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Laffitte -

 

I'm really happy you liked Life With Father. It's funny, it's one of those movies that is completely unappealing in it's description, but is so full of great moments when actually watching it that I can never resist it when it's on. I believe that William Powell adds so much love and warmth to the character that it erases the dreadful qualities he exhibits. :D

 

Elizabeth Taylor is so very funny in this one. She would have made a terrific comedienne I think.

 

I am in love with High Sierra and Raoul Walsh.... I don't think there's a more beautiful film made about gangsters, about loneliness, and about freedom vs. incarceration. Walsh is a master of outdoor locations, and one senses the freedom and release in nature from the very first shot of the film right down to the last.

 

I think you should be very proud of the term you coined - the Chien Fatale, :D That dog spells doom for whoever it chooses to love! You are so on target with that! it makes me wish there was a complete genre.... the only other story I can think of with a Chien Fatale is Oliver Twist. :D I don't know if you know it, but that was really Bogie's little dog, named Zero. A great performance if you ask me. :D

 

 

I agree about Shirley MacLaine in Some Came Running, I really dislike the movie but she's just great in it.

 

Your description of the relationship between Edith and Sam in Dodsworth is quite lovely. It's so hard to play decent people well, and Mary Astor does it with such common sense, you have to love her for it. She takes a nothing role and invests it with her whole being. I love how you pointed out that line of Fran's in Dodsworth about 'her people'. Very interesting. Fran is to be pitied I think, not despised. She will end her days a very lonely dissatisfied woman. Sad.

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Wow! You watched some of my very favorites. *High Sierra* is # 114 on my all-time list. *The Big Street* is # 92 and *Some Came Running* is # 72.

 

I can't comment on *Life with Father* just yet. I'm going to try and watch it by this weekend.

 

*HIGH SIERRA (1941)*

 

*I found this middling, I didn?t think too much of really?until the next day and it occurred to me how nice the Ida Lupino character was. Sweet in a way, loyal, with the guy the whole way.*

 

"Marie" is my second favorite Ida Lupino character. She's terrific. She's nothing but loyal.

 

*There was another sweet girl in there too, the lame girl who gets an operation (Joan Leslie) with the help of Bogie. He wants her and when repulsed he exhibits the usual criminal/convict mentality, sour grapes (but at least he didn?t kill anybody).*

 

The heartbreaker! Poor Bogie. But we suckers usually choose the heartbreakers while our "Marie" is right there for us.

 

*Unless Ida's character can slip under the wire somehow and be considered a femme fatale (the definition is not altogether clear to me) then this movie does not have one,*

 

Marie is no femme fatale. The femme fatale would be Velma (Joan Leslie). But she's not completely that.

 

*but I do believe that this is the first and only noir (if it is indeed one) with a Chien Fatale :D:D You just knew that dog was going to have a dubious role here, the way it was given so much attention throughout. You?ll have to indulge me here, Chien Fatale, I really like that, even if I do say so myself. :D*

 

Very good! I think you have created a sub-genre! I know *Port of Shadows* and *Le Notti Bianche* would qualify.

 

*THE BIG STREET (1941)*

 

*This story reminded me a little at that famous novel and most French students are required to read, Manon Lescaut, a poor man who is hopelessly in love with a poor woman, a woman who will never be happy unless living in luxury.*

 

That's exactly the story.

 

*Henry Fonda plays a busboy (and proud of it) and goes by the name of Pinks! Yike, he doesn?t have a chance. But he has a heart of gold and an earnest and constant love that nevertheless gets shaken briefly but is there at the end.*

 

My kind of guy: a sucker. Geez, you watched a lot of "sucker" flicks! Many are similar, actually.

 

*Pinks and (Lucille) get thrown together and they are both quite visible most of the time, but this is really his story. The ending came as a surprise to me.*

 

I just love the ending. The supporting cast in the film is also top-notch. It's definitely my kind of love story.

 

*Lucille (I can?t bring myself to say Lucy) is good looking but I didn?t know that she was THAT good looking. Quite beautiful, yes quite. I sense that her Hollywood career was not what it might have been, and if this is so, it?s probably because the comic side of her was left unnoticed, perhaps even by herself.*

 

I never think of Lucy as beautiful. I think she's attractive, but it's her personality that really makes her so.

 

 

*SOME CAME RUNNING (1961)*

 

*This seemed a jumbled mess until that final quixotic gesture, a most unexpected development that brings the whole movie in focus for me.*

 

This is another film with a fantastic ending. But I love it throughout.

 

*Everybody seems up to no good and David (Frank Sinatra) gets fed up with everything until he sees that purity. The only other ?decent? person was the school teacher but she had long standing pent up issues from the outset and then clammed up to no good effect when she needed to let it out.*

 

I feel Dave (Frank Sinatra), Ginnie (Shirley MacLaine), and Gwen (Martha Hyer) are all good people. They each have their hang-ups, that's all.

 

*Shirley MacLaine's character unprepossessing in the worldly sense, a floozie if you will, but her indomitable child-like innocence and undying capacity for love is an anomaly in this grim cast of characters. She is awfully good, even brilliant. She is worth the whole show.*

 

That's a terrific description of her. She'll love you to the end, but she's not going to be able to hold a deep conversation with you. And if that is something you value, then it's tough to enjoy a life with her. That's where Dave was caught. He was completely stimulated by Gwen, but Gwen had built very high walls and he couldn't knock them down.

 

Is it important to respect the person we are with? Or can a puppy dog kind of love overcome this?

 

*DODSWORTH (1937)*

 

*Second time around for this one, so good.*

 

And this is a film where I find myself in the severe minority on this board. I'm not a fan of this film. It's certainly a good "Madame Bovary" picture, but that's not a story that turns me on.

 

*I love the irony with Fran and her attitude towards Europe. Early she says to Sam, they?re my people, they understand me, to that effect. Later she finds out different in the form of the redoubtable Maria Ouspenskaya, who asks her all sorts of nagging questions, for instance, how old are you? There is a difference between spending a summer at an Italian villa and trying to marry the son of a traditional family. So much for Europe?s understanding.*

 

Excellent point. That was terrific.

 

*Chatterton is so good. I may not warm up to Fran that much but Ruth makes her interesting.*

 

I agree with you. I don't like her at all, and that's a credit to Ruth.

 

*Fran is a human being, not just a bad person, thanks to Ruth.*

 

She's selfish in a very harmful way. Does that make her a bad person? Probably not.

 

*The hurt look on her face as she realizes she has been abandoned will probably always linger when I think of this movie.*

 

I don't feel for her one bit. Actually, I take that back. I did feel for her early on. She put up with her husband's life for the longest time. But how she goes about making up for lost time is reckless. It's very real, though. I know someone just like her.

 

*Edith Cortright in the form of Mary Astor remains for me one of the most appealing characters ever..*

 

I liked her a lot. Her and Sam make for a good couple because of what they both want out of life. Edith is the right kind of woman for Sam and his interests.

 

*That long, deft scene between her and Sam is my favorite. She says to him, "We? ... we?" in her you?re-going-to-take-me-with-you realization and later says to him, "I think I must love you," to which he replies, "And I?m glad of it..." which on the surface doesn?t seem all that romantic but it somehow works perfectly with these two.*

 

I think it's a nice response for a mature kind of love, which theirs is.

 

*I also love the way poor Edith tries to shield Sam from that dreaded phone call from Vienna and later making her I-won?t-let-you-go speech. She doesn?t come across demanding or petulant, she actually makes sense. That?s Edith for you ...*

 

She's a sharply drawn contrast to Fran, which makes it easier for us, the audience, to like her even more.

 

*The movie seems to plod along in the early going and then about a half hour in it becomes electric when Sam and Fran have that conversation as they prepare to retire in the hotel room in France. Fran starts unloading her bombshells and the rest of the way is that bumpy ride.*

 

That's for sure. I think it's a very good "mid-life crisis" film for women. Like I said, I've been around this.

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*Bonjour Jackie, you wrote*:

>I'm really happy you liked Life With Father. It's funny, it's one of those movies that is completely unappealing in it's description, but is so full of great moments when actually watching it that I can never resist it when it's on. I believe that William Powell adds so much love and warmth to the character that it erases the dreadful qualities he exhibits. :D

 

Yes! Thank Heaven (should I even say that, I haven?t been bap-TIZED. Did you notice how they always stressed the second syllable) that this is a comedy or he would have been dreadful indeed. And we know that if anyone as sweet as Vinnie (Irene Dunn) can love him, he can't be all bad. Try telling that to that first maid, though. She was the one who grabbed my attention, then that wonderful conversation at the breakfast table, in part as follows:

 

Vinnie (Irene Dunn): What makes you think you?ll even get into Heaven?

 

Clare (William Powell) Well, I'll make a devil of a row if I don?t.

 

Corny? Yes. So why am I laughing? Because everything in this film works. I chuckled at that line. Once the tone of the film establishes itself, you?re done and everything seems to fall into place.

 

>Elizabeth Taylor is so very funny in this one. She would have made a terrific comedienne I think.

 

I do too. And who would have thought that! She has great timing and demeanor. Her precocious beauty and that sweet, more-than-girlish, girlish voice doesn't hurt either. Boy, if I was Clarence, I would agree to write first without a quibble. ('course I?m a damn fool :D )

 

>That dog spells doom for whoever it chooses to love! You are so on target with that! it makes me wish there was a complete genre.... the only other story I can think of with a Chien Fatale is Oliver Twist. :D I don't know if you know it, but that was really Bogie's little dog, named Zero. A great performance if you ask me. :D

 

I understand that the dog got upset and after that ?performance? he wanted his name changed from Zero to Ten (ouch! sorry---and I'[n not even watching the Olympics). Bogey's Dog? I didn?t know, what a great piece of trivia. Wow, you and Frank are rattling off Chien Fatales like wildfire :)

 

>I agree about Shirley MacLaine in Some Came Running, I really dislike the movie but she's just great in it.

 

Did you see how pale she got when he popped the question. How did she do that! :)

 

 

*Bonjour Monsieur Frank, you wrote:*

 

>I can't comment on Life with Father just yet. I'm going to try and watch it by this weekend.

 

I hope you like it. Frank, if you're seeing this on DVD, please do something for me. Nab a screenshot of the first maid and post it. Pleeeaase. You can't miss her. She?ll be holding a tray, looking more or less in the direction of the camera, and she'll be petrified. :D.

 

>Marie is no femme fatale. The femme fatale would be Velma (Joan Leslie). But she's not completely that.

 

Okay, good, thanks for clearing that up. Had Velma's part of the story been developed a little more she would have qualified perhaps, maybe we can call her a pre-femme fatale. :D Just as well, we can?t have her upstaging the dog. :)

 

>Very good! I think you have created a sub-genre! I know Port of Shadows and Le Notti Bianche would qualify.

 

Thanks to you and Jackie for puffing up foolish laffite who shamelessly solicits praise for such nonsense. ;) Still, I heard Asta got jealous. :D

 

>I just love the ending (The Big Street). The supporting cast in the film is also top-notch. It's definitely my kind of love story.

 

The ending was very satisfying. I was surprised but not disappointed. I seem to remember something beautiful about it, even ethereal.

 

>I never think of Lucy as beautiful. I think she's attractive, but it's her personality that really makes her so.

 

I don?t think I did either. I think she was beautiful in this picture. She has the eyes, the cheekbones, and I hope that I don?t sound silly here but there is something about her lip scape that is associated with the Classically Beautiful Woman. Please check the screencap in my original post. But I concede, she's not normally considered a great beauty, I know.

 

>And this is a film (Dodsworth). where I find myself in the severe minority on this board. I'm not a fan of this film It's certainly a good "Madame Bovary" picture, but that's not a story that turns me on.

 

I like the way we're bringing French literature into this conversation, Frank. First, Madame Lescaut in The Big Street, and now Madame Bovary. They both fit. To coin a phrase and no pun intended, this movie is not always a pretty picture. But it?s cinematically a good story.

.

>She's a sharply drawn contrast to Fran, which makes it easier for us, the audience, to like her even more.

 

This is a very good point. There is something intrinsically pleasant about Edith but Fran makes her look better yet. Jackie correctly pointed out how Astor was able to make something out of Edith with very little to work with. Again, an assist from the Fran character, but let's not forget how well Astor did as well. And let?s never forget that Laffite will always love Edith Cortright. :D

 

>She'll (Ginnie/Shirley MacLaine in Some Came Running) love you to the end, but she's not going to be able to hold a deep conversation with you.

 

You mean like this: :)

 

Did you like it?

 

I liked it fine ... I mean I really liked it a lot.

 

That means you didn't like it very much.

 

No, really, I liked it a lot. Golly, just think, you can put those words down on paper like that. All I can do is pin down brassieres. (smiling) It makes me feel like a failure. (smiling)

 

(firmly) What did you like about it, Ginny?

 

Everything!

 

Like what?

 

Well, I really like the people.

 

(losing patience) WHAT People?

 

ALL of them.

 

(pause, mounting exasperation) Okay, so you like all of the people. What does the story mean to you?

 

(groping slightly for words) Well ... it means a lot. (nodding her head with satisfaction)

 

(throwing the magazine on the coffee table) Well, then, TELL me what it?s ABOUT.

 

Now, don?t get mad. Every time I open my mouth you get mad at me.

 

(loudly) You didn?t understand a word of what I said. You don?t understand the story at all.

 

No, I don?t, but that don?t mean I don?t like it. I don?t understand you either but that don?t mean I don?t like you. I LOVE you. But I don?t understand you. What?s the matter than that?

 

>Is it important to respect the person we are with? Or can a puppy dog kind of love overcome this?

 

David says too (DeanM) "I'm tired of being lonely, that's all. And the way she feels about me, well, no body ever felt that way about me before, besides maybe I can help her. I sure can't help myself." But it?s hard to think that this marriage would have lasted if they were real people.

 

PS: Frank, I?m serious about the screen cap. I would really appreciate it. The Petrified Maid, thank you. :)

 

===

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*Yes! Thank Heaven (should I even say that, I haven?t been bap-TIZED. Did you notice how they always stressed the second syllable) that this is a comedy or he would have been dreadful indeed. And we know that if anyone as sweet as Vinnie (Irene Dunn) can love him, he can't be all bad. Try telling that to that first maid, though. She was the one who grabbed my attention, then that wonderful conversation at the breakfast table, in part as follows:*

 

*Vinnie (Irene Dunn): What makes you think you?ll even get into Heaven?*

 

*Clare (William Powell) Well, I'll make a devil of a row if I don?t.*

 

*Corny? Yes. So why am I laughing? Because everything in this film works. I chuckled at that line. Once the tone of the film establishes itself, you?re done and everything seems to fall into place.*

 

You are right. Something about the very sure and swift way the material was handled makes this one work so well. It's deft, perhaps because it had been done on Broadway for so long they worked out every little kink and flaw. But of course, it isn't always the case in Hollywood that a great play makes a great movie. Other plays have been ruined by their screen treatment.

 

The business with the rubber plant, the way Vinnie does math, father's pants, the violin playing, it all works flawlessly. Each actor completely invested in their role.... I never would have said that Powell or Dunne could have played this, if I hadn't seen it for myself. Their characters are so different from what they usually played... but together, they are perfection. Each of them make sense to themselves, just not to the other one! :D It's tough to do comedy, but I think this play is pretty perfectly written to get the maximum humor out of the situations. No wonder it ran for years on Broadway. It's pretty foolproof.

 

And yes, poor Jimmy Lydon is fighting a losing battle with Liz. He should never have listened to his father. :D

 

 

*I understand that the dog got upset and after that ?performance? he wanted his name changed from Zero to Ten (ouch! sorry---and I'[n not even watching the Olympics). Bogey's Dog? I didn?t know, what a great piece of trivia. Wow, you and Frank are rattling off Chien Fatales like wildfire :)*

 

D'oh! I didn't even remember a dog in Le Notti Bianche! I wish I'd thought of Port of Shadows. I think TCM programmer should take note of your idea, and schedule a day of Chiennes Fatales! It's a wonderful sub-category.

 

Dogs play a big role in some of Ford's films, but I don't know that they really fit the bill...I was thinking of the dog in The Searchers, Debbie's companion when she hides. The sound of dogs barking or whining is used a lot in Ford's films as precursors to violence.

 

The sad thing about Velma is that she's just a flesh and blood girl, actually kind of low rent. Because of her youth, she symbolized something clean and pure to Roy, he built her up in his mind into something far different than the reality. He's lucky he didn't actually marry her. She reminds me of Virginia Mayo in *Best Years of Our Lives*, only a little less so, like a tramp in training. Velma just wants to make up for lost time, which we can understand, and her parents just don't have the ability to discipline her..in fact they can't even see her flaws after all they've been through. One could say the operation actually ruined her character, though I suspect her character was malformed from the beginning,... we can only see it after her body is fixed. It's quite a spin on the traditional crippled character. It's such a pathetic situation though - just as in Chaplin's City Lights, Roy's goodwill and help only manage to point out Velma's flaws while taking Velma right out of his league. I love the spin that Walsh gives it, by making Velma so inferior in every way on closer examination.

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I love *Life With Father*. It's a favorite of mine since I was a kid. Curtiz's direction and Powell's hilarious depiction are my reasons why.

 

And yes, I have always thought Elizabeth should have done more screwball comedy. Here and in *Little Women* she is so good at playing dippy while being utterly charming. I love it when she widens her (stunningly beautiful) eyes. I also find her quite funny in certain scenes of *Giant*.

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I did not realize it was Michael Curtiz. It's a splendid production in every way, and even quite moving at moments. Powell is just wonderful in a role that a good many actors probably wanted to play.

 

Liz is terribly funny in Little Women, she steals the picture as far as I'm concerned, with her little mistakes with language. I think she must have been hilarious to talk to in real life with a great sense of humor.

 

I find the scenes in Giant where she is kind of teasing/arguing with Bick very funny. Even the section where she berates the men for being cavemen has a kind of humor to it.

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*I did not realize it was Michael Curtiz. It's a splendid production in every way, and even quite moving at moments. Powell is just wonderful in a role that a good many actors probably wanted to play.*

 

Powell is amazing...it's such a true "character", not at all the urbane type he usually played (and which Mr. Day would have extremely disapproved of).

 

Curtiz showed he was rather good at "Americana" and warm family depictions, which isn't how I'm accustomed to think of him as a director.

 

*Liz is terribly funny in Little Women, she steals the picture as far as I'm concerned, with her little mistakes with language. I think she must have been hilarious to talk to in real life with a great sense of humor.*

 

I think she had great humor and liked to laugh, and the best roles allowed that side of her to come through.

 

For me she's the main reason I ever watch that version of *LW*.

 

*I find the scenes in Giant where she is kind of teasing/arguing with Bick very funny. Even the section where she berates the men for being cavemen has a kind of humor to it.*

 

Right! I love how she gently teases Bick, it's hilarious.

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Well hello there, Monsieur Laffite, Nice to see you around these parts again, sir.

 

It's been fun to pop in here and read your comments on all your recently watched movies. I am enjoying the conversation you have going on and am happy to say I have even seen a few of the movies you mentioned. I especially like Life With Father (I am with Jackie.. I can't help but watch it anytime it is on) it is about as funny as any movie of that style I can think of.. and I love the way HE thinks he is the head of his household.. but, ha. everyone else, (especially mom) is working behind the scenes to get what they want too.

 

And I really enjoyed High Sierra when I saw it a couple of years ago.. but have not got as good a mental picture of it anymore to be able to say a WHOLE lot.. ha. (except I DO remember that dog!)

 

Meanwhile.. I wanted to comment on this:

 

SOME CAME RUNNING (1961) ...Shirley MacLaine's character unprepossessing in the worldly sense, a floozie if you will, but her indomitable child-like innocence and undying capacity for love is an anomaly in this grim cast of characters. She is awfully good, even brilliant. She is worth the whole show.

 

She is all you say and MORE in this film. And that (for me) is saying a lot because to be honest.. I am no huge Shirley fan. But wowsa.. she is truly a stand-out in this movie. UTTERLY charming (in such an annoying sort of way) and totally heartbreaking there at the end. (oh me.. )

 

Thanks for the fun read. (You and everyone else, for that matter)

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*PS: Frank, I?m serious about the screen cap. I would really appreciate it. The Petrified Maid, thank you. :)*

 

The version of the film that I have is public domain and the colors are nearly washed away, alas. But here's your petrified Annie (Heather Wilde):

 

lifewithfather1_zpsd836f78c.jpg

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>Well hello there, Monsieur Laffite, Nice to see you around these parts again, sir.

 

Thank you so much, Ro. Hope to see more of you around here too. I know how it is, life starts happening and says, no you can't do that right now. (sigh)

 

>It's been fun to pop in here and read your comments on all your recently watched movies. I am enjoying the conversation you have going on and am happy to say I have even seen a few of the movies you mentioned.

 

You probably do better than me with that. Everyone publishes lists around here and I generally find there are only few I've seen. I'll never catch up.

 

>I especially like Life With Father (I am with Jackie.. I can't help but watch it anytime it is on) it is about as funny as any movie of that style I can think of.. and I love the way HE thinks he is the head of his household.. but, ha. everyone else, (especially mom) is working behind the scenes to get what they want too.

 

This was a dark horse for me. I'm surprised I liked it so much. I don't watch a lot of family films, per se. Thanks for checking in on this one, I'm betting that MissGreer likes it as well. Well, of course, you laidies _would_ like it. I'm beginning to feel like a traitor to the so-called stronger sex for even liking this movie. You won't tell anyone, will you. ;)

 

>And I really enjoyed High Sierra when I saw it a couple of years ago.. but have not got as good a mental picture of it anymore to be able to say a WHOLE lot.. ha. (except I DO remember that dog!)

 

That dog should get a high billing. Gee, I wonder if he's even credited. :D

 

>She is all you say and MORE in this film. And that (for me) is saying a lot because to be honest.. I am no huge Shirley fan. But wowsa.. she is truly a stand-out in this movie. UTTERLY charming (in such an annoying sort of way) and totally heartbreaking there at the end. (oh me.. )

 

Truly wonderful, she was! It was probably overkill to print out that whole conversation at the end but it was entertaining and she did so well. And what happened right after that was quite touching. Gosh, I've really gotten sappy lately, what's happened to me. I'd better start practicing my swordsmanship again, maybe I can get out out of this rut? :D

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Jackie, you wrote:

>I didn't even remember a dog in Le Notti Bianche!

 

Just briefly, as I recall, there was a dog lapping at the heels of Marcello in the beginning as he ambled about, very early on, prior to even meeting the girl.

 

And the very end the long shot just before the closing credits, Marcello in the distance after his disappointment, idly playing around with the dog. I had an idea that the movie wanted to indicate that Marcello was not completely crushed by losing the girl to the returning lodger and was able to at least lavish a little attention to the dog, but I doubt Visconti had that in mind.

 

>I think TCM programmer should take note of your idea, and schedule a day of Chiennes Fatales! It's a wonderful sub-category.

 

I?ll let them know :D No, not really. You know, I wouldn't be surprised if they've done something like that already, something with animals, etc.

 

>The sad thing about Velma is that she's just a flesh and blood girl, actually kind of low rent. Because of her youth, she symbolized something clean and pure to Roy, he built her up in his mind into something far different than the reality. He's lucky he didn't actually marry her. She reminds me of Virginia Mayo in Best Years of Our Lives, only a little less so, like a tramp in training. Velma just wants to make up for lost time, which we can understand, and her parents just don't have the ability to discipline her..in fact they can't even see her flaws after all they've been through. One could say the operation actually ruined her character, though I suspect her character was malformed from the beginning,... we can only see it after her body is fixed. It's quite a spin on the traditional crippled character. It's such a pathetic situation though - just as in Chaplin's City Lights, Roy's goodwill and help only manage to point out Velma's flaws while taking Velma right out of his league. I love the spin that Walsh gives it, by making Velma so inferior in every way on closer examination.

 

Wonderful in-depth Velma, you did a better job of covering Velma than the movie does. :) I was shocked to see the AFTER version of Velma. I was doing double takes. Does the movie want me to really believe that this is Velma? :) Boy, she sure learned how to dance in a hurry. Picking up grease-balls at the Dance Hall. What happened to that sweet girl? No trace. And Roy hardly seemed to notice.

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>The version of the film that I have is public domain and the colors are nearly washed away, alas. But here's your petrified Annie (Heather Wilde):

 

Thank you, Frank! Miss Heather Wilde! That was quite a good frame you chose. What does public domain mean, it's from a local public library perhaps? Anyway, thank you.

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I remember the dog now! Yes, thank you. I wonder if the dog symbolized Marcello's own, un-loved, un-owned mongrel status? Everyone in the movie has someone, except him. He and the dog parted ways, to find a little comfort or solace with someone, only to be booted out into the lonely night again.

 

Isn't it odd? I'm finding a lot of comparison and connections between High Sierra and Le Notti Bianche and Some Came Running. Characters who build up dreams of a life, someone to share it with... but are those dreams even true? Are the people even worth the effort? We have also been talking about Letter from an Unknown Woman at the other site,,,which also deals with these kinds of romantic thoughts or delusions. Or are they delusions? Perhaps they get us through life? Help us to strive for something better? I don't know.

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"Life With Father" is such a treat. You made me laugh when you said Powell thinks he is the head of the house. How many husbands have lived under that misguided notion?

 

He's just barely under being over-the-top. There are many funny scenes but one of my favorites is when he and Irene are alone near the end and he tells her how much he loves her. She says something like "I've waited 30 years to hear that." (or however many years it was.) I'm sure she knew it all along.

 

Also, I think the underlying theme of his baptism is treated so well. No one gets really mad and even when Powell gets so close you can tell he couldn't be mad at her for long.

 

My funniest scene is Clarence, Jr and Elizabeth trying to play music. They're not familiar with each other's hymns and then apologize for belonging to the wrong religion. Anything to make an impression.

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>I remember the dog now! Yes, thank you. I wonder if the dog symbolized Marcello's own, un-loved, un-owned mongrel status?

 

Why not? I was going to say that myself but thought I might be reading too much. But if not, that idea might tie in with the finale ...

 

>Isn't it odd? I'm finding a lot of comparison and connections between High Sierra and Le Notti Bianche and Some Came Running. Characters who build up dreams of a life, someone to share it with... but are those dreams even true? Are the people even worth the effort?

 

Spiritual teachers and religious leaders are always saying that all desire inevitably leads to disappointment. They say, practice detachment, don't want anything too much. Then if you get it, it will come as a gift and you will be happy because you won't be afraid to lose it, easy come, easy go. Have those dreams if you must be keep some distance. Don't grasp, don't be in a state of want. Trouble is, if movies were made with characters like this, the stories might be boring. I read something recently that Paddy Cheyefsky said, to the effect that movies are what people want and what they are willing to do to get it. Simple, but so true. Okay lecture, over; now, back to those delusions... :)

 

>We have also been talking about Letter from an Unknown Woman at the other site,,,which also deals with these kinds of romantic thoughts or delusions. Or are they delusions? Perhaps they get us through life? Help us to strive for something better? I don't know.

 

That would be good one to revisit. Great story. There is an Asian version of this that was made much more recently. I remember one scene in particular that really grabbed me. I remember reading reviews at the time and there was overwhelming preference for the Ophuls, but I remember liking the other as well.

 

Edited by: laffite on Feb 21, 2014 11:42 AM

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>Awwww. Bronxie, THANK you! I love my sweet Charles Lane. I hope when I'm 100, I am as sweet underneath the sour as he was (but I doubt it). I hope you and Rudy had a wonderful Valentines Day! :D

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Jackie! Rudy made me his famous

spaghetti and meatballs, but we didn't finish it, if you know what I mean, lol. (ghostly visitations can be fun!)

 

I can't believe I forgot THE MARK, with my sweet-eyed Stuart, was on this afternoon. Drat! Godfrey Daniel! I was too stupidly busy gorging on the shopping channel salivating over Italian jewelry. Is this the movie where Rod Steiger has an Irish accent? (just can't imagine...)

 

I have never been able to watch SOME CAME RUNNING in its entirety, for the life of me, it seems. I give it up less than halfway through every darn time! Why is a mystery to me.

 

Ah, LIFE WITH FATHER. One of my favorites. Let's not forget Max Steiner's superlative score -- blustery, affectionate, nostalgic. I love it!

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Feb 21, 2014 9:53 PM

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I just saw *One Foot in Heaven* and wonder if the "Elmwood Church" at the movie's end was the Hollywood Methodist Church on Franklin Street that's the first thing you see coming into downtown from the hills by bus? That did not look like a movie set building and they seem very similar. The Catholic church, where I went to Mass while at the Festival, was equally as beautiful; I'm glad I didn't have to choose which one impressed me the most. I'm certain that other faiths have their houses of worship there I missed seeing. So much for "Godless Hollywood!"

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>I just saw One Foot in Heaven and woner if the "Elmwood Church" at the movie's end was the Hollywood Methodist Church on Franklin Street that's the first thing you see coming into downtown from the hills by bus?

 

 

Wouldbe,

 

Good eye!

 

hollywoodunitedmethodistchurch.jpg

 

Yes, it was the First United Methodist Church on Franklin at Highland. That church is also in *The War of the Worlds*.

 

Another church used is the Wilshire United Methodist which is located on Wilshire on the way to downtown LA.

 

ls.jpg

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_Hola, Laffite_ -- *Okay, good, thanks for clearing that up. Had Velma's part of the story been developed a little more she would have qualified perhaps, maybe we can call her a pre-femme fatale. :D Just as well, we can?t have her upstaging the dog. :)*

 

:D I'd have to watch the film again to see if Velma (Joan Leslie) was really leading Roy (Humphrey Bogart) on or not. I know Roy was placing a great deal of his hopes on her. The older, protective male looking for young, appreciative love. It's as if he could be her "savior." She was his "second chance." The delusions of love.

 

*Thanks to you and Jackie for puffing up foolish laffite who shamelessly solicits praise for such nonsense. ;) Still, I heard Asta got jealous. :D*

 

That made me laugh!

 

*The ending was very satisfying. I was surprised but not disappointed. I seem to remember something beautiful about it, even ethereal.*

 

"Ethereal" is the perfect word for it. You have a way with words.

 

*I don?t think I did either. I think she was beautiful in this picture. She has the eyes, the cheekbones, and I hope that I don?t sound silly here but there is something about her lip scape that is associated with the Classically Beautiful Woman. Please check the screencap in my original post. But I concede, she's not normally considered a great beauty, I know.*

 

I love the physical breakdown of Lucy! I'm not sure if it's her eyes or her lips or a combination of both that keeps me from saying she was beautiful. I'm usually not fond of "big" eyes. But I love her personality.

 

*I like the way we're bringing French literature into this conversation, Frank. First, Madame Lescaut in The Big Street, and now Madame Bovary. They both fit. To coin a phrase and no pun intended, this movie is not always a pretty picture. But it?s cinematically a good story.*

 

I know *Dodsworth* is a film that is really liked on this board. My issue is with Fran. I guess there's some hypocrisy found with me and a woman's mid-life crisis, because film noir is loaded with male mid-life crises and I like those.

 

*This is a very good point. There is something intrinsically pleasant about Edith but Fran makes her look better yet. Jackie correctly pointed out how Astor was able to make something out of Edith with very little to work with. Again, an assist from the Fran character, but let's not forget how well Astor did as well. And let?s never forget that Laffite will always love Edith Cortright. :D*

 

I generally like Mary in everything. She has a quiet, "tired" approach. She's almost always the "mature" one in the room. She plays selfless well. She's an early version of Deborah Kerr, an actress I really like.

 

I watched *Other Men's Women* recently and I was pleasantly surprised to see a more playful Mary Astor. I also love this about her in *Across the Pacific*. She's terrific in that film.

 

*You mean like this: :)*

 

*Did you like it?*

 

*I liked it fine ... I mean I really liked it a lot.*

 

*That means you didn't like it very much.*

 

*No, really, I liked it a lot. Golly, just think, you can put those words down on paper like that. All I can do is pin down brassieres. (smiling) It makes me feel like a failure. (smiling)*

 

*(firmly) What did you like about it, Ginny?*

 

*Everything!*

 

*Like what?*

 

*Well, I really like the people.*

 

*(losing patience) WHAT People?*

 

*ALL of them.*

 

*(pause, mounting exasperation) Okay, so you like all of the people. What does the story mean to you?*

 

*(groping slightly for words) Well ... it means a lot. (nodding her head with satisfaction)*

 

*(throwing the magazine on the coffee table) Well, then, TELL me what it?s ABOUT.*

 

*Now, don?t get mad. Every time I open my mouth you get mad at me.*

 

*(loudly) You didn?t understand a word of what I said. You don?t understand the story at all.*

 

*No, I don?t, but that don?t mean I don?t like it. I don?t understand you either but that don?t mean I don?t like you. I LOVE you. But I don?t understand you. What?s the matter than that?*

 

Precisely! I absolutely love that scene. It explains Dave and Ginnie and their desires. Dave's ego is craving an intellectual response to his writing. That's Gwen. But Ginnie doesn't give one hoot about his writings. She loves him, not his writing or any other kind of brilliance. She's the puppy dog that is going to leap on Dave when he comes home. But is that enough?

 

It's kind of like telling a woman she is beautiful all the time but nothing else. For some women, that's enough. But there are many others that crave something more.

 

*David says too (DeanM) "I'm tired of being lonely, that's all. And the way she feels about me, well, no body ever felt that way about me before, besides maybe I can help her. I sure can't help myself." But it?s hard to think that this marriage would have lasted if they were real people.*

 

I completely agree with you. There is pity with Dave's words. Dave is attempting to fool himself into thinking he doesn't need the intellectual/ego stimulation. What would end up happening is that Dave would start to hate Ginnie's pure love for him. His own guilt would fuel this hate.

 

Can you love someone you don't respect?

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>I'd have to watch the film again to see if Velma (Joan Leslie) was really leading Roy (Humphrey Bogart) on or not. I know Roy was placing a great deal of his hopes on her. The older, protective male looking for young, appreciative love. It's as if he could be her "savior." >She was his "second chance." The delusions of love.

 

No, she wasn't. I remember being sort of proud of her for sticking to her guns about saying no to him, especially after the success of the operation when she might have felt guilty about saying no as firmly she did. She admitted to her parents, "I don't love him." More importantly, I'm quite sure there was no innuendo or mixed messages that she might have been feeding Roy for the sport or tease of it. That's how I remember it. We only saw what Jackie so aptly termed the "low rent" or "tramp in training" Velma in her last scene with the boyfriend where she turns him down again. I think she was straight with him all the way. So, you were right in your original comment to the effect that she wasn't really in the story enough to termed a femme fatale. My designation "pre-femme fatale" was a jest meaning would-be femme fatale (but not quite) , or perhaps you knew that.

 

*Frank*

>I absolutely love that scene. It explains Dave and Ginnie and their desires. Dave's ego is craving an intellectual response to his writing. That's Gwen. But Ginnie doesn't give one hoot about his writings. She loves him, not his writing or any other kind of brilliance. She's the puppy dog that is going to leap on Dave when he comes home. But is that enough?......It's kind of like telling a woman she is beautiful all the time but nothing else. For some women, that's enough. But there are many others that crave something more.

 

 

*laffite*

>David says too (DeanM) "I'm tired of being lonely, that's all. And the way she feels about me, well, no body ever felt that way about me before, besides maybe I can help her. I sure can't help myself." But it?s hard to think that this marriage would have lasted if they were real people.

 

*Frank*

>I completely agree with you. There is pity with Dave's words. Dave is attempting to fool himself into thinking he doesn't need the intellectual/ego stimulation. What would end up happening is that Dave would start to hate Ginnie's pure love for him. His own guilt would fuel this hate......Can you love someone you don't respect?

 

:) Maybe he experienced an epiphany. He suddenly realized that love is not predicated in what you know, what you can do, or even in what you can understand. He suddenly saw things they way she saw things and wanted the same thing. Love is something you can't understand, but perhaps only what you can know inwardly and feel. He can get his intellectual/ego stimulation elsewhere, he doesn't need to get it from her because he loves her the way she is. Maybe he doesn't see her as a puppy dog :)

 

Edited by: laffite on Feb 24, 2014 12:32 AM

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*laffite wrote:*

>:) Maybe he experienced an epiphany. He suddenly realized that love is not predicated in what you know, what you can do, or even in what you can understand. He suddenly saw things they way she saw things and wanted the same thing. Love is something you can't understand, but perhaps only what you can know inwardly and feel. He can get his intellectual/ego stimulation elsewhere, he doesn't need to get it from her because he loves her the way she is. Maybe he doesn't see her as a puppy dog :)

 

Hi Frank, I threw this out but couldn't get you to bite :) However, I do want to say something about this and then we can re-put the capper on this one. Just that some of those things that Dave said to friend (DeanM) contain the seeds of what is popularly referred to as a spiritual experience, a new way of looking at things; realizing that we might not know what is really in our own best interest, helping others, etc, and although I am sort of pleased with looking at Dave that way I have to admit at the same time, it's a guilty pleasure because normally I find myself on the other side of the question, i.e. the cynic/realist/don't-really-believe-in-all-that-crap school...One last harrowing thought. Suppose they rode off into the sunset at story's end and then one day sometime later, having an after-dinner drink on the veranda, she should casually say to him, "Oh, did I ever tell you about my conversation with that school teacher. It was just before you proposed to me, I told her about us and she had the most awful look on her face." So much for spiritual experience. Instead, I think we're looking at homicide. But that's another movie, one let's hope that never gets made. :D

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Laffite, I just want you to know, I love what you wrote about Some Came Running, and about his 'quasi' religious experience, his ability to view himself from above the scene a bit. I think you are right that he doesn't see her anymore as just a dog or a lead weight, and maybe to see she might be good for him. That all sounds exactly spot on to me, the way I see the movie. don't think he could ever love her the way she loves him, but I think he is coming to love her selflessness, and is trying to take a lesson from it.

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