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Great Bits from Mediocre Movies


skimpole
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Here's an idea for a thread. There are movies which one either doesn't like or particularly care for, but there are parts which you do like. These movies should be distinguished from movies which most people don't like, but which you do.

 

For examle:

 

The Wiz: "Brand New Day"

 

Once Upon a time in Mexico: Johnny Depp's character "...you really must try this because it's a puerco pibil, it is a slow roasted pork, nothing fancy, just happens To be my favorite, and I order it, with a tequila and lime in every dive I go to in this country, and honestly, that is the best it's ever been, anywhere, in fact is too good, it is so good that when I finish with it, I'll pay my check walk straight into the kitchen and shoot the cook, because that's what I do, I restore the balance to this country, and that is what I like you from you right now..."

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  • 1 year later...

While it is on the Essentials, I find *San Francisco* to be pretty standard fare, redeemed by the best Earthquake ever caught on film! The editing of the earthquake sequences, particularly the first part, can be set next to anything done in foreign films at that time. It is an example of the great art of film making! The rest of the film has aged rather poorly.

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> {quote:title=Kinokima wrote:}{quote}

> High Society is an inferior version to Philadelphia Story but I have to admit seeing Crosby and Sinatra sing together is quite awesome.

 

 

I find it superior, in every way.

 

My choice would be 1956's THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH, which is filled with great moments, but is mediocre, overall.

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Omigod, how can you call the '56 *Man Who Knew Too Much* mediocre? It is one of Hitchcock's greatest. His target: religion, particularly of the most dour and fundamentalist sort. This movie is as good as it gets. I've been watching the "Ambrose Chapel" hymn scene alot lately; it sends shivers down my spine when I see scenes as brilliant as that!

 

And the music -- Hitchcock always loved to integrate music into the plot. In this film we have the shot in the Albert Hall, during the concert; the aforementioned "Ambrose Chapel" scene -- that Wesleyan hymn! ("Why hides the sun...") -- and of course, "Que Sera Sera." All so carefully intertwined with the plot and mood of this remarkable film.

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  • 7 months later...

i think both 80's Prince movies are extremely mediocre the moment the music stops and the dialogue begins. But the music is so great it almost makes up for all the awkward dialogue and acting. (I haven't seen Graffiti Bridge, but even the soundtrack to that one is pretty awful, so i can't imagine how bad the non-musical parts of it might be).

 

there's a 1932 public domain movie i watched the other day called 'Manhattan Tower' (free download at archive.org). i enjoyed it, so i wouldn't exactly call it mediocre, but it is in most ways a typical office drama of the early-talkie era. but there's one scene that stood out from all the others and had me laughing out loud;

 

A secretary is at her desk beginning to eat her lunch. her boss calls her into his private office briefly to give her a message. A drunk wanders into the now-empty office, sees a pickle on the secretary's desk and stuffs it into his pocket, then wanders out of the office. right after, a stuffy business executive-type comes into the office for a meeting with the boss, and is standing by the secretary's desk when she returns to the room. after he leaves, the secretary discovers her pickle is gone and assumes the executive ate it.

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I don't think LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON is mediocre; it's just not great. But it's still better than most junk put out by Hollywood.

 

But you're right. That scene where Audrey is scooped up by Cooper while the music swells is a classic cinema image. Not to be forgotten..

 

I actually think that most of AN AMERICAN IN PARIS is mediocre (that awful French guy singing with the flutterly vibrato makes me want to go to the john every time) until the 18 minute ballet which seems to come from another, far better film.

 

Best,

Terry

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You think the message of THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH is anti-religion? Talk about projection. I don't think there is any such message in even one second of film in that movie. And you can't find a word of Hitchcock or anyone else who worked on that film to say so either.

 

I guess we can project onto films anything we wish.

 

Best,

Terry

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Hitchcock was a devout Roman Catholic. He lived in Bel Air and attended Good Shepherd Church in Beverly Hills. I don't think he would direct anything that criticized his religion. In fact, he directed a very good episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents that centered on a religious man dealing with temptation. It was called 'The Horseplayer' from season 6.

 

His work in I CONFESS is a great example of a film by a very Catholic director, a very heartfelt project...I think he sympathized with priests and men who had to keep secrets because of God.

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So what? Hitch used the song extremely well in the film....it's often considered one of THE best uses of a song in a movie. Early in the film it's used very lightheartedly when Doris' character sings to her son....and nearer the end it becomes very suspenseful as the son uses the whistled tune to let his parents know where he is. Regardless of whether it was forced on Hitch by the studio, Hitch knew how to use it for good effect.

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