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RAMBLES Part II


MissGoddess
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Thanks for that CRACK-UP photo. Aww, poor Pat. He does look sweet and huggable there. Get away from him, you Lone Star women, you!

 

Take an aspirin before you see BOY MEETS GIRL. Pat and Jimmy's non-stop verbal acrobatics will leave your noggin' throbbin'. I think they must have made at least a half dozen movies together.

 

I've been having some computer problems; it's a wonder I'm able to post now.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Nov 28, 2009 8:02 PM

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Hello there, folks. Please forgive this brief interruption.

 

I just want to quickly mention a film that I saw today for the first time. (and I am so glad, because I FINALLY got to cross it off of my "wanna see" list). I was very happy to get to see this one as I have been waiting for nearly a year to finally watch it.

 

Mr. Grey, I believe you were the one who first recommended it to me... and I just want to tell you that I have finally gotten to see The Mortal Storm.

 

Oh my. What a powerful story. And very emotional too. I will stop there as I am STILL a bit emotional about it all... and I know if I keep going it will turn into a full fledged ramble, (ha) and I don't want to derail anything that is ongoing already.

 

So I will simply say for now that this film has truly been worth waiting for, and again, I am very happy to get to see it.

 

Thanks very much, ladies, for letting me "miniramble" in the midst of your ongoing chat.

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Glad to have another fan of Sullavan and also *The Mortal Storm*.

 

When you realize this film was made in 1939, it's amazing how accurate it was to its time. I don't deny that many war films are propaganda, but I feel that in this movie, Borzage has simply tried to take facts as he understood them and present them within a storyline.

 

*Three Comrades* (1938) dropped hints, but *The Mortal Storm* flings the unvarnished truth into our laps and it is we who walk around the empty house, recalling all the memories it holds. While talk of concentration camps, censorship, and forced submission were news, many of these topics (particularly mistreatment of Jews) were buried on back pages of newspapers, if even printed.

 

The snowfall, silhouette of the professors statuette, quote, and cloud end title reminds us that although the world might seem dark from our perspective, goodness and light have not been extinguished. The clouds appearance at the beginning and end of the film suggests that while light and truth may be obscured by circumstances, the sun is always shining on the other side.

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> {quote:title=Arkadin wrote:}{quote}

> When you realize this film was made in 1939, it's amazing how accurate it was to its time. I don't deny that many war films are propaganda, but I feel that in this movie, Borzage has simply tried to take facts as he understood them and present them within a storyline.

 

I think this is indeed one of the very best films about the impending Nazi threat, that was actually made before America joined the Allies to defeat the Axis. It's all the more remarkable because Borzage himself wasn't an European exile; yet being born in America didn't stop him from having a clear understanding of what a horrible thread to humanity Nazis represented.

 

Truly, a great movie, as compelling today as it must have been back in 1939.

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I better get this post in now while my computer seems to be o.k. (for the moment) Saw THE MORTAL STORM this afternoon, after many years. It used to play a lot back in the Bronx. I can barely watch the ending with Margaret Sullavan and James Stewart; it's extremely moving and I cry every time.

 

I never noticed it before, but Stewart's reaction to the tragic event on the ski slope, and his helplessness, anticipate the range of emotions on his face in REAR WINDOW as he's watching Lisa being victimized by Lars Thorwald.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Nov 28, 2009 8:19 PM

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Hi Arkadin,

 

Glad to have another fan of Sullavan and also The Mortal Storm.

 

I do enjoy Sullavan. (I always liked her in The Shop Around the Corner... but I got to see her in The Good Fairy earlier this year and really enjoyed that as well) I don't recall ever seeing her in a drama like this before (but I am just not as familiar w/ her work as others, I am sure) She did a very good job in this film.

 

And as for The Mortal Storm.... Wow, watta story. I mentioned earlier that I found it very emotional but I also found it to be very "realistic" too, in the way it portrayed the various mindsets of the different characters as well.

 

When you realize this film was made in 1939, it's amazing how accurate it was to its time. I don't deny that many war films are propaganda, but I feel that in this movie, Borzage has simply tried to take facts as he understood them and present them within a storyline.

 

I mentioned something like this elsewhere, earlier this evening, but I like how the film seemed so relatable (at least to me) to human nature in general even though it was supposed to be about a specific moment in history in a specific part of the world.

 

Even though I knew it was about Germans, in Germany,(under Hitler) it COULD be any family's story. Because as frightening as this period in history is (in terms of seeing how FAR human beings can allow themselves to be blindly led by one determined and charismatic person to the point where they all but lose any ability to think for themselves) as the story unfolded it began to seem to me as if it could be ANY country...and ANY group of people.

 

And that to me is what was the most gut wrenching thing about this story. It pained me to see how quickly the Nazi mindset pervaded the average person, and how easily some people developed a blind and absolute faith in their government and its politics and its leader. (And how quickly turned brothers and friends became against their family and loved ones.)

 

At least it seemed like it all happened so easily... at the beginning anyway. To see how FAR some of the characters fully immersed themselves in the Nazi way of thinking (at the expense even of their own family's lives) to me just made the hair stand up on the back of my neck and filled my throat with a HUGE emotional lump (to think a child of mine could end up that way) UGH. What an emotional concept.

 

At any rate, although this film was made as history was STILL unfolding, it WAS very accurate (And I find it all very frightening to see how close it truly did portray things, almost prophetic in a way.)

 

The snowfall, silhouette of the professors statuette, quote, and cloud end title reminds us that although the world might seem dark from our perspective, goodness and light have not been extinguished.

 

There was a message of hope in the narration at the end ( and in the one brother as well) that at least gave me a sense of peace and brought it all into perspective for me at the end. But I still know how dark a time this truly was in human history, and it gives me pause.

 

Again, I am TRULY glad to have caught this film (and not fallen vicitm to a DUH attack like I usually do when it comes to remembering the TCM schedule, ha) It took me almost a year to get to see this one, but it was VERY much worth the wait.

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Nov 28, 2009 8:42 PM

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I kind of watched *The Mortal Storm* today while at a friend's house (but with two screaming kids around it was rugged). I've seen it a few times, though, and it's a wonderful, painful film. I'm glad you got a chance to watch it, Miss Peacemaker. The ending kills me, too. Sullavan played quite a few tragic heroines.

 

Oh, and I made two new fans of The Devil and Daniel Webster while I was visiting. My friend commented that the very last shot, of Walter Huston, was one of the best endings they'd ever seen. :)

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> >

> > I've been having some computer problems; it's a wonder I'm able to post now.

> >

>

> Did you try doing this?

>

> kitten694_05.jpg

 

HA! Awww.

 

Oh, here I am now, after TWO HOURS of trying this morning, consarn it!!

 

I've also been desperate enough to try some of Angela Lansbury's spells from BEDKNOBS AND BROOMSTICKS. What are they -- "Treguna, Mekoides, Hakuna Matata, lol." or is it "Perigee, Apogee, Applesauce..."

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""Treguna, Mekoides, Hakuna Matata, lol." or is it "Perigee, Apogee, Applesauce..."

 

Do you think that spell will work on pest control?? It's a big property Miss Goddess hooked up for us here (scroll through the pages and see the grounds, the rooms, the views). We're bound to have some creepy crawlies infest the Rambles Manor. I say squash 'em like a bug, but if the above chant is more humane...

 

Oh Egan. EGAN!!! The Raid please.

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I kind of watched The Mortal Storm today while at a friend's house (but with two screaming kids around it was rugged

 

Ha... well it can be a bit of a distraction if you aren't used to "WILD CHILD syndrome, ha. I have devised a techinque for that (when the kidling and the QT get too rowdy while I am watching tv..ha. I have had to start using the closed caption sometimes. Ha. But sometimes I still have to pull out the old "MOM" voice with a sturdy, "HEY, I'm watchin', here." Ha.

 

it's a wonderful, painful film. I'm glad you got a chance to watch it, Miss Peacemaker. The ending kills me, too. Sullavan played quite a few tragic heroines.

 

OH me, I am still working my way aroung that huge LUMP in my throat everytime I think about this movie today. It really was a very emotional film for me in a way that I did not expect. And Ms. Sullavan did "do" tragedy very well (if I can judge by this performance) RE: the ending... the part that just was so uplifting to me (after all that tragedy) was the bit w/ the two brothers after Young tells them what happened.

 

(MINI SPOILER ALERT: When the one brother complained that Stewart's character was going to be free now to fight against all they stood for, I just wanted to stand up and cheer when Robert Stack said, "Thank God", WOW what a great resolution for his character. I kept expecting to see his arm band laying in the snow beside his foot prints as the camera led to the walk way outside.)

 

You know I wanted to recommend this film to a couple of friends of mine, so I went googling around after the fact, HA.. I found this film on YOUTUBE. I could have watched it SO much sooner, but it never occured to me to look on there for this one. At any rate, I say (YET AGAIN) I am so very happy that I was able to watch it yesterday. The story itself would have been worth watching even if just taken on the surface, but for me at least, I just found SO many layers with all the characters and the plot that it truly affected me on an emotional level in a way I never expected.

 

Oh, and I made two new fans of The Devil and Daniel Webster while I was visiting. My friend commented that the very last shot, of Walter Huston, was one of the best endings they'd ever seen.

 

Now THAT's a movie with a lot of layers TOO. Ha. I am glad to hear that old Dan'l made some new fans. (or rather Mr. Scratch, ha. He WAS the most likeable guy I ever saw, for someone I just wanted to HATE so much. Creepy yet entertaining all at the same time, ha)

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2006_12180006.jpg

 

Skirting the coast of TCM City on the lookout for the Rambles Manor. That viewing room theater (and those rooms!) that *Movieman* posted looks a little opulent for a mangy ole pirate but said pirate is thinking he may be allowed entrance so long he leaves his sword at the door (unless a swashbuckler is being shown in which case a pirate must, of course, be armed).

 

The above is a snapshot from Down to the Sea in Ships, a silent from ?22 that has great ships-at-sea sequences. In the above, the camera is stationary and the ship is going at an appreciable speed passing the camera to on the left side, a very neat passing shot.

 

laffitelogo.jpg

Laffite

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Welcome Pirate. I'm sure a nice room awaits you. They take Master Card, Visa, Euros, Gold Dubloons, Dollars and Pounds. Don't track any mud in the entrance and all should be okay.

 

Take your sword and boots off (or call the chambermaid of your choice to help you with that), unpack, shower (that salt ocean water just can't be good for your hair) get comfy and be on the lookout for the next movie to be rambled about.

 

Welcome to Rambles Part II!! I'm already envisioning Pina Coladas on your yacht. Or is that a boat? Dingy? Sam-Pan? What the h--

:-)

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*Welcome Pirate. I'm sure a nice room awaits you. They take Master Card, Visa, Euros, Gold Dubloons, Dollars and Pounds.*

 

*CineMaven*, Great! I have doubloons and whatever else I've been able to plund---um, acquire :D here and there. But I'm afraid I don't have any of those other cards. I usually use PlunderCardExtreme. Does that work? Or should leave that one on the ship? :D

 

*Jackie*, thanks to you as well. Now that's what I call a hostess. For a moment there I thought that might be Mary :x :x :x Astor but I realize now that it is sweet :x :x :x Olivia. I love her too. Thanks for finding that :)

 

L.

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*OOPS!*

 

*I sent out the wrong welcoming party!*

 

I'll take both, heh heh. A pirate can never have too many hostessessess...especially astors and olivias :x

 

Thanks.

 

Have you covered Miss Mary over in Brunettes?

 

Dscf0011em.jpg

 

Here she is from Don Juan (1926). She looks about the same age as in the pic you sent. I love that picture, thanks. I took the above off TV with a digital camera some time ago. When she is put in prison Lucretia (Estelle Taylor) says, "Neri will be delighted." Needless to say Neri is not exactly a nice man. Happily she is saved by the Don (as we all know :) ).

 

L.

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You know, I was thinking about adding Mary over in Brunettes, but I have to compile more pics of her.

 

And I have some Victor Mature photos to post first....

 

I'll see what I can come up with.

 

I can't believe you took that picture from the TV! It's gorgeous. she looks so luminous.

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Who says pirates aren't smart. The last time I took a photo off the television, the Beatles were appearing on Ed Sullivan and I was going to take their picture and bring it to school. Used a

flash on the camera to be sure they'd come out.

 

I got some great shots...of the television set.

 

Olivia and Mary. Mary and Olivia. Oh what's a pirate to do.

 

(P.S. Forty years later they both appear in "Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte").

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