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Thanks so much, Scottie.  Mom and I are hanging in there.

 

THIS IS THE NIGHT -- Thelma Todd cheating on Cary Grant with Roland Young and Charlie Ruggles??  Sounds like a science fiction film, lol.

 

I don't remember LITTLE GIANT too well and should revisit it, but for me the most unique A&C teaming is THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES.  Bud and Lou both play double roles in different centuries.  Marjorie Reynolds is charming as "Mistress Melody" and there are a lot of picturesque moments but then, I'm a sucker for Early American history and ghost stories.

 

HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL reminds me of another Ida Lupino movie, but not as a director -- THE HARD WAY, where Ida plays a frustrated housewife who tries to realize her ambitions through a younger sister.  Same "stage mother" plot in both, but I find HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL pretty trite  I've never seen Claire Trevor give a bad performance but here she's none too subtle and, if I remember correctly, actually arches her eyebrows before every new ruthless machination.

 

I haven't seen the 1935 SHE, but its Hammer remake is very dull.  Christopher Lee is relegated to a rather muted supporting role.  Peter Cushing just seems to be going through the motions.  Ursula Andress is appropriately icy and seductive, but can't act.

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HELLO Mr. Grey... 

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

No, it's true.  Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) in Shadow of a Doubt is basically a vampire.  The opening tips us off with that.  Not in the strictest of sense, mind you.  He does cavort in the daytime.  But he's certainly a bloodsucker (widows).  Jack Graham (Macdonald Carey) basically plays "Van Helsing".  Here's the "plague" coming to town.  Notice the shot differences:

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

How are you related

 

Ha. HOW indeed!! I used to ask myself that question ALL the time (when I was a teenager) :D 

 

More films I have watched

 

I have seen at least a few from your newest batch: 

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly) 

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

Superman II (1980) - I've seen most of this film before but never from start to finish.  Terence Stamp is clearly the attraction here.  He's a strong super villain, showing the perfect narcissism that is needed.  Also loved Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran as Zod's (Stamp) comrades.  The film is much more romantic than your typical superhero pic.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.   :D 

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HELLO Mr. Grey... 

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

No, it's true.  Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) in Shadow of a Doubt is basically a vampire.  The opening tips us off with that.  Not in the strictest of sense, mind you.  He does cavort in the daytime.  But he's certainly a bloodsucker (widows).  Jack Graham (Macdonald Carey) basically plays "Van Helsing".  Here's the "plague" coming to town.  Notice the shot differences:

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

How are you related

 

Ha. HOW indeed!! I used to ask myself that question ALL the time (when I was a teenager) :D 

 

More films I have watched

 

I have seen at least a few from your newest batch: 

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly) 

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

Superman II (1980) - I've seen most of this film before but never from start to finish.  Terence Stamp is clearly the attraction here.  He's a strong super villain, showing the perfect narcissism that is needed.  Also loved Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran as Zod's (Stamp) comrades.  The film is much more romantic than your typical superhero pic.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.   :D 

I was working at a local TV station in L.A. in the mid 70's and directing a interview show called "The Movie makers". Well, Our guest on one show was Irwin Allen. After the interview I went into the studio and the host introduced me to Irwin Allen. He told Allen that I had worked as film consultant on the just released Warner Bros. 50th anniversary albums. Mr. Allen looked at me and said "I though they could have been better".  Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away....

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The Secret of NIMH (1982) - Quite a strange animated film that proved to be darker than I expected.  I'm still not sure what it was really all about.  But the feel of the film worked for me.  Loved hearing John Carradine as "The Great Owl".  Always love Dom DeLuise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like this movie very much. I feel it is excellent animation and a good story. I feel there is not an allegory or moral which it is "all about". The story has several plotlines weaving in and out. I find it sad that it is often mistaken for a children's movie.

 

 

 

 

 

I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

 

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.

 

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I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.

 

 

I am sad to say that it has been a long time since I have watched it and so might not remember some short specific scenes but I do not believe there are scenes such as you describe. The story is not set within NIMH. There is a flashback scene concerning the rats escaping and it might show other animals in cages but I believe the focus is on the rats.

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Hi, TikiSoo --  I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.

 

As SansFin points out, the film really doesn't focus on the harming of the animals.  There is a scene with a lab but it doesn't reveal much.  The story is about a mother looking to cure her sick child and then her need to move her family away from the impending disturbance in the field where they live.  Hers is a journey for help.

 

Your post did lead me to a possible thought with the film's "message", if there is one.  The laboratory rats end up gaining more human qualities through the experiments and this brings about both positive and negative results.

 

Hey, Fred -- I was working at a local TV station in L.A. in the mid 70's and directing a interview show called "The Movie makers". Well, Our guest on one show was Irwin Allen. After the interview I went into the studio and the host introduced me to Irwin Allen. He told Allen that I had worked as film consultant on the just released Warner Bros. 50th anniversary albums. Mr. Allen looked at me and said "I though they could have been better".  Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away....

 

Hilarious!  You're a bad boy!

 

Howdy, SansFin -- I like this as a good example of 1960s romantic comedy. I find it a nice break from: Doris Day and Rock Hudson movies.

 

You're definitely right about that.  Similar formula, different ingredients.  Not as tasty but still with taste.

 

I like this movie very much. I feel it is excellent animation and a good story. I feel there is not an allegory or moral which it is "all about". The story has several plotlines weaving in and out. I find it sad that it is often mistaken for a children's movie. I doubt that most young children could follow the events well. It is on my list of movies for which I wish to find a good DVD at reasonable cost.

 

I believe you hit on it: it's not really a story aimed at children.  This is a mother's story.  You may also be correct about it simply being a mother's tale without any other grandiose message.

 

Hola, Lafitte -- I purposely and cowardly avoided the word "erotic" in my mention of The Barbarian, maybe because it might inspire others to think that it was a baser nature of mine that drew me to the film or that it may have been somehow intrusive to emphasize it. I'm glad you mentioned it because when I first saw it I had thoughts of Wertmuller's Swept Away, although TB pales in comparison. In the latter we get a small taste of that kind of thing whereas SA quite wallowed in it. I count SA as one of the most erotic films ever.

 

Pervert! :D No, I'm not going to look in the mirror!

 

I liked your list and for a change there a few I've seen. Seen but not remembered I saw them way back when they first came out (50s and 60s). But I'm glad you mentioned The Act of Love, a movie I remember thoroughly  enjoying. A revisit is in order. I had forgotten it even existed. The most vivid memory that arises is the spectacle of Dick Van Dyke running in slow motion. I think he was drunk, yes? Hilarious. The movie was consistently funny as I do recall.

 

Yes, the final sequence has Dick Van Dyke running the streets in an effort to prevent an event involving James Garner.  Classic Dick Van Dyke.  It's his brand of physical comedy at the very best.  It was a joy to see.

 

Bonjour, Bronxilla -- Thanks so much, Scottie.  Mom and I are hanging in there.

 

That warms my heart. :)

 

THIS IS THE NIGHT -- Thelma Todd cheating on Cary Grant with Roland Young and Charlie Ruggles??  Sounds like a science fiction film, lol.

 

Hahahaha!  That was hilarious!  And true!

 

I don't remember LITTLE GIANT too well and should revisit it, but for me the most unique A&C teaming is THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES.  Bud and Lou both play double roles in different centuries.  Marjorie Reynolds is charming as "Mistress Melody" and there are a lot of picturesque moments but then, I'm a sucker for Early American history and ghost stories.

 

That sounds excellent.  I will be watching it in the very near future.  I have ten A&C pics to watch.

 

HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL reminds me of another Ida Lupino movie, but not as a director -- THE HARD WAY, where Ida plays a frustrated housewife who tries to realize her ambitions through a younger sister.  Same "stage mother" plot in both, but I find HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL pretty trite  I've never seen Claire Trevor give a bad performance but here she's none too subtle and, if I remember correctly, actually arches her eyebrows before every new ruthless machination.

 

Ha!  You remember correctly, she does raise the eyebrow more than once!  Poor Claire.  The rest of the cast was so darn bland and cardboard.  I'm gonna check out The Hard Way.

 

I haven't seen the 1935 SHE, but its Hammer remake is very dull.  Christopher Lee is relegated to a rather muted supporting role.  Peter Cushing just seems to be going through the motions.  Ursula Andress is appropriately icy and seductive, but can't act.

 

You haven't seen the 1935 She?  Now that shocks me, actually.  You must watch that one.  Helen Gahagan plays the icy "She" and it's her only film appearance.  She's quite an attraction.  She brings just the right amount of ice and eccentricity to the role that makes the film.  Also, the film has a better journey to reach the hidden kingdom.  Randolph Scott and Nigel Bruce are the key travelers.

 

Good evening, Quiet Gal -- hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

I qualify as a pitiful fool!  I love it when a plan comes together.

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

It's certainly not my own theoretical creation.  Others brought it to my attention and I saw what they were speaking of.

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly)

 

Ronald Colman and Vincent Price are wonderful, but all the stories of mankind just didn't add much excitement or story.

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

It's a tough one, all right.

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

You speak of Hedy Lamarr? :P 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

Tony is wonderful.  And it's hard to top Paul Douglas.

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Ha!  Well, she's correct, it's definitely 80s cheese.  But kudos to her for finding the story at least interesting.  And you're right, it's certainly a "popcorn" pic.

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

Talk about a weird film to quote from!  I agree, the characters are really hard to root for.  And I've never found a film where I didn't love Thelma Ritter!  She doesn't play a likable mother in this one.  She's Burt's mom.  Burt is coarse.  But that at least leads to the great scene between him and the prison guard who is doing him favors.  The guard tells him he won't do things for him anymore because he never thanks him.

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

For some reason, I didn't laugh a lot in this one.  I found Bob funnier in other films.  But Jane Russell was so good.  She was both funny and attractive as "Calamity Jane".  It just may be by favorite performance of hers.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

I do love Gene Hackman, but I wasn't as keen on his "Lex Luthor" compared to "Zod".  But I can't fault anyone choosing Gene's "Lex".  He's a likable weasel.  And I do prefer the second film to the first, but it's not by a lot.  I'll be watching the third and fourth films, too.  I'll brace for disaster!

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.

 

Kurt is doing a parody of the "Duke", I feel.  Kind of a cocksure John Wayne in a mystical Asian underground.  Definitely a "fish out of water" scenario.

 

Ciao, Snippy -- Hello strangers! Count me as a fan of The Barbarian. I think it's Myrna's most erotic film. It seems inspired from the thrilling silents made by Rudolph Valentino. Capra's Bitter Tea of General Yen and Garbo's Wild Orchids fall into this interesting romantic film type. A good film to watch --- It's even better in the dark. Don't let the "real" world intrude to really enjoy it.

 

I did watch the film.  Quite a strange film.  At one point it's female fantasy.  Then it turns to a twisted male fantasy.  Maybe that's how relationships work! Heck if I know!  The film seemed to find Myrna caught in the middle of her vamp and perfect wife worlds.  She's lovely, of course.

 

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HELLO there Mr. Grey, 

 

Look at YOU sporting a new avatar!! Sweet little Lamby.. it's about time you climbed down out of that tree. :)

 

I love it when a plan comes together.

 

HA!! You ARE an 80's guy!! This was one of those shows my dad watched. Fortunately by then, I was out of school and working so at least I wasn't home ALL the time when it used to be on. But I DID watch now and then. (she said to her own embarrassment) Oh the hours I only WISH I could get back. Oh, who am I kidding.. I do confess I enjoyed SOME of it. I loved Howling Mad Murdock.  He was a laugh riot.  :D 

 

You speak of Hedy Lamarr?

 

HA!! Not hardly. I speak of the Old Testament!! Not to mention all that destruction and mayhem. woo! Next to repentance (my favorite movie theme), I also DO enjoy a good movie about divine retribution!! (though somehow I suspect you already KNOW this about me) :D

 

And in the story of Samson (the original story) you get both! :D

 

Talk about a weird film to quote from!  I agree, the characters are really hard to root for.  And I've never found a film where I didn't love Thelma Ritter!  She doesn't play a likable mother in this one.  She's Burt's mom.  Burt is coarse.  But that at least leads to the great scene between him and the prison guard who is doing him favors.  The guard tells him he won't do things for him anymore because he never thanks him.

 

Ha.. leave it to the QT to quote one of the more obscure movie references. Isn't it funny how little moments like that will stick with you though? As for the characters.. yeah.. there are not too many that I remember really feeling much attachment to.  I don't remember Thelma (as being the actress) but I DO remember the mom. Ugh.. the whole movie is filled with one mess of human nature after another. (as I recall) 

 

I do love Gene Hackman, but I wasn't as keen on his "Lex Luthor" compared to "Zod".  But I can't fault anyone choosing Gene's "Lex".  He's a likable weasel.  And I do prefer the second film to the first, but it's not by a lot.  I'll be watching the third and fourth films, too.  I'll brace for disaster!

 

Yeah.. I can't comment on #4 because after #3 I just wrote it all off. ha. So good LUCK with all that. :D

 

Since you are on a "super hero" kick.. have you ever seen that Batman movie that I mentioned (when we were talking about Tim Burton?) It is pretty dark (compared to the Superman movies you are watching) but I really did like it a lot (WAY more than the Christopher Reeve Superman films) I absolutely would NOT recommend any of them AFTER the first one (the one with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson) I saw the second one (with the penguin and the catwoman) and I even saw #3 and #4 (because yeah.. by that point I had stepsons.. and I went because they really wanted to see them.. but agh.. those movies REALLY were not anywhere NEAR as good as the first one) But all that aside.. I really did like the FIRST one a lot (which means you'd probably hate it.. ha) 

 

I have not seen any of the Batman reboots (with the Christian Bale, etc)  so I can't comment on how they compare. I DID like the new Superman film that came out a few years ago. (Man of Steel) it has a much different take on General Zod (and his cohorts too) than the 80's movie. There is a bigger "back story" with Jor-El and Krypton (and its demise) than the 80's films. I don't know whether you'd like it or not. The 80's Zod is nothing like this newer one. But overall.. I liked the new film.  Though I do confess it got a bit tedious at times (with the ridiculously LONGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG fight scenes. Especially the one between Kal-el and Gen. Zod.)  OH my golly I just wanted them to END it already. ha.  But other than that.. I really did enjoy Man of Steel pretty well. 

 

I did not go see Batman V Superman (the one that came out last summer). So I can't comment on that one. I don't know why but it looked.. um.. stupid. (at least to me) :D

 

(but maybe I am being too harsh) :D

 

 

Kurt is doing a parody of the "Duke", I feel.  Kind of a cocksure John Wayne in a mystical Asian underground.  Definitely a "fish out of water" scenario

 

I could see your point of him doing a "parody". I don't remember TOO much about this movie (just because I haven't seen it in about a gazillion years, ha) But as I recall he was very OVER the top in being over confident and he made a lot of blunders while he was trying to fight the bad guys (but it all still turned out ok for him, due mostly to dumb luck) as I recall. Definitely (as you said) a fish out of water. :D

 

PS: Fred B. 

 

Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away.

 

HA!!  Maybe that was what inspired him to make all those disaster films he was so famous for! :D

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That sounds excellent.  I will be watching it in the very near future.  I have ten A&C pics to watch.

 

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES, even though I can't believe you've never seen it before!  Gale Sondergaard plays a mediumistic housekeeper (I won't spoil what Binnie Barnes says to her by way of introduction) who conducts a seance to contact "the ghosts of the well" and find out why their spirits are bound to Danbury Manor until "crack of doom". The seance scene has some genuinely spooky moments which are satisfyingly interwoven with the comedy elements, two years before the boys meet Frankenstein.

 

 

Ha!  You remember correctly, she does raise the eyebrow more than once!  Poor Claire.  The rest of the cast was so darn bland and cardboard.  I'm gonna check out The Hard Way.

 

THE HARD WAY requires some suspension of disbelief as we are supposed to believe that Joan Leslie's character suddenly blossoms into a great Broadway musical star.  Jack Carson is excellent in a sympathetic dramatic role, and Dennis Morgan is very believable as an ostensibly love 'em and leave 'em type who has Ida's number, and she doesn't like it, lol.  

 

Actually now that I think about it there is another Claire Trevor film where she's over the top but I can't remember the name of it.  It's a noir of sorts, with Lawrence Tierney as a stone-cold killer she falls for and tangles with.  Heavy handed all around as I remember.

 

 

 

You haven't seen the 1935 She?  Now that shocks me, actually.  You must watch that one.  Helen Gahagan plays the icy "She" and it's her only film appearance.  She's quite an attraction.  She brings just the right amount of ice and eccentricity to the role that makes the film.  Also, the film has a better journey to reach the hidden kingdom.  Randolph Scott and Nigel Bruce are the key travelers.

 

 

Just saw this on YouTube!  But it's the colorized version.  I must tell you that Helen Gahagan looks a bit like Fanny Brice, and old enough to be Randolph Scott's mother.  She doesn't conjure up timeless sexual allure the way Ursula does.  However Gahagan does have some acting chops, and world-weary soulful eyes that do convey a sense of that long, long wait.  But a goddess she ain't.  Helen Mack was my favorite character.  She's the very heart and soul of the story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hiya, Bronxie -- I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES, even though I can't believe you've never seen it before! 

 

I was actually a little disappointed.  I just didn't find the humor as good since Bud and Lou were separated so much.

 

Gale Sondergaard plays a mediumistic housekeeper (I won't spoil what Binnie Barnes says to her by way of introduction) who conducts a seance to contact "the ghosts of the well" and find out why their spirits are bound to Danbury Manor until "crack of doom". The seance scene has some genuinely spooky moments which are satisfyingly interwoven with the comedy elements, two years before the boys meet Frankenstein.

 

Ha!  I did love the "Mrs. Danvers" reference.  That was classic.  Lou did make me laugh during the seance.

 

THE HARD WAY requires some suspension of disbelief as we are supposed to believe that Joan Leslie's character suddenly blossoms into a great Broadway musical star.  Jack Carson is excellent in a sympathetic dramatic role, and Dennis Morgan is very believable as an ostensibly love 'em and leave 'em type who has Ida's number, and she doesn't like it, lol. 

 

"She doesn't like it" made me want to see it even more. :D

 

Actually now that I think about it there is another Claire Trevor film where she's over the top but I can't remember the name of it.  It's a noir of sorts, with Lawrence Tierney as a stone-cold killer she falls for and tangles with.  Heavy handed all around as I remember.

 

That's Born to Kill, which I really like.  It's directed by Robert Wise, surprisingly.

 

Just saw this on YouTube!  But it's the colorized version.  I must tell you that Helen Gahagan looks a bit like Fanny Brice, and old enough to be Randolph Scott's mother.

 

So she's literally 200 years old? :D

 

She doesn't conjure up timeless sexual allure the way Ursula does.

 

Not many do!  But I'm someone who is turned on by ice.  Yeah, I know I'm weird.

 

Howdy, Ma Stone -- Look at YOU sporting a new avatar!! Sweet little Lamby.. it's about time you climbed down out of that tree. :)

 

I needed a feminine touch. :D

 

HA!! You ARE an 80's guy!! This was one of those shows my dad watched. Fortunately by then, I was out of school and working so at least I wasn't home ALL the time when it used to be on. But I DID watch now and then. (she said to her own embarrassment) Oh the hours I only WISH I could get back. Oh, who am I kidding.. I do confess I enjoyed SOME of it. I loved Howling Mad Murdock.  He was a laugh riot.  :D 

 

I can't believe it's your dad who watched The A Team!  That's pretty remarkable, actually.  I can't say many from his generation would watch such a show.

 

And in the story of Samson (the original story) you get both! :D

 

Femmes fatale.  They are everywhere!

 

Yeah.. I can't comment on #4 because after #3 I just wrote it all off. ha. So good LUCK with all that. :D

 

Ha!  I'm guessing I'll just like it enough because I like Superman and Christopher Reeve as he.

 

Since you are on a "super hero" kick.. have you ever seen that Batman movie that I mentioned (when we were talking about Tim Burton?) It is pretty dark (compared to the Superman movies you are watching) but I really did like it a lot (WAY more than the Christopher Reeve Superman films) I absolutely would NOT recommend any of them AFTER the first one (the one with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson) I saw the second one (with the penguin and the catwoman) and I even saw #3 and #4 (because yeah.. by that point I had stepsons.. and I went because they really wanted to see them.. but agh.. those movies REALLY were not anywhere NEAR as good as the first one) But all that aside.. I really did like the FIRST one a lot (which means you'd probably hate it.. ha) 

 

I have seen Burton's first Batman, but that's it from that series.  I have them on blu-ray, so I will be watching them, in time.  I liked Jack as "The Joker" and, of course, "Batdance".

 

I have not seen any of the Batman reboots (with the Christian Bale, etc)  so I can't comment on how they compare. I DID like the new Superman film that came out a few years ago. (Man of Steel) it has a much different take on General Zod (and his cohorts too) than the 80's movie. There is a bigger "back story" with Jor-El and Krypton (and its demise) than the 80's films. I don't know whether you'd like it or not. The 80's Zod is nothing like this newer one. But overall.. I liked the new film.  Though I do confess it got a bit tedious at times (with the ridiculously LONGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG fight scenes. Especially the one between Kal-el and Gen. Zod.)  OH my golly I just wanted them to END it already. ha.  But other than that.. I really did enjoy Man of Steel pretty well. 

 

I've seen Batman Begins and The Dark Knight but not The Dark Knight Rises.  I haven't seen Man of Steel.  Christopher Nolan directed the Batman pics and co-wrote the story of Man of Steel.  I can't see you liking the Batman reboot.  Probably too dark for you.

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Howdy, Ma Stone

 

Howdy Jabez...  

 

I can't believe it's your dad who watched The A Team!  That's pretty remarkable, actually.  I can't say many from his generation would watch such a show

 

Well, there is no accounting for tastes sometimes.. ha. My brothers all liked it too. (they were still in highschool and junior high for the most part... that was likely more the standard audience for that show, overall) But you never know why someone will like something. I once dated a boy (way... way back when I was in highschool. You know.. practically dinosaur days. ha) and his little sister (she was 7) ABSOLUTELY l-o-v-e LOVED The Dukes of Hazard. If you knew that little girl, you'd NEVER have suspected she would.. very prissy.. very much a "princess" but oh me.. every time that show was on, she was right there, asking to watch it. If I was visiting them and it was time for the Dukes.. oh yeah, the whole world had to stop and we all got to watch Rosco P. Coltrane and Boss Hogg try and get one step ahead of those Duke boys. ha. Again.. no accounting for tastes. We all just like what we like.. and usually have our own reasons. (but ha.. some of us have NO rhyme or reason.. I confess I likely have at least a FEW unexplainable favorites on my "hit list" too.) :D  

 

Ha!  I'm guessing I'll just like it enough because I like Superman and Christopher Reeve as he

 

 

I liked him in the first one.. he was ok in the second. But oh me,  I am not kidding.. HOLD YOUR NOSE from there on out. ha!! 

 

I have seen Burton's first Batman, but that's it from that series.

 

Well, again, I wish I could say ANYthing nice about the series after that first one. But I just can't think of any good way to recommend them. I really did enjoy the first one a lot. After that, the best batman performance I can think of would be... the Batman character in The LEGO Movie, maybe. ha. (Now THERE was a super hero!! ha) :D

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5lUgBNBUC8 

 

(I haven't seen the Batman Lego Movie yet.. though. So I don't know how he holds up in any sequels) :D 

 

I've seen Batman Begins and The Dark Knight but not The Dark Knight Rises....  Christopher Nolan directed the Batman pics and co-wrote the story of Man of Steel.  I can't see you liking the Batman reboot.  Probably too dark for you.

 

Oh, you never know. "Dark" isn't as bothersome to me as "Dark with no good reason" ha. So it might or might not be. It really does depend on the story and the character. But I just never got that excited about those when they came out, so can't say if I will ever get around to them or not.

 

I haven't seen Man of Steel.

 

We really do like it a lot here at Casa de Ro. Even the QT is a fan.  There are things that are overdone about it though. (I was NOT kidding about the fight scenes and how LOOONGGG they last) But I remember reading that the guy who directed this movie was the same guy who made that 300 movie.. about all the Spartans.. fighting and fighting and fighting. ha. So maybe he likes that sort of action. ha. But if you can get past that.. I think Man of Steel really was a good telling of the Superman story. (at least for my money) Not sure if you will like it as much or not.  (But given our history, since I like it.. you'd probably hate it. HA!)

 

But it may be a stand alone fan moment for me. Even if I like that movie, I am not sure if we'll dive in to the whole "Justice League" stuff, though, now that that is all starting to come together. I still have not gotten past the really awful things I heard (and thought) about the Batman V Superman film when they were advertising it.. ha. It just looked too doofy. (not sure why.. I love the whole Marvel Avengers stuff.. and that has to be the height of doofiness. But it works for me, somehow. Doofy can be a very subjective thing sometimes, I guess. ha) :D  

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Good afternoon, Piecemaker -- Well, there is no accounting for tastes sometimes.. ha. My brothers all liked it too. (they were still in highschool and junior high for the most part... that was likely more the standard audience for that show, overall) But you never know why someone will like something. I once dated a boy (way... way back when I was in highschool. You know.. practically dinosaur days. ha) and his little sister (she was 7) ABSOLUTELY l-o-v-e LOVED The Dukes of Hazard. If you knew that little girl, you'd NEVER have suspected she would.. very prissy.. very much a "princess" but oh me.. every time that show was on, she was right there, asking to watch it. If I was visiting them and it was time for the Dukes.. oh yeah, the whole world had to stop and we all got to watch Rosco P. Coltrane and Boss Hogg try and get one step ahead of those Duke boys. ha. Again.. no accounting for tastes. We all just like what we like.. and usually have our own reasons. (but ha.. some of us have NO rhyme or reason.. I confess I likely have at least a FEW unexplainable favorites on my "hit list" too.)

 

A Dukes of Hazzard lady?!  My kind of girl!

 

After that, the best batman performance I can think of would be... the Batman character in The LEGO Movie, maybe. ha. (Now THERE was a super hero!! ha)

 

I definitely love the Will Arnett "Batman" from the LEGO series.  My favorite is Adam West, followed by Kevin Conroy, who voiced "Batman" on the Animated Series.

 

But it may be a stand alone fan moment for me. Even if I like that movie, I am not sure if we'll dive in to the whole "Justice League" stuff, though, now that that is all starting to come together. I still have not gotten past the really awful things I heard (and thought) about the Batman V Superman film when they were advertising it.. ha. It just looked too doofy. (not sure why.. I love the whole Marvel Avengers stuff.. and that has to be the height of doofiness. But it works for me, somehow. Doofy can be a very subjective thing sometimes, I guess. ha)

 

Yeah, I heard bad things about that film, too.  It's trouble when the boys in my family think it's not that good.  They love everything.  I'm a DC fan more than Marvel but the Marvel films are currently done better.

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  • 3 years later...
On 9/4/2010 at 5:07 AM, movieman1957 said:

Thanks. I don't think I have a copy of it. (Where's Lafitte when you need him.) I'll have to do a little digging.

Laffite to the rescue. I've always been a little late. It was Beethoven 5th Piano Concerto, the slow movement. The subject was Picnic at Hanging Rock, a music clip therein.

Now that I am no longer needed, I'll crawl back in my hole. :lol:

EDIT : Actually I wasn't needed after all. Chris found it about a month later. :o

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Hello dere folks!  

Time is just an illusion!

Am I the only person in the world who thinks Vanessa Redgrave is annoying as hell in CAMELOT (just ran yesterday on TCM, followed by of all things SOYLENT GREEN, lol)?

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On 1/5/2010 at 9:35 PM, laffite said:

Bronxgirl48 wrote*Everytime I see the scene with Patrick Bedford and Ellen O"Mara, where he's correcting her love note, I wnat to throw HIM out a window.*

That was very nearly excruciating to watch. I wanted her so to interrupt him...but of course she couldn't. Later at the meeting he says, "What was I supposed to do?," which is incredibly stupid and Miss Barratt blurts out the obvious, "Talk to her," then she breaks off. Good thing I'm not the screenwriter, I would have put her in his face big time. It's hard to believe that anyone could be as insensitive as he, yet his example---perhaps the worst of the bunch---was one of many to show how jaded everyone seemed to be, for a reason or other, on how difficult these kids were to reach and the contempt and insensitivity staff members had for them, even the records keeper who blithely reduces some of the students to mere phrase for their chart. (And, God forbid, stay clear of that librarian, don't even touch Ivanhoe )

I agree that Sandy Dennis was really good. When that kid came to her to sign the paper because he wanted to drop out, Miss Barratt's face falls. It's so easy to take for granted Miss Barratt's desire to reach the kids because that's the movie, but Sandy really put it across in a way that was entirely believable and maybe even a bit touching.

And was the situation with Joe Farano left hanging, a loose end? And was there ambiguity in Miss Barratt when he confronted her in the classroom? With the second question, I tend to think not, she just wanted to help him all along. There seemed no resolution regarding him as if perhaps he is for the present unreachable. Or did she accomplish something by warding him off. I think that scene was unrealistic. I wish they had given her something more to say that would make his withdrawal more believable.

I'm really surprised on how good this movie is.

I've just re-watched this. I agree with everything I said except for that execrable idea that there is ambiguity in Miss Barratt's notions when cornered in the classroom by Joe Farano. Oh, brother, how did I come up with that?

I'm surprised to see the fraternization of students and teachers at a school dance. I was in high school in the early 60s and that would have never happened. I was in a regular high school, not one like in the movie. I couldn't believe it when Henrietta Pastorfield actually in tears over a crush she had with a student. Was that some kind joke? I looked on it like it was in the spirit of tongue-in cheek.

And a good double-take when Beatrice Schachter, a guidance counselor and Miss Barratt's mentor said during that walk in the snow that she (Miss Barratt) might not be so happy in a posh private school with all those teachers putting Chaucer on the students, "no doubt in Old English." It's impossible that a teacher with her experience wouldn't know that Chaucer wrote in Middle English. Old English had been defunct for five centuries prior to Chaucer. Did the movie want her to look stupid, or was it a goof? It might be the former because it is hard to believe that the screenwriters wouldn't know. Maybe they were looking for a bit of irony, even teachers don't know everything.

Barb, you mentioned way back there that Sandy Dennis had some annoying mannerisms. I know what you mean, she is a bit fastidious with that sort of thing but I confess they all went over my head in the sense I probably enjoyed them. I mean if you're a guy, that helps her be as adorable as she is.

All the business with keeping records and filling out forms etc etc was a good touch as well as a little creepy. That they would encapsulate an entire semester for each student with a carefully mandarin-like phrase or two is ludicrous and made me think of some futuristic dystopia or maybe something from Kafka. I think Miss Barratt might have bethought herself in one of these worlds, in a way.

I mentioned above about Joe Farano being a loose end. Well, he was the one that got away. You can't succeed with everyone. Is there something inconsistent about him? He's intelligent and well-spoken and acts like a brute. I think he is a good candidate for Socio-path status. And I was surprised that we didn't get more on Alice Blake. I guess she survived. Good. Well cast as a plain-Jane with nothing but love, love, love in her heart.

///

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/24/2009 at 8:22 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Miss Goddess, this is a delightful new home for us.

 

Speaking of which, here's a sketch of a Dutch colonial house I plan to move into (when my ship comes in....) where I can spend hours cozily nestled inside watching TCM, petting my golden retriever asleep near the fireplace, sipping hot apple cider (laced with rum), and thinking about how hot Pat O'Brien was in THE GREAT O'MALLEY. (no, really!)

 

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Nov 24, 2009 11:46 PM

Boy, Bronxie, you know how to live. Can i visit you. I promise I won't bark.

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On 1/4/2010 at 6:45 PM, MissGoddess said:

Oooh....you should DEFINITELY see Peter Ibbetson, Bronxie. I think it would enchant you with it's dreamy, old world romanticism and fantasy. It's on DVD.

Hi, MiisG. I'm not a Coop fan but this one I liked. They actually dreamed and the other has the same dream. Wow, what a way to communicate.

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On 1/15/2010 at 11:50 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Did anyone catch 36 HOURS?

 

I was disappointed overall -- Top-heavy plot, at once too clever and too lazy (one of the tip-offs for me (among many) in the so-called cleverness department is the apparent referential way Martin Kosleck is cast as a German officer -- he used to play Martin Goebbels a lot in B-movies of the '40's) As for the lazyness factor, Eva Marie Saint's nurse is a prime example, but I won't give away any spoilers. And unfortuntely, as much as I wanted to, I just couldn't buy Rod as a German, under any circumstances, even given the complexities of his character. He does give a very charismatic performance, however. The story just got more and more stupid and unbelievable during the second half, and I was almost nodding off.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Jan 16, 2010 2:51 AM

I haven't seen it but I like your remarks. I'll look for it. Sounds pretty grim, though.

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On 2/8/2010 at 1:11 PM, butterscotchgreer said:

Heehee! Ava-T, you made me laugh!!

Hello there, Greer. You know what today is. September 5, and if I remember correctly it's ...

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU !!!

On behalf of the entire group, hoping you have the most wonderful day (as well as all the other of your days)

If you see this, hope you drop in for a hello.

Hee, hee

From ALL

...

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On 5/1/2011 at 11:06 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

On my last viewing of THE INFORMER, I was struck by what I thought was the complexity of Gypo's and Frankie's relationship. Were they really such good friends? Frankie was the brains, Gypo the brawn, and it seemed they used each other more than they really "needed" one another. I couldn't tell if Frankie's teasing was good-natured or not. "I can't understand why my mother likes you". Is Frankie joshing, or does he have a mean streak? Does he secretly envy Gypo's strength while disparaging Nolan's slow-wittedness? Does Gypo resent Frankie's put-downs, and wishes he didn't have to rely on Frankie's smarts to stay one jump ahead in life, and especially in that difficult period? Every time I watch THE INFORMER, I get so mad at Gypo -- why doesn't he grab Katie and leave for America with the twenty pounds? I know he doesn't because of the guilt. Unconsciously, he must want to be caught and punished. Vic is so tremendous in this role, he deserved the Oscar and then some. In my opinion this is his finest performance, untoppable really. I'm always so inexplicably touched when Gypo blurts out at the wake: "I'm sorry for your troubles!" It's just so terribly moving to me, all the conflicting emotion he feels: guilt, anger, remorse, desperation.

I saw thid eons ago. I certainly didn't have the studied reaction than you have here. Probably back in my zombie mode with movies. Watching but no thinking. I'm still like that.

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On 9/5/2020 at 10:13 PM, laffite said:

Hi, MiisG. I'm not a Coop fan but this one I liked. They actually dreamed and the other has the same dream. Wow, what a way to communicate.

Hi Lafitte, so you liked Peter Ibbetson? I'm happy. I read the book, too, I was so taken with the story. I love plots that involve lovers communicating in, er, unorthodox ways when the world won't let them be together. It constitutes a whole sub-genre for me. Telepathic, time traveling love stories. We know so little still about how the mind works and how it connects with other minds. I think artists understand it intuitively and hence make these beautiful works to express their ideas about it. What's most astonishing is one-eyed, roaring action director Henry Hathaway was at the helm. He definitely had a soft side to him underneath that volcanic crust.

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On 9/5/2020 at 10:10 PM, laffite said:

"Speaking of which, here's a sketch of a Dutch colonial house I plan to move into (when my ship comes in....) where I can spend hours cozily nestled inside watching TCM, petting my golden retriever asleep near the fireplace, sipping hot apple cider (laced with rum), and thinking about how hot Pat O'Brien was in THE GREAT O'MALLEY. (no, really!)"

 

Boy, Bronxie, you know how to live. Can i visit you. I promise I won't bark.

Pat O'Brien holds a strange attraction for me. He's such a big, barking teddy bear. I feel like if I were ever getting pushed around by someone Pat would be there in an instant to rescue me.

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2 minutes ago, MissGoddess said:

Hi Lafitte, so you liked Peter Ibbetson? I'm happy. I read the book, too, I was so taken with the story. I love plots that involve lovers communicating in, er, unorthodox ways when the world won't let them be together. It constitutes a whole sub-genre for me. Telepathic, time traveling love stories. We know so little still about how the mind works and how it connects with other minds. I think artists understand it intuitively and hence make these beautiful works to express their ideas about it. What's most astonishing is one-eyed, roaring action director Henry Hathaway was at the helm. He definitely had a soft side to him underneath that volcanic crust.

Actually, it wasn't that they had the 'same dream' as I carelessly stated above, wasn't it  actually that each dreamt conversations (that they each remembered, something liked that. Anyway there was sure something unique about it.  But yes, I enjoyed and one reason is that i did not know what it was about so it came across as a nice surprise. I don't have the sentiment you have with regard to fantasy love stories (if you will) but this one survived.

That's a very nice paragraph you wrote up there, Miss G. Insightful. I guess the volcano was dormant. I'm trying to think of the word that is used when volcanoes are not active. Dormant?

I'm just now recalling that you once recommended DR BULL, a Will Rogers movie (as you know), but you had a sort of tentative notion that I might not like it. That was another goody that I thoroughly enjoyed. Very natural on screen with an unshakable believability (sp?)

Thanks, MissG

//

 

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1 minute ago, laffite said:

Actually, it wasn't that they had the 'same dream' as I carelessly stated above, wasn't it  actually that each dreamt conversations (that they each remembered, something liked that. Anyway there was sure something unique about it.  But yes, I enjoyed and one reason is that i did not know what it was about so it came across as a nice surprise. I don't have the sentiment you have with regard to fantasy love stories (if you will) but this one survived.

That's a very nice paragraph you wrote up there, Miss G. Insightful. I guess the volcano was dormant. I'm trying to think of the word that is used when volcanoes are not active. Dormant?

I'm just now recalling that you once recommended DR BULL, a Will Rogers movie (as you know), but you had a sort of tentative notion that I might not like it. That was another goody that I thoroughly enjoyed. Very natural on screen with an unshakable believability (sp?)

Thanks, MissG

//

 

I'd say Hathaway's softer side was indeed dormant for most of his career but he occasionally showed he was indeed a brilliant craftsman beyond shoot-em-ups and scaring John Wayne almost as much as Ford did.

I love Dr Bull! It's my favorite Rogers film. And he gets to have a love affair! A somewhat clandestine one, at that. Not your usual Rogers vehicle. He shows quite a bit asperity at small town narrow mindedness.

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19 minutes ago, MissGoddess said:

Pat O'Brien holds a strange attraction for me. He's such a big, barking teddy bear. I feel like if I were ever getting pushed around by someone Pat would be there in an instant to rescue me.

I know what you mean, actually. He could really get in your face when angry. Am I thinking of the right guy. Like a wolverine. Ever see a wolverine on film get angry. Lions run away from them, not because they are afraid, but because they just can't stand all that opposing energy, all that unrelenting hustle and bustle. Pesky little creatures, those wolverines. I can see Pat rescuing someone, he's fearless.

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