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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}*Miss Goddess* - I think both of those gals are misunderstood. Carnally misunderstood. Aaaah Hillary Brooke...

>

> Am I diving off a bridge too far if I say:

>

> *Margaret Hamilton* as the Wicked Witch in "The Wizard of Oz"?

 

I actually remembered Maggie at the last minute. She's unforgettable and a "must" for any such top ten list, I believe.

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I wouldn't fault Irena in Cat People because she was cursed. i.e. she wasn't fully responsible for her actions.

 

Hillary Brooke in The Women In Green is a good one. Just saw that (again), a few weeks ago and she is someone I wouldn't want as an enemy. Of course Greer in Out of the Past ranks near the top of any list.

 

 

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Sorry to blurt into the middle of all the other chats.. just wanted to say...

 

A) Miss G.. I watched your sweet Willie Boy tonight in State Fair.. LOVED it!! (and him too) :-)

 

and B) Sorry to hear you are under the weather Mr. Movieman.. feel better soon! :-)

 

Thanks for letting me "blurt", folks..

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Bummer... we've been fighting the "germ-ans" around here at our house too.. for about the last week and a half. Just a nasty cold, (sore throat.. cough.. sinus, sinus.. and MORE sinus drainage.. ICK. Nothing TOO tragic.. but more or less just "un-fun". One of us gets rid of it just about the time another one of us starts catching it.. (I am at the end of the line.. but alas.. it finally caught up with me too)

 

I will pass you all the kleenex.. and you guys can send over some tylenol.. ha. We can all be miserable together. (sniff.. sniff.. achoo) :-)

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I saw the last half hour of State Fair, and just loved it! What a great movie! I was an idiot and forgot to record it too. :(

 

I thought Henry King did a fantastic job. I am a big fan of the 40's version, but I think this one might be better, I'll have to see the whole thing before I decide. I forgot how good Janet Gaynor can be. Because she's cute, I think she has been misjudged as an actress. She hasn't turned in a phony performance in any of the movies I've seen. She can make even the most humble movie work. Lew Ayres has that same quality - the ability to make trite or simple lines work, in other words, sincerity.

 

Will, too, just denotes honesty. I loved how he tossed off his bon mots, sliding them in under the radar sometimes, suddenly I'd be laughing at the line he said 5 minutes before.

 

I thought the mother was a hoot in the carny sideshow scene, where she was staring with unbridled curiosity at the dancing girls, wondering what they were going to do...this is a very different mom than we see in the 40's film with Fay Bainter at MGM.

 

movieman -

 

it's hard enough in a household of females to get a word in edgewise, but with laryngitis? Oh dear. :D

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 9, 2012 7:52 AM

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>Bummer... we've been fighting the "germ-ans" around here at our house too.. for about the last week and a half. Just a nasty cold, (sore throat.. cough.. sinus, sinus.. and MORE sinus drainage.. ICK. Nothing TOO tragic..

 

Me too, for about the past three weeks. I think it's because we all talk so much here, in such close quarters, and we catch each other's colds. We need to wear face masks and swab our keyboards with alcohol or Purell hand sanitizer.

.

.

.

.

.

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:)

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I saw the last half hour of State Fair, and just loved it! What a great movie! I was an idiot and forgot to record it too

 

Aw kid.. sorry you missed it. I only saw it because it was another of my famous "happy accidents" and just happened to tune in when it was starting. I don't think I had even heard of this version before so I was curious and then got more and more into it as I watched.

 

I don't know how it compares to the other versions because I just never have seemed that drawn to them.. but I just like Will's "matter of fact" way of speaking.. and his love for his pig (and his family too.. ha) I found the whole "clan" to be very endearing and I thought all the humor worked (even the "homespun risque" moments.. which I am not USALLY a fan of.. but they did work for me this time.. I liked that the "shoe was on the other foot" so to speak in this one and that it was the farmer's SON that ended up a bit older and wiser this time.. but even so.. the trapeze artist gal was not "bad".. just free spirited.. and I liked that she was portrayed that way) And I l-o-v-e-d LOVED the ending... and the way it tied everything together for the whole family once they got home.

 

All in all.. a fun movie.. glad I caught it. Hope you will get a chance to catch it sometime.

 

PS: Fred.. cough.. sputter.. achoo.. and sniff.. :-)

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Feb 9, 2012 9:54 PM

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The 1945 ending is funnier, stretching out the bet for a longer, more satisfying punch line, but the 1933 ending is more beautiful, with the rain coming down and the way Margie and her beau meet.

 

I just love the part where Margie is about to lose the 5 dollar bet for her dad by saying she was miserable at the fair, but at the last moment the phone rings and it's her boy, and she runs out on the porch and throws her hands up into the air saying it was the most marvelous fair of all! So there, Mr. sourpuss! Ah, I'm a sucker for this simple story, told eloquently.

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CAR-O-LINA! Miss Maven!! Now I need a kleenex for a whole OTHER reason than my sniffly cold!!!

 

They really went all out and found THE most heartwrenching moments didn't they?? Oh golly.. I was hanging on by a veritable THREAD.. until.. (gasp.. sob) Sweet little Bonnie Blue comes riding up.. AGGGGHHHH!!

 

Good gravy..

 

OH the emotion.. now I need another tissue.. or maybe just a hug... ha. :D

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It's done its job then. I thought you and some of the other Ramblers might appreciate seeing Sidney Carlton rounding up the lot.

 

...And I think your honeybunch can give you that much needed hugh. Now rest up and take care of that cold.

 

< Gesundheit! >

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That was a wonderful cross-section of tragic movie scenes...my goodness, it must have taken such effort to put together because as you say, the editing was done with great care.

 

This features only clips from one movie, but it's also edited well and the music fits. I confess it makes me even sadder because the shadows that over "Myra" hung over the actress, my favorite, Vivien Leigh:

 

 

 

Warning: This video contains huge spoilers, if you've never seen *Waterloo Bridge*.

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Oh Miss G.. I love that music that was in the clip you posted.. so "dreamy and hypnotic" and it went beautifully with the scenes from the film.. though I do confess.. I have never seen WB.. but now I want to...

 

PS Miss Maven.. I DID notice dear beloved Sydney C in that mix.. sigh..

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Feb 11, 2012 11:27 AM

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  • 2 weeks later...

Jackie, I watched a movie the other evening that I believe you've said you like: *The Train*. it was the first time I'd seen it. It was pretty good. The ending...well, the whole premise really...kind of made me think. Can all those lives lost be justified for a bunch of paintings?

 

Paul Scofield was good, this is only the second thing I've seen him do (I've seen parts of A Man For All Seasons). But I couldn't take my eyes off of Burt. It was great seeing him repair that train...I could watch him do that for hours. :D He still had it in 1965.

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The Burt Lancaster featurette by John Frankenheimer references "The Train." He was pretty well done with Burt after "Seven Days In May" but did "The Train" as a favor. He then shows a scene that was done in one take where Burt slides down a two story ladder, runs to pull the switch on the tracks and then runs to get on the moving train. He was very complementary about it.

 

I've seen the movie and it does make you think. The Germans were high on getting all the goodies from everyone they invaded. It doesn't make any sense but then much of that war didn't.

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That featurette always made me curious to see *The Train*, if only for that one stunt. :D Burt also did a jump off the moving train, which could be a lot more dangerous. I'm guessing he must have been pushing 50 when this movie was made, so all the physical work that went into his part is really remarkable. I admit I was impressed. :D And I like the drama of Frankenheimer's direction. He knows how to amp up a scene. It wasn't my favorite Burt Lancaster movie, but I'm glad I watched.

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Oh yay! I don't know why I like that movie so much!

 

MissG - there's a scene where Frankenheimer just shows Burt's hands, working on one of the parts, and it is a very long take, without seeing his face at all. Then the camera pans back to show that it has been Burt all along? It always impresses me that he not only did his own stunts, he also welded and worked as a grease monkey! I'm thinking that was the scene you were talking about?

 

Chris, the movie has that questioning feeling that a lot of sixties and seventies movies had, and it doesn't give any answers. I can only say what I think, which is that that adorable engineer, the Bull I think his name was.... he somehow understood the reason why it was important to save those paintings. I don't know if it was worth it, but I am guessing that many wars have been fought over who owns art, since it is a thing of value, sometimes beyond gold or riches. But my emotion goes with the Bull, He started everything rolling, and I can't think he was so very wrong. I wouldn't want him to have died for nothing.

 

It feels like *The Great Escape*, another movie I like, with great attention to the details of an operation. But this one has a kind of subversive message, like *Cool Hand Luke.* Fighting the ruling paradigm and then wondering if you won or lost, or if the winning was actually the losing.

 

There's a war within a war in this picture, the outer part is about WWII, and then the inner war between Scofield and Lancaster. I always like a battle of wits, with a lot of twisty things happening. It seems kind of like a heist movie to me, but in reverse.

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A heist movie in reverse---that's a great description!

 

And yes, that's exactly the scene I was referring to---if I had it on DVD I'd replay it over and over! :D

 

I wish Lancaster and Scofield had more scenes together, I like those battle of wits with well-matched adversaries, too. What's interesting is Scofield's character is portrayed as all mind and Burt's was very physical, for contrast. I actually liked the officer who served under Scofield, he was cute and had more sense than his boss.

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Burt has nice hands.

 

sigh

 

I liked that guy too, the second in command, I think at the end he was the one who told Scofield to just give it up. He was infinitely more human and sensible. Scofield was so driven, beyond any common sense.

 

I like this movie for Scofield's performance, since I think this is one of his few baddies. He's usually very sympathetic to me, if a little cerebral, as you cleverly pointed out, so I enjoyed hating him in The Train.

 

There does seem to be a statement being made in this movie about those who DO and those who can only order others to do. Scofield always seems to be one step behind everyone, even those he looks down on. I think he actually has an inferiority complex, and that's why he feels he has to beat them, especially Lancaster. Well, who wouldn't have an inferiority complex next to Burt? :D Anyway, Scofield is always relying on his underlings to take care of those ambushes and sometimes, one gets a glint of how much the underlings despise and maybe even pity him.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 20, 2012 7:22 PM

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