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what your husband would say

 

Oh he is usually on MY side. ha. Lucky for both of us.. we look a the world in a pretty similar fashion.. at least where movies are concerned. ha. As for all OTHER stuff... well.  We USUALLY do agree.. but if not.. then he just likes to quote his favorite line from TQM (and then he goes off looking for a "good stick") ha. :D

 

As for me and everyone else... well... of COURSE I am agreeable.  See.. it says so in my survey results. HA!! :D

 

 

Of course.. sometimes... even when one is as agreeable a person as I am.. you will still have to pull out a hat pin now and then to keep OTHER certain folks in line. It's a public service kinda thing. (Hmm.. that must be my  "58% CONSCIENTIOUS" side coming out in me.)  HA!

:P

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Miss G (and my fellow "ramblers" too).

 

I hope you won't mind if I take a moment and share a Memorial Day weekend post here, but we had the tv on in the background this morning, and as I was puttering about the house, it caught my attention and I began to sit down and watch for a bit.. The Longest Day.

 

Now I have to tell you that I am not a huge "war movie" person.. but there are some that I have truly been impressed by and there are some films that I think are very excellent depictions of war, and the struggles men (and women) have gone through in battle on behalf of their country and all they hold dear. This film would be among the best, in my opinion. It is filled with little "stories" of the events of D-day (rather than one long running plot line) and it is a great way to depict all the various events that went on throughout that entire day, as the allied forces arrived and began to move in from the beach at Normandy.

 

I have seen bits and pieces of this film in the past, but never watched much of it all the way through. And one thing that I have to say really caught my attention more today than ever before was the need for the men in charge to command, rally, motivate, and yes.. even browbeat their troops to keep going. Repeatedly the officers of higher rank were called upon to lead their troops forward in the face of certain death. And they did it time and again.. for one reason only: if they fell back, then it all would have been for naught.

 

And you know.. seeing it on tv.. in the comfort of our living rooms can really be a bit deceptive. We get so used to those sorts of dramatic moments (both big and small) all shown on tv and in the movies as if it were just so much "entertainment" and we often get desensitized to what it must have REALLY been like for those men. It is easy to just pass it off as just another moment in the story.

 

But stop for a minute to think of it. Imagine what it must have been like to be so responsible and carry such a heavy weight as the lives of so many men of lower rank.. and to know that you must move them forward. You must push them ahead, in the face of heavy fire.. you must conquer your own fears AND theirs too, and you must make them go where any reasonable human would NEVER choose to go. It is YOUR job to lead them to the goal ahead. You must make those command decisions. You MUST.

 

And you know, there were several characters in this film who were shown to have done just that.. over and over again. Many were actual historical people being portrayed by some very famous actors of the day. (including Lt. Col. Benjamin Vandervoort, Commander 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Reg, portrayed by my personal favorite, John Wayne) But the character that really stood out for me in this film was Robert Mitchum's portrayal of Brigadier General Norman Cota, Asst. Commander 29th Infantry Div. He was really something.

 

One of the best lines in the whole film was delivered by him as the troops under his command were hunkered down, taking cover.. waiting for whatever was going to happen next. "There are only two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are already dead and those that are gonna die. Now get off your butts, you're the fightin' 29th."

 

And that was JUST what those men needed to hear.. at just the time they needed to hear it. And even though many of them were wounded.. some no longer even had their guns... they got up, man after man, and gathered whatever weapons they could find laying about the beach among the dead.. and moved on.

 

Wow.. what a moment in the story. But even more, what a moment. Because really.. this happened time and again, all throughout that day, as our brave men on that beach fought.. hunkered down.. regrouped... and moved forward. Very humbling to think of it all.. as I sit here in the comfort of my living room couch. Very humbling indeed.

 

Oh me.. I confess, this ended up being a bit longer post than I planned, but if you are still with me and reading all this.. thanks for letting me share it all with you. I just really was overwhelmed by the emotions of the very thought of what it must have been like for everyone that day. And I am so thankful too, for their eventual success at Normandy. It was the largest seaborne invasion in history with staggering death tolls and exceedingly high casualties. Just the thought of wave after wave after wave (after wave) of men coming up on that beach.. and dropping down from the air is overwhelming. God bless these men (like General Cota.. and many of the other officers and leaders) who were on the beach that day.. and who did so much to motivate the men who did even more on our behalf.  

 

Happy Memorial Day, everyone.
 

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I've always been in awe of anyone who went through that or any other battle. Last night I watched a documentary on a group of men from Bedford, VA. (The National D-Day Memorial is in their town.) One talked of how they often had to improvise their movement because so many of their leaders had been killed or wounded that it was left to them. Imagine being 21 and pinned down by heavy German fire and think about how you are going to get off the beach.

 

He talked of the terrible sound that is made when a bullet hits a body. How you had to go against your instinct to move ahead. I've heard others talk of the randomness of those being killed and marvel, and at times overcome with guilt, on the fact that you weren't one of them.

 

Bedford had the highest per capita casualty count of any town in America on D-Day. There weren't very many from the town in the first place but they lost more than half of them.

 

It's amazing what men and women will do when they have to.

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You are right, it IS amazing.

 

Imagine being 21 and pinned down by heavy German fire and think about how you are going to get off the beach.

 

I can't even begin to imagine it (and 21 was ever so long ago for me.) You'd think by now I'd be old enough to have enough "life experience" that it wouldn't be so mind boggling, ha. But the fact is.. it does just that. boggle the mind, for me think of what it must have been like for those who were faced with all they went through just to come up onto that beach. Amazing, indeed. 

 

Bedford had the highest per capita casualty count of any town in America on D-Day. There weren't very many from the town in the first place but they lost more than half of them

 

What a staggering statistic. How does a town, or a group of people.. or even a family move forward in the face of such a loss? I have lost a few younger members of my own extended family (one, an infant nephew and the other a teenage cousin) over the years and I know the toll it can take on everyone to go through the loss of someone you love that way.. but wow. To lose more than half of your entire town's sons (and possibly some daughter's too). There was no one who was untouched, by that I am sure.I imagine there were some who (for whatever reason) had a stronger foothold,in life that were able to pick up and go forward from there, eventually. But I can hardly fathom it. I am sure it must have been overwhelming for all of them to some degree. Wowsa.  

 

Thanks for sharing the details about the documentary. I did not see it, and I have never heard of the National D-Day Memorial either, so will have to check it out. 

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Seeing the D Day film there again was that famous clip of a couple of guys running up the beach and one of them, just left of center screen, gets hit and goes down. I always thought that he may be the most famous war death ever scene because that clip is shown almost anytime D Day is mentioned. Somewhere, someone must know his name. I'd be interested to know who that poor man was because he, to me, represents all those who died that day. There were nearly 2500 US deaths that day but he is the one we see.

 

http://www.ddaymuseum.co.uk/d-day/d-day-and-the-battle-of-normandy-your-questions-answered#casualities

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Mr. Movieman.. not sure if you intended it this way, but the link  you posted is actually for a different museum.. (in what I think is Great Britain) :)

 

But ha.. it was actually pretty cool to see it because as Americans, we sometimes think we have cornered the market on those sorts of things, but really, the boys "over there" all were dying and fighting for their countries too and it was fun to see a website devoted to honoring their memories as well. :)

 

Somewhere, someone must know his name. I'd be interested to know who that poor man was because he, to me, represents all those who died that day. There were nearly 2500 US deaths that day but he is the one we see.

 

I think that is sort of what I meant when I said how deceptive it was to sit and watch the movie in the comfort of my living room. The faces do get lost in the photos and newsreel footage. And it is easy to just see it from afar and not really be so overwhelmed by the implication of what that "one guy" represents. 

 

To put it in a different perspective though.. here is the website page that shows pics of the "Bedford Boys' that  you mentioned from the town in Virginia. Faces and names of just a small group of men who died that day. (but not at all a small group.. especially to the town who loved them)  Very humbling.  

 

http://www.dday.org/history/why-bedford-the-bedford-boys

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The link I put up (or tired to) was more about the total casualties. It said the figures had been recently revised upward so I was linking the page to back that up.

 

Often on my trips to my extended family in northeast TN I have been tempted to go by the memorial  but shortage of time always seems to interrupt. One day....

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I must wonder if you would find interest in: Leningrad (2009). It is available in English on DVD.

 

It depicts civilians in their homes under barrages for more than sixteen months. The civilian losses in Leningrad was more than a million people when the entire population of Virginia was approx. two-and-one-half million people. 

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I don't know if I could handle such a film as that or not. It is hard for me to watch films of that nature from any era, but especially modern ones (because they lay so heavily on the graphic side and I just can't tolerate it) I have seen Saving Private Ryan and Schindler's List.. and I get so emotionally involved in my movies.. both of those films nearly made me catatonic by the end of them. :)

 

But  having said that, I do know that the siege on Leningrad was horrific. I have seen programs on tv (the History channel and pbs) and have read a little (I confess, very little) over the years that have talked about the siege and shown pictures of some of the people and the various locations involved.

 

I am sure there are no words to describe how terrifying it must have been to be there, day in and day out, going through all that as a way of life. How does an individual, let alone a family, or an entire city the size of Leningrad recover from such an awful experience. Again, it boggles the mind.  

 

And again I will just say, it can be easy to lose perspective on the high costs of the war from the cozy couch I sit on when I watch TV. The numbers you mention (with regard to civilian casualty) are utterly staggering. "Tragic" doesn't even begin to describe it, I am sure. 

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Hiya, Quiet Gal -- Now I have to tell you that I am not a huge "war movie" person.. but there are some that I have truly been impressed by and there are some films that I think are very excellent depictions of war, and the struggles men (and women) have gone through in battle on behalf of their country and all they hold dear. This film would be among the best, in my opinion. It is filled with little "stories" of the events of D-day (rather than one long running plot line) and it is a great way to depict all the various events that went on throughout that entire day, as the allied forces arrived and began to move in from the beach at Normandy.

 

I completely agree.  I'm like you, I'm not huge on war films but The Longest Day is one that I do like quite a bit.  I was fascinated by the showing the German side of the invasion, presented in the German language.  Remarkable.  And how the entire Normandy invasion is shown is stunning.

 

And you know.. seeing it on tv.. in the comfort of our living rooms can really be a bit deceptive. We get so used to those sorts of dramatic moments (both big and small) all shown on tv and in the movies as if it were just so much "entertainment" and we often get desensitized to what it must have REALLY been like for those men. It is easy to just pass it off as just another moment in the story.

 

And I completely agree with that as well.  This is why I go crazy over people always wanting to push countries into war.  It's so easy to do so when you are not the one sacrificing your life.

 

But stop for a minute to think of it. Imagine what it must have been like to be so responsible and carry such a heavy weight as the lives of so many men of lower rank.. and to know that you must move them forward. You must push them ahead, in the face of heavy fire.. you must conquer your own fears AND theirs too, and you must make them go where any reasonable human would NEVER choose to go. It is YOUR job to lead them to the goal ahead. You must make those command decisions. You MUST.

 

I don't know how anyone could do it, really.  Any person who took part in wars, on any side, is remarkable to me.

 

And you know, there were several characters in this film who were shown to have done just that.. over and over again. Many were actual historical people being portrayed by some very famous actors of the day. (including Lt. Col. Benjamin Vandervoort, Commander 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Reg, portrayed by my personal favorite, John Wayne) But the character that really stood out for me in this film was Robert Mitchum's portrayal of Brigadier General Norman Cota, Asst. Commander 29th Infantry Div. He was really something.

 

Yes, I agree.  I really enjoy Mitchum in The Longest Day.  I also loved seeing Robert Ryan and John Wayne.  I also enjoyed Curd Jurgens.

 

Wow.. what a moment in the story. But even more, what a moment. Because really.. this happened time and again, all throughout that day, as our brave men on that beach fought.. hunkered down.. regrouped... and moved forward. Very humbling to think of it all.. as I sit here in the comfort of my living room couch. Very humbling indeed.

 

Very nicely said.

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I don't know if I could handle such a film as that or not. It is hard for me to watch films of that nature from any era, but especially modern ones (because they lay so heavily on the graphic side and I just can't tolerate it) 

 

 

This movie does not use gore heavily. There are a few scenes which are very graphic and disturbing. They are as exclamation points in the movie. What I feel is the most graphic occurs when you are identifying closely with the character and become so emotionally drained that you feel that things could not possibly become worse and then the character sees a thing so infandous that it shakes your belief that there is a limit of how horrible the world can be. It is made worse a moment later when you realize that the depiction is accurate of the situation at that place and time. It is as if the cold blade which has skewered both your heart and your brain becomes fiery as it twists. 

 

It is a stupendous movie on many levels but it is definitely not for casual viewing.

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Hello, Grey Dude, 

 

I was fascinated by the showing the German side of the invasion, presented in the German language.  Remarkable.  And how the entire Normandy invasion is shown is stunning.

 

I always like that better. (ha.. it cracks me up to hear fake "Germans" speaking English with a fake German accent. (or fake Russians speaking w/ a Russian accent.. or whatever) You would expect them to speak German and a few subtitles aren't a bad thing to keep it more "real" At least not in a story like this one.

 

Because I think "real" is what makes this film work so well for me. I am glad it wasn't so graphic (as say, Saving Private Ryan) but I like that it seemed like a natural re-telling of what happened. (more or less) throughout the day.  It comes off a lot more like some of the documentaries we see on programs like the History Channel or National Geographic channel offer sometimes. And I think that is what makes it work so well for being able to tell the whole action, from a "timeline" point of view. You see little vignettes of the different events that went on rather than getting too bogged down in the dramatic telling of such a huge story. It makes everything seem so much more "real" and less like a "show".  

 

And yet there are some fine dramatic moments too. (I like how Wayne's character reacts when they finally reach the village and see the dead paratroopers still hanging up by their parachutes and he tells the men to cut them down. You get a few good moments like that.. but again, it is not so much plot driven as it is just a single "moment" in the whole entire event.

 

I really enjoy Mitchum in The Longest Day.  I also loved seeing Robert Ryan and John Wayne.  I also enjoyed Curd Jurgens.

 

I like how no one guy is really the "star" of the whole story. There are lots of nice little "cameos" all throughout. I even like Richard Burton there at the end too. (and ha.. I am no sort of Burton fan at all.) I just thought he wrapped it all up quite nicely, though, there near the end.  

 

SansFin says: 

What I feel is the most graphic occurs when you are identifying closely with the character and become so emotionally drained that you feel that things could not possibly become worse and then the character sees a thing so infandous that it shakes your belief that there is a limit of how horrible the world can be. It is made worse a moment later when you realize that the depiction is accurate of the situation at that place and time. It is as if the cold blade which has skewered both your heart and your brain becomes fiery as it twists.

 

I am glad to hear they do not lay too heavily on the graphic side. I think sometimes less is more with that sort of "stuff" if you have good actors who can display the emotion without having to SHOW all the gory details in an "in your face" style like so many do these days.  But you are speaking my language now, when you say that it skewers your heart and brain, because that is sort of what I meant when I said I take my movies too personally for stories like that. :) I like to care about my characters and their situations.. and it sounds as if it all would be so overwhelming (with so much tragedy lasting so long.. and for so many people, that I would indeed be catatonic after such a grueling display. (with our without the blood and goo making it worse) 

 

I don't know if I will ever check it out or not. I have been able to relent, from time to time, and see a few other stories that I knew were going to be hard on me that way. But I thank  you for the sound advice and preparation,so that if I ever do watch it.. I will be well aware in advance, so as to be prepared for the shock to my system. :)

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I don't know if I will ever check it out or not. I have been able to relent, from time to time, and see a few other stories that I knew were going to be hard on me that way. But I thank  you for the sound advice and preparation,so that if I ever do watch it.. I will be well aware in advance, so as to be prepared for the shock to my system. :)

 

I am sorry to have to say after consideration of all which you have said that it may be best if you pass this movie. I feel that you might find it so emotionally devastating that it would be at the limit of acceptable viewing if you could find a version in which the graphic scenes had been cut. I fear that having the graphic scenes intact would likely be far more than you could find tolerable.

 

I will warn that what follows is a spoiler and perhaps more graphic than you wish to read. I will not be offended if you chose to not read it:

 

The scene which I described previously as being the most graphic deals with a law imposed by army command at the time. The law stated that no person could kill a horse for meat because horses were needed for defense of the city. Violation of the law meant immediate execution. The character is at a low point and feeling as if the situation in the city could not become more horrid and then she sees people cutting flesh from a living horse. This was truly done by starving people who wished to avoid execution. 

 

I ask that if any person thinks to reply to this post that they do not quote that paragraph because some may find the thought of such a thing to be disturbing.

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what follows is a spoiler and perhaps more graphic than you wish to read

 

Wowsa, that was pretty harsh. I can't even begin to imagine. To see it in a movie would be one thing, but to know that it went on for real would be overwhelming I am sure.

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Just want to return back to subject of The Longest Day one more time before moving on.. in observance of the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. Just wanted to bring back up some of the thoughts I shared on Memorial Day Weekend,  about how moved I was just thinking about the heavy weight of leadership that must have rested on the commanders who were on the beaches at Normandy on D-Day.  

 

Here is a little film clip to show you just part of the reason why I felt so moved. Now I know this is just a  movie and am sure there is NO way to truly recreate the actual event on film.. but I think this movie does an excellent job.

 

Just imagine the command decisions that had to be made that day.. man after man, moment after moment. Knowing full well that many of the men under your command would not even live long enough to carry out your orders. And you must give those orders anyway.. hoping there would just be enough OTHER men to come along behind them and pick up where the fallen men left off.. and follow through. Watching this clip you will see what I mean.. as one man falls.. another rushes in to take his place.. and then another, and another.. until the job was done. God bless those who are still living.. and may he bless the memories of those who are with us no more, many who were killed that day, fighting on our behalf. I am grateful for each and every one who served, for their sacrifice and their courage under fire.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpZkFV1yGpE

 

Thanks everyone for letting me share all this with you here. 

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Hi Ramblers!

 

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Lupino. How do you want her? She can be soft or hard; gentle or volcanic. She can break your heart...or tear it out. TCM will make it Ida Lupino day today with eight films featuring her acting and directing. You can have her any way you want her. Or you can take what Ida gives you. Whichever way...Ida, I idolize ya.

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I’ve seen a few Ida movies but none, except one, that my memory will claim…and that one is High Sierra, which was discussed on of the R threads here. I had minority reaction to the film, i.e., did not grab me that much, but learned to like it more during the discussion. One help I did not need was appreciating Ida. The day after viewing the film she just popped into my head and I thought how good she was and what a  nice way she put her character across, so genuine and in a movie type that sees so many “bad” girls.  High Sierra is probably not noir, more appropriately gangster, yet maybe with a tinge of pre-noir at least, dunno. I don’t think (Bogie) appreciated her as much as I wanted him too. But he hung in there with her. She was a girl to be trusted in a genre where they just don't exist much, ha. She’s no goody-goody though, Ida gives her a fundamental decency despite her background of having been around the block a few times and consorting with a bad crowd ... and makes her totally believable. So how do I want her? I'll take her like that :-) Her character’s only mistake, alas, was not having a leash on the d a m n dog. Chienne Fatale, if you will. If it weren’t for that we might still be in the theater’s waiting for the guy to be caught.

 

Unfortunately, I won’t being seeing any of the films as I have temporarily dropped cable television, at least until September when football season begins. I do have NF and may have a look there. Yeah, I like Ida too.

 

So happy you posted, CineMaven, great to see you.

:)

 

Is that Ida in High Sierra? ... upper left-hand corner of your very fine collage. Looks like her.

 

EDIT: I've just ordered Moontide and On Dangerous Ground from NetF. If all goes well, they should be in my eager hands by Saturday. I'm excited, I think I'm in an Ida mood. I vaguely remember this one with Jean Gabin, interesting pairing. And Ryan is always interesting, usually in a rather dubious and dangerous way, I hope Ida is up to it.

 

==

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Lafitte,

You've never seen ON DANGEROUS GROUND, m. pirate???  Quelle catastrophe!  It's my favorite noir along with Laura.  Wonderful, wonderful movie---with exceptional emotional power---and I look forward to your thoughts on it.  "Mary" is also my favorite Ida performance.

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Lafitte,

You've never seen ON DANGEROUS GROUND, m. pirate???  Quelle catastrophe!  It's my favorite noir along with Laura.  Wonderful, wonderful movie---with exceptional emotional power---and I look forward to your thoughts on it.  "Mary" is also my favorite Ida performance.

 

Splendid! Thanks for that, MissG, I'm really looking forward to it now..

Egad, no movement on the queue this morning. There will be a delay.

I would entertain a further recommendation if you MissG, or someone else,

has another compelling Ida opus for me. I may end up doing my own

personal Ida Lupino Film Festival here. I've done this before. I love

being obsessed.

:)

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I am sorry to distract from discussion of interesting movies but I believe that all should be warned to take special care today.

 

It is Friday the Thirteenth!

 

It is Full Moon also!

 

I prefer to believe that I am not superstitious. I hope that I am at most normalstitious. I will despite this be wary on this day and I hope that the coincidence of date and lunacy will have no adverse affect on any here.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lafitte,

You've never seen ON DANGEROUS GROUND, m. pirate???  Quelle catastrophe!  It's my favorite noir along with Laura.  Wonderful, wonderful movie---with exceptional emotional power---and I look forward to your thoughts on it.  "Mary" is also my favorite Ida performance.

 

I fancy that Robert Ryan may have very well licked his chops when he saw this script. Inner turmoil, outward tendency for violence, and a sometime crazed facial expression suggesting a sort of madness, a recipe for RR vehicles. Despite that, I don’t think he had much of a tendency for chewing scenery but I still suspect the influence of brilliant Nicholas Ray may have helped tame the beast a little anyway because Ryan gives a wonderfully measured and modulated performance, coming across multidimensional, a man who undergoes transformation by film’s end. Interesting, the first 25 minutes is devoted to establishing Jim Wilson’s (Ryan) character. No sign of Ida. When he is sent off to a new locale for a cooling off, he meets her. I love the way she is introduced. She opens her door and the we see only the back of her head and her voice. Nowadays we know so much about the movies before we watch them but this of course wasn’t so back then. The fact that she is blind is not readily apparent and the movie tries to keep that from us at first, affording gradual clues. The camera follows her through the house as she seamlessly and effortlessly feels her way through. We haven’t even seen her face yet. Mary (Ida) is a sweet and gentle soul, almost angelic, with an extraordinary capacity for compassion. She feels sorry for Walter Brent (played by Ward Bond) despite the fact that he is out to get Mary’s brother. Lots of fine close-ups of Ida, that round, pretty face that at times curiously reminded me, albeit fleetingly, of Lillian Gish, along with the sweetness and vulnerability. What influence will sweet Mary Malden have on troubled Jim Wilson? Loneliness is a big theme, they experience it each in their own way. The rapprochement is slow but sure and carries with it, yes MissG, the “emotional power” of which you speak, two very unlike people seemingly, played by two wonderful actors.  The dreaded notion of who of the two is more blind than the other is wince worthy, so hackneyed it is whenever someone Is blind in a movie, is not overdone at all IMO, although there is a touch of it here and there. Jim does become affected by the gentleness of Mary and this comes through gradually, at first, in that interesting scene where he exhibits a bond and a compassion for Walter Brent, a man who has butting heads up to now. I'm no expert on RR but the notion of compassion and his usual onscreen persona would not seem to me to go together, ha. The softness around the edges becomes more and more noticeable. Ida Lupino is memorable as this beautiful, blind, woman who has no business being the goodness she is, given her lot in life, but pulls it off wonderfully in an endearing performance.

 

Wonderful character acting. Ed Begley, so often the ignorant, boorish one, is seen here in a better light, the strong police chief who has a couple of scenes admonishing Jim about beating up his informants. He also has a penchant for vegetables that I found amusing. “More peas,” he says to the waiter, while expounding on the wondrous way this restaurant prepares veggies. More Peas? Funny and unusual line, especially coming from Ed. But hooray, veggies get a plug. Nita Talbot plays a slutty barfly in a brief scene, not a bad gig for a bare minute or two. An actress named Cleo Moore plays a moll and had a little bit more to do and did it quite well I thought. Typical tough talk, out of the side of the mouth (dangling cigarette) sort of thing, pretty convincing. She has information that Jim wants and she gives it to him. She has more to give him it seems, whether Jim takes her up on it or not is not certain, I think not given Jim’s character, I don’t see him opportunistic in that way, too messed up inside, but other explanations may be plausible (but he gets the info). Walter Brent (Ward Bond) is a rifle-wielding. out-of-control, mad dog with a vigilante temperament, bent on revenge, and ironically makes Jim Wilson look like a Sunday School teacher by comparison. Ryan being out-Ryaned, so to speak, in the volatile department.

 

And so now, MissG, le pirate has seen it, fait accompli. And all the better for it. Thanks.

 

:)

 

Next: They Drive by Night

 

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Bonjour, M. le Pirate!

 

I fancy that Robert Ryan may have very well licked his chops when he saw this script.

 

it's one of the best of his career because it gives him the chance to do what he's always done well (go into a berzerk rage) and slow down to show he can feel and think.  in other words, his character is shown a mirror (Ward Bond) to look at himself as he is, and by a blind woman no less.

 

When he is sent off to a new locale for a cooling off, he meets her.

 

ha!  i love that!  he is sent to a ice-covered landscape to literally "cool off".  i never thought of it that way.  brilliant.

 

Jim does become affected by the gentleness of Mary and this comes through gradually, at first, in that interesting scene where he exhibits a bond and a compassion for Walter Brent, a man who has butting heads up to now. I'm no expert on RR but the notion of compassion and his usual onscreen persona would not seem to me to go together, ha.

 

it's true!  this is the movie that made me shed my fear of Ryan...till then i had only this image of how mean he was (he has small mean little eyes that don't suggest softer emotions readily).  now i think he's just brilliant, of course.

 

I think it really brought Jim Wilson up short to see unbridled rage in another person (Bond) and it forced him into the position his partners back in the city often found themselves in---that of trying to urge calm and reason in pursuit of a suspect.  Both Brent and Wilson were set off by the idea of pursuing "justice" but in fact each had given in to irrational desire to become executioners. 

 

Wonderful character acting. Ed Begley, so often the ignorant, boorish one, is seen here in a better light, the strong police chief who has a couple of scenes admonishing Jim about beating up his informants. He also has a penchant for vegetables that I found amusing. “More peas,” he says to the waiter, while expounding on the wondrous way this restaurant prepares veggies. More Peas? Funny and unusual line, especially coming from Ed. But hooray, veggies get a plug.

 

ha, i forgot about the peas.  the movie's little human touches like that really elevate it.  i liked seeing the cops at home and how we begin with the ones who have families, wives, homes...and end up on Wilson, who has only a dingy room and dusty trophies.

 

Nita Talbot plays a slutty barfly in a brief scene, not a bad gig for a bare minute or two.

 

She had such memorable eyes and voice.  She makes the most of that moment!  The author of the screenplay, A.I. Bezzerides, plays the sleazy guy with the glasses in the bar that Jim briefly speaks to.

 

 

An actress named Cleo Moore plays a moll and had a little bit more to do and did it quite well I thought. Typical tough talk, out of the side of the mouth (dangling cigarette) sort of thing, pretty convincing. She has information that Jim wants and she gives it to him. She has more to give him it seems, whether Jim takes her up on it or not is not certain, I think not given Jim’s character, I don’t see him opportunistic in that way, too messed up inside, but other explanations may be plausible (but he gets the info).

 

Cleo went on to star in a few B-noirs that I rather enjoyed, they are on DVD.  Always the same general character, she was like the American Diana Dors (who was the British Marilyn Monroe).  :P

 

Walter Brent (Ward Bond) is a rifle-wielding. out-of-control, mad dog with a vigilante temperament, bent on revenge, and ironically makes Jim Wilson look like a Sunday School teacher by comparison. Ryan being out-Ryaned, so to speak, in the volatile department.


 

And that's what forces Wilson to take a hard look at himself.  I think Bond is outstanding.  I actually do feel sorry for him at some point, especially when I see how obviously insular and rough he and his family are.  They seem like the world has completely left them behind and Brent has come to resent and withdraw from it in return.  But, like Wilson, he finds his humanity again by the end.

 

And so now, MissG, le pirate has seen it, fait accompli. And all the better for it. Thanks.

 

Avec plaisir, monsieur.

 

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ha!  i love that!  he is sent to a ice-covered landscape to literally "cool off".  i never thought of it that way.  brilliant.

 

Ha, no brilliancy for laffite, I didn’t even think of that. I was thinking ‘cooling off’ in the usual way. But that does make for symbolism, doesn’t it.

 

Cleo went on to star in a few B-noirs that I rather enjoyed, they are on DVD.  Always the same general character, she was like the American Diana Dors (who was the British Marilyn Monroe).  :P

 

She might have done better. ‘Course one could say that about many an actor.

 

it's one of the best of his career because it gives him the chance to do what he's always done well (go into a berzerk rage) and slow down to show he can feel and think.  in other words, his character is shown a mirror (Ward Bond) to look at himself as he is, and by a blind woman no less.

 

Yes, she is key. The interactions between them serve to show him something different. There’s a poignancy in his conviction that he cannot trust anyone and to hear her say, “I have to trust everybody.” How can that not make an impression, after all, he can plainly see what she means. Still, though he can see, a new perspective can arise out becoming aware of her plight. And the way she asks to touch his hand, the way she walks up to him to touch his face, things that blind people do. I alluded to this before, when she seems to exhibit compassion for Walter when he is not out to act in her best interest. In a following scene Jim is standing at the mantle and suddenly turns looks at Walter who is sitting in the chair shivering from cold. Walter walks over and puts the shawl around his shoulder and give him a drink. It’s almost as if Ryan has to break character to do that, but no, that’s Jim all right. It’s just that Mary is rubbing off on him.

 

Yet it’s one thing to be influenced by someone, another thing in fall in love with that person. I love the scene where Jim and Mary are standing out in the snow and she wants to go into the house where Danny’s body is. He guides her but she breaks free, either out of general upsetness or perhaps a little miffed, and then starts by herself towards the house. She looks as if she going to run into a pole and he runs to save her from that but she puts her hands out in front of her just in time. Then she looks like she is going to run into the side of the house, again he has to catch up and this time gently guides her in the proper direction. She allows it. Now he’s doing what any decent person would do in the presence of a blind person, but the way that he does all this (it seems to me), at least the way it plays for me, is this caring determination to protect her and take care of her, especially within the context of the story, made me to believe that he loves her at that point. Oh sappy laffite, but I please myself to think this, though he might not have quite known it himself right then. Full realization probably didn't come until later when he decides to come back, but of course we know it happened somewhere in there.

 

I think it really brought Jim Wilson up short to see unbridled rage in another person (Bond) and it forced him into the position his partners back in the city often found themselves in---that of trying to urge calm and reason in pursuit of a suspect.  Both Brent and Wilson were set off by the idea of pursuing "justice" but in fact each had given in to irrational desire to become executioners.

 

Yes, I think so…but I do believe that at some point, Wilson became sincere when he promised Mary that he would protect Danny if he could. He throws the gun down the hill and luckily Walter evidently feels it’s too much trouble to fetch it. Then they start their pursuit of Danny.

 

ha, i forgot about the peas.  the movie's little human touches like that really elevate it.  i liked seeing the cops at home and how we begin with the ones who have families, wives, homes...and end up on Wilson, who has only a dingy room and dusty trophies.

 

That’s a nice observation.

 

MissG, have you seen They Drive By Night.

 

==

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Yet it’s one thing to be influenced by someone, another thing in fall in love with that person. I love the scene where Jim and Mary are standing out in the snow and she wants to go into the house where Danny’s body is. He guides her but she breaks free, either out of general upsetness or perhaps a little miffed, and then starts by herself towards the house. She looks as if she going to run into a pole and he runs to save her from that but she puts her hands out in front of her just in time. Then she looks like she is going to run into the side of the house, again he has to catch up and this time gently guides her in the proper direction. She allows it. Now he’s doing what any decent person would do in the presence of a blind person, but the way that he does all this (it seems to me), at least the way it plays for me, is this caring determination to protect her and take care of her, especially within the context of the story, made me to believe that he loves her at that point. Oh sappy laffite, but I please myself to think this, though he might not have quite known it himself right then. Full realization probably didn't come until later when he decides to come back, but of course we know it happened somewhere in there.

 

Both of them were "grappling to find their way in the dark" if i may be allowed a little sentimentalizing, and that scene nicely brought them if not completely together, it got them closer and into the place in each others lives they would soon assume.

 

MissG, have you seen They Drive By Night.

 

Mais oui, a few times.  Entertaining movie, I especially like the diner scenes when all the guys stop in for their break and watching Ann Sheridan handle them so confidently.  I can't say I'm crazy about Ida's histrionics in this one, she's a bit much with the garage doors, etc., but I guess without her the movie would be pretty dull.  Odd to see Bogie second banana to Raft.  How quickly things change...

 

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MissG, have you seen They Drive By Night.

 

Mais oui, a few times.  Entertaining movie, I especially like the diner scenes when all the guys stop in for their break and watching Ann Sheridan handle them so confidently.  I can't say I'm crazy about Ida's histrionics in this one, she's a bit much with the garage doors, etc., but I guess without her the movie would be pretty dull.  Odd to see Bogie second banana to Raft.  How quickly things change...

 

 

 

Absolutely right on all counts, Miss G, although I did like the idea behind the garage door thing, giving her something to go insane about (aside, of course, from sheer guilt). And yes, over the top with all breakdown, although she was probably encouraged to play to the hilt. Not all the gags were successful with me. there were too many although some were good. All in all, not to be taken too seriously. Amazing all those years of apprenticeship for Bogart before he finally he became supreme in every film he made, beginning with High Sierra, which came shortly after this one. One would have thought that the essential appeal of Bogart would have been seen and put out there years before. Of course it's easy to say than in retrospect.

 

You allude to Ann Sheridan. In the beginning she reacts to one of the guys who says, "I know what I want but it's not on the menu." Ann comes back with a smart retort. The exact same joke happened at the beginning of I Wake Up Screaming, this time with Carole Landis who dutifully comes up with the snappy return zinger. I know nothing of this actress but I thought she did pretty well. Have you seen this one? A pretty good who-dunnit type story. Perceptive viewers will probably get this one, but since I am not, I of course missed it :-( . Not having seen Landis is one thing but what's my excuse for not having much (if anything) of Betty Grable? Sometimes we take the big stars for granted, not good, I was quite bowled over with her. She was not given Academy Award stuff to do but I though she was excellent nonetheless, something more than just a pretty face (and pretty it is, wow). Of course the swimming pool scene to show off her gams. Victor Mature is one of my absolute favorite actors. Women in the audience might think he has stuff to show off as well in that scene. Alan Mowbray was the only really familiar face of the supporting cast, I have seen him around. Allan Joslyn, the newspaper man, was fairly familiar. I don't have the name of the actor who played Cornell, but he was quite good, he seemed the type that could have really had a career, maybe he did for all I know. I was pretty much engaged with this throughout. Oh yeah, can't forget good old Elisha Cook, Jr.

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