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ohwell.gif Wow! Take a gander folks! This you gotta see. Amazon just put up a 5 minute promo, featuring excerpts from one of the two documentaries on the Blu-ray edition. This is fantastic! Now I am really pumped for the release! I was blown away. Thanks much to Greg Nestor for bringing it to our attention. Very impressive. Hopefully, my order will be here in just a few hours from now. Will need to hook my new Blu-ray player back up before it get's to dark. Hope I got home in time.

Let me just say that one of the first things Paramount should do is get all of the Bootleg's off of Ebay. When I looked in November, there were at least 6 different bootlegs, I mean 6 different kind of bootlegs, not the some covers and packaging there. Most looked very official. I don't know if any of those were the Photoplay version or not, probably all from the old 1985 Paramount laser-disc with the Gaylord Carter score, but there sure were a bunch of them. frown.gif I was pretty amazed at just how many .

 

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/mpd/permalink/ ... nt_fb_link|http://www.amazon.com/gp/mpd/permalink/m1JYFKM1EXC13S/ref=ent_fb_link" target="_

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Good Evening The Divine Miss G:

 

I watched Ford's "The World Moves On." You noted it was one of your lesser known favorite Ford films.

 

 

It's kind of an odd story. It's the story of an old industrial family that has installations in the US and various places in Europe with cousins all around and it is all good and well until WWI breaks out. Then it comes to the family crossing paths, at times without knowing it, and how the war impacts all the relatives.

 

Madeleine is fine and lovely. Franchot Tone is okay but a bit stiff but he picks it up late in the film. It's all beautifully filmed under Ford's hand. The battle scenes look especially good. The submarine loss is well done.

 

 

The family generational deja vu is the only awkward part of it all but other than that it is an interesting film and one I had never known. Is it me or is there a hint of "Four Sons" about it? It was shot after "Lost Patrol." It's fine but it doesn't strike me in the same vein as "Lost Patrol" with those fine discussions we had about it.

 

What is creepy is the way for 1934 he nailed those shots of Hitler, Mussolini and the Japanese. THat is ubless someone did some tinkering later on.

 

I'm glad I saw it.

 

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Jan 23, 2012 11:06 PM

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Mon cher MM,

 

Hi Chris...glad you go to see The World Moves On. It's interesting to step back and see the range of stories and genres Ford directed in the 1930s, like any director beginning to hit his stride in the studio system. This movie is overlong and one account for this is related to a writer who complained of cuts to his scrip to which Ford responded by filming every single scene as written and unedited. The movie wasn't mentioned by name but most people conclude it was TWMO.

 

I'm always amused by Ford's responses to interference. :D

 

****************

 

Did you watch *The Reckless Moment*, MM? Or have you seen it before? TCM declared this was a premier but I know it's aired before, if not in primetime. However I was very, very happy with last night's programming. *Many thanks to tcmprogrammr.* I love Ophuls'/Opuls' Hollywood films and TRM is my favorite, in fact it's rising as one of my all time favorite movies. Each time I watch I discover some new nuance and last night was no exception. I was stunned that I never paid attention to Lucia's (Joan Bennett) words as she drove the car tailing Donnelly. "I would lie...." Together with the fixed look in her face completely changes my interpretation of her feelings for him, they seem now to me to have been further along than I thought. What an amazing film.

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I have not seen "The Reckless Moment" before and didn't last night. I was out and then it was late enough I watched "The World Moves On." I have seen "Caught" before as well as "Letter" but that's been some time on the latter.

 

Too bad it didn't come on later. Movies are fine for insomnia.

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JAMESCAGNEYEachDawn.jpg

 

I'm loving "EACH DAWN I DIE." Cagney and Raft are a great team. And Cagney gives a fine performance. My favorite scene in the movie is the end...Jane Bryan waits for him, and the way Cagney steps out into the sunlight and breathes in that air; the way he grabs Jane Bryan's arm. All gestures. Great!

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Gestures?

 

Uh oh. I think we have a Norma Desmond Memorial "We Have Faces" Award nomination coming up!

 

This afternoon, we've got the original version that Disney used for Haley Mills' PARENT TRAP. This has Jack Palance instead - I kinda like it, but I do miss syrup in the hair...

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Hi JackaaAaay. :-) I've seen this movie a slew of times over my last five hundred and forty years. But it's only in recent years that I really understood it.

 

I've been thinking a lot about Marilyn Monroe off and on since I saw "My Week With Marilyn." I think I recorded...at least I hope I recorded TCM's recent airing of "The Prince & The Showgirl" during Jack Cardiff's night. I really want to check it out to see Marilyn after seeing Michelle Williams' amazing portrayal. I had on "The Misfits" this Saturday, at least up until the big horse wrangling round-up scenes start. (Nah, I can't take those).

 

What a disquieting movie. I don't know if I'm looking at this 1960 film with the 21st century spectre I know looms over all of the leads' fates. I most likely carried that perspective with me in past viewings, but not really this time around.

 

This time around I was really just focused on Marilyn. (I know...I know, 'duh?!') "The Misfits" is a movie where these four...three people become a dysfunctional little family, (you know...like the 20-year old teens in "Rebel Without A Cause"). As I watched Marilyn, I kept wondering...'IS SHE ACTING? SHE'S ACTING. IS SHE?'

 

My simple answer for my simple mind said, "Why of course she's acting. C'mon!" I've seen fotos of her on set...publicity shots with Gable, etc. etc. etc. But she has lots of moments of behavior in the movie that I don't think are scripted.

 

Her dance scene with Eli Wallach...I know he must have 1,001 more stories than Scherezade about his career on film and on stage. But if I had a chance to talk to him, I would want to hear him talk about Marilyn. Yes there's Lauren Bacall, but she and Wallach are among the few people still living who worked with her in front of the camera... Tony & Jack are gone, Gable & Monty, Mitchum...Olivier... Cary... Montand and any other number of people are now gone. In that dance scene, the way she snapped her fingers to keep herself going. The way...the way she questions Wallach about maybe teaching his (late) wife how to dance. There was something about her in that scene I was trying to grasp, but it kept disappearing like a puff of smoke.

 

There were behaviors and/or line readings that I felt were her. I felt Marilyn KNEW who this girl was. Her character was very sensitive... fragile... And while the men were practical ("Yeah, it's fun to almost break my neck on a bucking bronc" or "Grind 'em into dog food, it's just a paycheck to me"), (Whew!) she always opts for the gentle. Yes, she has that ball and paddle scene. I like how she goes at it...but, I felt bad at how she was being watched. And then I thought, she's aware of being watched. She also doesn't want a rabbit killed, she hugs a tree. She talks about a child not having parents there; a pre-Flower Child. She feels things. When she was with Thelma Ritter in the beginning...going for her divorce, there was something real about her. Like she was used to being on her own; having to rely on herself...no one in her corner (re: family). Here she was kind of practical...figuring out her next move. And tired. Tired of moving around. I really FELT her. But she is acting. Right?

 

"The Misfits" is a hard movie for me to watch and it's NOT one that I joyfully sit through with a bowl of popcorn & Haagen Dazs, 'cuz it's just so, I dunno...hard to watch this bundle of nerves exposed. She's a little like cotton candy; no, not in a sweet empty way. But in a way hard to grasp...hold onto. And when I think I do...when I think I'm seeing something real I often wonder, "how REAL can that be in front of all these cameras and crew." She laughed, she joked, she loved, she drank & ate & hurt... like the rest of us? Of course; she was human. But like the rest of us?

 

She existed. She wasn't a figment of our collective imagination, right? Believe me, I'm not trying to romanticize or mythologize this woman. The world has done that enough. Ha...maybe this is what I'm doing here. That's not my intention...I feel like I'm just trying to figure her out in my own mind. I love that photograph of her I posted below. I gotta tell ya Jackie, I don't think I feel this perplexed about any other movie star that I've EVER seen in movies. Hepburn, Stanwyck, Davis, Crawford. Lupino, Sheridan, Kerr, DeHavilland...I got them. Harlow and Lombard and Loy and Shearer...Harding, Goddard...no problem. But Marilyn....

 

She is an enigma.

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I don't mean to offend anyone, but to me Marilyn Monroe was a terrible actress. I tried to watch the Misfits again but all I see is Marilyn playing herself. Every performance was just another phase in her life. There were and still are an awful lot of unhappy and unfortunate actors in Hollywood, but somehow they seem to get through a movie shoot without making all the other people on the set miserable. Of course, this is just my opinion.

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There is something ethereal about her. Her soul is bared til it aches in that film. I felt her, felt for her, but I also ache for Gable's character. I think Marilyn was a natural, and yes I do think that reaching into yourself for a role IS acting, just as much as putting on an exterior act is also acting. They are two different ways to achieve the same thing. I think revealing one's self is probably the harder, at least for me it is, and is the more appropriate style for film.

 

I've always thought that scene with the paddle ball shows how innocent she really is. Like Gay says to her when he puts her to bed on top of the truck outside, "You started out liking to dance, but people turned it into something else, something wrong." Just like his job was turned from an exciting adventure into a sordid quest for wages, at the expense of a wild living thing.... and for what? For dog food. His identification was always with the wild horse, not with the companies that took those horses for what they could get out of them. So it's especially bitter for him to see himself suddenly on the other side. I think this is why, in the end, he chooses Roslyn's way, and let's it go. She can see him the way he wants to be seen, all the way through to the heart... if he stops at that point and never looks back. He's wrangling himself in that scene, the wild free man that he is...... And Gay, he sees her innocence. That's why I don't feel bad at the end of the movie...not that it's an easy watch... Still, to me, it is the happiest of endings, even if it is transient and frail. How will they live in the world? I don't know. But they chose life, and each other even if briefly. It was the right choice.

 

I guess I must identify with Roslyn/Marilyn, because she is not an enigma to me at all. Her life is, but she herself isn't. I think she's very close to my own personality, though I have hardened up over the years, learned to hide myself, whereas RoslynMarilyn just didn't have it in her, she let it all eat away at her, the people taking advantage, the horror of the world we live in. It's a shame she didn't live longer, because every time I watch The Misfits, I think what a great career she had ahead of her. She's perfect in it.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 30, 2012 11:00 AM

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 30, 2012 11:01 AM

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 30, 2012 11:09 AM

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I was just reading over our long discussion of *The Misfits* that we had back in 2008 (Was it really that long ago!!) in the Norma Jean thread. It's worth searching out. Somewhere in the page fifties of that thread.

 

Even those that don't like it might at least see what some of us found so powerful.

 

For me it was a beautiful film. I might have to watch it again and post some more here later.

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That was wonderful, Jackie. Very sweet. :)

 

I really like Marilyn. It's her "little girl" that I'm so drawn to. She's the kind of woman that places a man in a spot. Her natural sexuality makes us wolves but then her "little girl" turns us into a protective father. I feel you see this most clearly with "Roslyn" in *The Misfits*.

 

Your mentioning the "paddle ball" scene is the perfect example of the male quandry with the very innocent Roslyn (Marilyn). What to do? *The Seven Year Itch* "piano" scene is another.

 

Marilyn is a little girl.

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I agree that Marilyn was perfect fit for her role in The Misfits but in may ways being the perfect fit for a role does NOT qualify one as being a great or even good actress.

 

A great actor tackles roles (characters) that may not fit their own personality and is able to convince the audience that they are that character. So I'm not sure she would of had a great career ahead of her unless producers were going to cast her in similar roles again and again.

 

Of course all actors get typecast to a degree and both their studio and them will 'milk' this for maximum box office profits, but the greats breakout when given the chance. Take Olivia DeHavilland; She started out mostly as a damsel in distress and light comedy, becomes Melodie in GWTW and then moves on to roles like The Heiress and The Snake Pit. Marilyn doesn't have that type of range in her career and nothing suggest she would of if she didn't die after making The Misfits.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Jan 30, 2012 12:50 PM

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I do agree that Marilyn had an IT factor and that she projected this very well on screen. There is also the fact that viewers, especially many male ones, have a thing for blond bombshell types. This has been true during every era. That just isn't my type (give me an Ava Gardner type or even an Audrey Hepburn type).

 

 

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I do think what works for Marilyn also works against her. It's the same for John Wayne.

 

For men, there is the obvious carnality with Marilyn. For women, this very same thing can be what pushes them away from her. She can be seen as a threat and/or a "disgrace" to woman. It's the kind of woman Marilyn naturally projects.

 

Those seeking a strong woman will not like Marilyn for she is weak. She's a helpless child full of emotion. She is the antithesis of Bette Davis.

 

 

Ava Gardner is actually closer to Marilyn than Bette, for she often played "hiders" with childish tendencies. (Marilyn wasn't a "hider," though. She was very "naked.") Ava played the longing lover as good as anyone ever has. And I do feel Ava is a very underrated actress. But she played characters who mostly stayed in her "hot zone," ala Marilyn. Love her characters.

 

 

Audrey had a lovely childish quality to her, as well. She comes off as the "proper," sophisticated Marilyn, to me. Although, Marilyn is more of a puppy dog and Audrey is more of a kitten.

 

 

But ultimately, I think Marilyn falls victim to her naturalness. Her natural body and personality are what they are and most people just cannot get past this.

 

 

Marilyn is the "damsel in emotional distress" and these kind of women are becoming less and less attractive for women. But I think there is plenty of room for both the "strong" woman and the "weak" woman. A mix of the two is always wonderful. :)

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*I agree, she is a little girl inside, that's very astute of you. She opens up to everyone, and doesn't really realize the chaos she leaves in her wake. Look at how Eli Wallach and Gable end up after she enters the picture.*

 

She's naive, ignorant, and innocent. She worries about animals like they were her children whereas everyone else doesn't even think of them. She doesn't want to see anyone hurt, like a mother child with her baby doll. She's not a 12-year-old girl, she's a 5-year-old girl. What's a guy to do with a girl like that? Take advantage of her? What's that say about us? She pushes you to be more unselfish. You look to love and protect versus seek selfish desires. She's quite lovely.

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You've got a great handle on the film. How she turns the men into most what they are. As they interact with her, the true man comes out. With ****, we see something sick and disturbing come out. With Gay, it's just the opposite. His strength has to go somewhere... he can't put it into his work any more.

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Marilyn as was very selfish; showing up late, not being prepared, being on meds etc...

 

What does that say about her? It wasn't only some viewers that couldn't look beyond her body and personality. She couldn't do so either. Yea, like Michael Jackson she never really grew up but that isn't something one should praise, or blame on external factors (that only 'works' for those still in their 20s).

 

 

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I'm only concerned about the on-screen. That off-screen stuff just doesn't do a thing for me. If Marilyn was the most professional of performers, would that really change the opinion? I guess you are focusing on respect more than anything. For me personally, that's not important.

 

Many directors were cruel and classless, but I still like their films.

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I feel the three men are stunted. They are all caught in their own traps. They each see Roslyn as the key to their own freedom. Roslyn is the reason for them to live again or to start living. This can often be the case with woman to man. Man gets caught up in doing his own things and then along comes a woman. A woman forces a man to evaluate his life and its priorities.

 

Gay is a rebellious drifter who never grew up. ****'s life came to end after his wife's death (if I remember correctly). Perce is like Roslyn in that he's a little boy who is looking to be loved, mainly by his mother. Each man is fragile in their own way, just like Roslyn.

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