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Turner "Classic"?


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I get the feeling that Turner Classic Movies sometimes is turning the history page a little too soon. It's not so "classic" anymore. Classis, to me, should mean "over 25 years of age". I think the programming guide/guidess should stick with the 1920s/30/40s/ and some 1950s and leave the 1960s/1970s/1980s for later years. Yes, I understand that the "weekly specials" sometimes leave programmers no choice but to air it but, please, while it's still classic. And for those of you who do so choose to respond to this, keep in mind that this is just my opinion. I love TCM for keeping history alive.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I really don't want to start an argument of what the term "classic" means. "Classic" does not mean it has to be at lease 25 years old to be on TCM. We have films which have been released in the past ten years in "Gladiator," "Titantic", "Chicago", "Unforgiven" "The Matrix", "The Lord of the Rings" and "Harry Potter" trilogies which could be stamped with the term "classic" right now.

 

There are films which have never been on TCM like "The Snake Pit", "Pretty Poison", "A Letter to Three Wives" and "Shane" which have been stamped with the term "classic" but have never been on TCM. Hopefully these films will make their way on Turner Classic Movies in the coming future.

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I agree completely, i believe that some movies that were made in the 60's 70's or 80's might have been very well made movies that someday could be considered a classic but for now the classics are the movies made in the 20's 30's 40's and 50's... and personally I like them more anywys... good topic.

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I think Bueller is a classic. What Hughes did on film during this era will be remembered for a long time. In a five year span in the 80"s Hughes directed these calssics: Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Planes Trains & Automobiles, and Uncle Buck. Also produced in 1990 another classic Home Alone.

Like Andy Hardy the teen films listed will be remembered and enjoyed in the future.

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I know it probably isn't a realistic hope, but I'd love to see a channel devoted exclusively to films made from the silent era through about 1960. I love many newer movies, but they are so ubiquitous on other channels that I don't see the point of featuring them on a classic movie channel like TCM. I used to love American Movie Classics, but it has pretty much become a 1970s wasteland. Of all decades of films, that is my least favorite.

 

I sometimes get very depressed thinking how little exposure the average person now has to black-and-white movies. When old movies were used as television filler, everyone who ever had insomnia got a dose of them, and they were a common cultural reference. Now I can surf through an entire satellite TV menu--dozens of channels--and not see one production made before 1975.

 

They are becoming history, like Mozart's and Beethoven's music. There will always be a select few who love old movies, but they are leaving the everyday warp and woof of our culture.

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I think AMC is promoting the idea that they're showing THE classics of any era with the possible idea that it will broaden their viewers base. Whether they're labeled as classics or something else the majority of TCM's viewers like older movies. Probably especially black and whites. TCM may get away with playing newer movies every once in awhile but if it became more of the norm there would be some noise made. Surely there are more newer movies that are considered classics than what is occasionally shown on TCM. If all of them were shown equally as the older classics TCM would not be what it is now. It may not sound flattering but the appeal of TCM for the most part is in fact an issue of decades.

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Calling ANY of the John Hughes films 'Classics' might be stretching it a bit. They were fun in their time, but I personally never have the urge to sit down and watch SIXTEEN CANDLES, THE BREAKFAST CLUB, or FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF, these days. A classic should have a timeless appeal that reaches film fans of all ages and geographies. The Hughes films definitely bring back some degree of 80's nostalgia, though. There not bad as entertainment, but 'classics?' I guess we all define a 'classic' by our own terms, and perhaps that's how it should be.

 

I don't think there should ever be a defined 'time-period,' as to what is and isn't a classic, and I suppose it depends on personal opinion. I personally wouldn't define any of the HARRY POTTER or LORD OF THE RINGS movies as classics. That's kind of unfair coming from me, because I dislike BOTH of those franchises. I just think a classic should at least have a faint reflection of the time in which it was made, as well as having a story that has universal allure and meaning.

 

I've stated this in another post here in the past, but I think there are classics that are released every year. WHALE RIDER, which was released last year, comes to mind. I'll admit that I know next to nothing about the Maori culture in New Zealand, but the film's story was told in such a way that it relates to and touches ALL cultures. Who knows? Maybe the definition of a classic depends on who you are. If you look at any critic's list of their 10 favorite films of all-time, I'll bet you'll find one or two on the list that you will absolutely loathe.

 

Sorry for being so long-winded, but I don't buy that classics in any form (ART, MUSIC, LITERATURE, etc.) are defined by time restrictions. Having said all that, I do prefer most of the 'older' films on the TCM roster.......

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No, keith, good grammar is a lost art, and I think it a good thing when someone pays attention to their writing skills.

 

Also, as I've mentioned elsewhere, this site is as user unfriendly as it can get via the 'edit' button. Impossible to use, so one had either get their post right the first time or open another window to cut and paste it. Or at least I have to do this on my machine.

 

I think the term 'classic' is an arbitrary one. According to whom? The newspapers and media talking heads who make up LISTS? Heck, they have said 'Titanic' was one of the best movies of all times, and I think it stank to high heaven. For my part, outside of all the long touted 'classics'...I wasn't thrilled with GWTW as a 'classic', it was just a herculean effort of a movie...I consider 'Shrek' to be timeless. It was fresh, novel, well produced, and clever by half. I think it will be as funny in 20 years as it is today.

 

As my father says, "salsiccia his own". Okay, he's Italian, "salsiccia" is the Italian word for sausage, and it's a play on "to each his own".

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stoneyburke666,

 

I think I PREFER your father's version! Oh, and I took some flak for this in an earlier post, but I agree with your opinion of GONE WITH THE WIND. I never cared for the film, but maybe it's an error in judgment on my part. Who knows? 'Salsiccia' his own, indeed.

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The two major differences between TCM & AMC is that Turner has a host - AMC does not, and that there as yet anyway, no commercials. Other thaN that they both show the same film OVER AND OVER!!! Oh, and one other thing:TCM shows ancient relics from 20's & 30's and I don't mean 'Red Dust' that was great, but some other one's,please..

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Ummm, Leo, I don't think the issue here is really the difference between TCM and AMC. It's a discussion about the difference between what is and isn't a 'classic' and why. Once again, you categorize any film before 1935 (or thereabouts) as an 'ancient relic,' and with that myopic opinion, I don't think you really qualify to be in this argument. You are always going on about 'comprehension,' and once again, I fail to comprehend how you can complain about the films from the early years of cinema, on a site dedicated to 'classic' film. If many of these early films aren't classics, then I just don't think you understand the meaning of the word, Leo.

 

How you can complain about TCM's wonderful programming is beyond me. Sometimes Leo, I've learned that if you don't have something positive to add, it is very adult to just keep anything negative or whiny to yourself. Once you learn this, if you ever do, we just might see eye to eye on something. I would honestly like for one exchange between us to be favorable. I'm still waiting.........

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I guess all these terms are rather nebulous. In the car world (correct me if you know all about the car world, because I know little), I believe any car older than 25 years old is considered "antique" (you mean my '79 Horizon would be an antique if I hadn't totaled it?) while the term "classic" applies only to a "fine" or "distinctive" automobile older than 25. But then I think there are some automobile buffs who say that 25 is "classic," while 55 is "antique."

 

As a matter of fact, if we were to have a semantic discussion, I think the word "antique" has been abused over time, losing its evocation of high quality, so that you have junk shops that can hang out a shingle proclaiming "Antiques."

 

So if we don't want to presume that all old movies are of high quality by calling them antique or classic, what term do we use? "Vintage?" Again, a word that connotes high quality, as in well-aged wine.

 

Hey! I know! Why don't we call them "old movies?"

 

Because the average twentysomething person now would describe "Pretty in Pink" as an old movie.

 

We need to describe what we like by decade or era, as in "I'm a fan of silents," or "I like the films of the '30s and '40s."

 

I have a tendency to like some of the forgotten movies, and dislike some of the so-called classics, too. Then there is the odd way that I can just enjoy a movie even though it is awful, just because it shows me what people wore in the past and what kinds of cars they drove. You know, classic cars. [wink]

 

 

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