? Did someone put you out one night and never let you back in? Smart people!

 

Butterscotch always does that to me! And then she knits me mittens, as if that's going to make things all better. Awful. Just awful.

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>

> Now it makes sense why she is your favorite. You just wish to be. I like that kind of laziness.

>

 

:) Sounds divine.

 

>

> You said you went home! Are you in Oklahoma, Grape of Wrath?

>

 

No, I mean that I identify with thinking home is where you go if you run out of places. She meant, "Dead End".

 

>

> Yeah, until he found out he needed to be a monk to be with her.

>

 

Excuse ME but he ran out on her right when she was cured. To that frostbitten, husband chasing minx!

 

>

> They had a kid!

>

 

They adopted her. That was Irena's kid, anyone could see that. :P

 

>

> You seem plenty indecent, Gilda.

>

 

I am NO Gilda, more's the pity.

 

>

> He had Midge! She's full of "warmth," you know.

>

 

She's full alright.

 

>

> Poor, Barbie. What was wrong with her?

>

 

Why did she string poor Joe along like that? Poor Joe!

 

>

> Butterscotch always does that to me! And then she knits me mittens, as if that's going to make things all better. Awful. Just awful.

 

Maybe because you're always losing them.

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Excuse ME but he ran out on her right when she was cured. To that frostbitten, husband chasing minx!

 

Cured?! When was she ever cured?

 

I am NO Gilda, more's the pity.

 

You're selling your indecency way too short.

 

Why did she string poor Joe along like that? Poor Joe!

 

She's a woman!

 

Maybe because you're always losing them.

 

I shouldn't need them!

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