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MADHAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (woo hoo!!)

 

Long time NO see the Mad Hat name on the message board!!! So very glad to see you out and about sir. Glad to have you back among the crowd, my friend.

 

OH and PS: I guess I will go put my rope back in the FREEZER now... because well... if you had not shown up soon, you were only days away from being the honored guest at our next Neck Tie Party. :PMissed it by THAT much! ha.

 

> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> I have a nicely refurbished computer, named Gloria, and my first pair of reading glasses! I've had my computer for a few days but I had to avoid using it until I got the glasses. The headaches had become unbearable! I'm still trying to get used to them so if my post turns to gibberish you'll know I've either lost it completely or I just need more practice...or both. :)

 

Ha.. a new Gloria AND new glasses too. You'll have a whole new outlook on life for sure. ha. (PS: Welcome to the "corrective lens crowd, too... I have been a charter member now for several years.. ha. I always joke with the QT that I hit forty.. and forty hit me back.. ha)

 

> Ro,

> I really liked your post on *The Wizard of Oz* and everyone's comments on it. It has been ages since I watched the film all the way through but I feel like I know it by heart. Still, your screencaps brought up so much that I never noticed before.

 

Thanks, sir. I love finding new things to like about an old favorite like this one. Glad you picked up on some new stuff too.

 

> Now I, like so many others, remember this airing once a year on television back before cable and DVD's or even videotape. There was never any question what the the TV would be tuned to that evening. I was the youngest, so I was the last holdout. My older siblings would usually watch too. We waited for certain scenes like the house landing, and the lollipop guild song, and the flying monkeys. I don't know at what age I stopped lying on the living room floor in front of the old Sylvania console watching it intently from start to finish. I imagine it was a gradual process. I wonder if mom was sad the first time it came on and none of us kids were around to watch it.

 

I bet she was. I can tell you that some of the kidlings favorite little "kiddie" shows that she used to love (but has since outgrown still make me "misty" just thinking about how much she enjoyed them when she was little. (ha) The day she ever "outgrows" OZ (even if only temporarily) will be a day I bust out bawling for sure. But I like that this is a film that even if you get too old (say as a teen) where it loses a little "luster" for a time... once you see it again after several years of NOT seeing it... those fond memories will just come flooding back. It truly is a classic in ever sense of the word.

 

 

> The film does a wonderful job exploring the dreams and fears of childhood. The idea of escaping and the adventure of running away mixes wonderfully with our fears of losing our home, our parents, our place and our sense of where we belong. These are concepts that weigh on the mind of most kids. They certainly did for me anyway. The biggest hook in the film for me is Dorothy's fear of losing Toto. That's what starts the ball rolling. The idea of anyone taking my dog away scared me to death. My dog depended on me. I was his protector, and we protected each other. It's one of the few responsibilities a kid first senses.Losing a pet is often the first real loss a kid faces. I could relate to Dorothy's fears and I was with her all the way in trying to find a place to escape with Toto.

 

OH wow... when Miss Gulch goes after Toto.. ha. that used to make me SO mad. ha. (but not so scared..ha) But one thing I DID used to be afraid of as a very young kid was of getting "lost" or of being away from my parents for too long of a time. And I always remember that I felt so worried when Dorothy wants to go home... and the baloon floats away. It was always such a relief to see Glinda's little pink bubble show up just at the right moment, ha.

 

 

> This was another thing that really scared me as a kid. That tornado! Wow! With Bolger yelling out: It's a twister, it's a twister. We don't get many in these parts, but still, I knew they existed and to this day a tornado warning really scares me and excites me all at the same time. It has to be the greatest tornado sequence ever filmed.

 

I had never really seen or heard much about a Tornado other than this film until I was in about the 4th grade or so.. We lived in Alabama at the time (at Ft Mc Clellan) and and then I remember they had a tornado come near us one day while we were at school and all of us kids had to go out in the hall and cover our heads with our hands. It was a little scary, as I recall, and then I remember thinking about that moment again the next time I watched The Wizard of Oz (probably that same year) and then I got scared all over again, ha)

 

> The only thing I never cared for, and the only thing that slows down the film is the cowardly lion's song If I were King of the forest.

 

OH say it isn't SO!!! (that is just about my most favorite song in the whole thing.. ha. The kidlingl loves it too. We go around here singing it all the time! She is a RIOT trying to imitate his voice.. especially when it comes to the part where he says, "Mah... aha ha ha ha... aw-narch". What a crack up! ha.

 

> Now, I must comment on *Heat Lightning* and get down to the noir thread, I hear someone sent out an APB! :) I have a lot of catching up to do! I hope my eyes hold out!

 

WOO hoo... I will look forward to hearing your thoughts on THAT one. It really was quite a film, wasn't it??

 

PS... I LOVED those old 70's detective shows (and I was a night owl too.. (I know.. big surprise,ha) but usually only got to be a practicing one during summer vacation, ha) I was not TOO keen on Barnaby Jones, but I did like Ironside, and I absolutely ADORED The Rockford Files. OH wow.

 

OH... and I L-O-V-E loved Kolchak, The NightStalker.

 

 

 

But BOY did it give me the chills sometimes. ha. When it came to the scary parts, I think this show must have been where I perfected my infamous "Right hand at an angle over both eyes" routine. ha. That way, I could still watch the top right portion and the lower left portion of the tv screen, and since MOST of the scary stuff happens in the middle.. I was safe. ha. :-)

 

Glad to see you back on the board, sir. :-)

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*OH... and I L-O-V-E loved Kolchak, The NightStalker.*

 

Another blast from my past and another show I loved. A vampire stalker in Las Vegas, doesn't get any better than that in my hometown!

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"?I loved the horror stuff too. That one scene really scared me though. Maybe it was just Grayson Hall, she always scared me.?

 

Hmmm, I think about her in "NIGHT OF THE IGUANA" Molo and...ha...I thought it was you Molo.

 

Molo? Molo?! MOLO???????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

YOU'RE BACK!!! YOU'RE BACK!!!

 

How I missed you. How we ALL missed, as I can see from the posts I've just read. You were gone soooooo long, I put out an APB out on you.

 

I'm so glad to see you're back. You have a keen perspective on classic films that we all enjoy reading and the warmth of your memories and persona wraps me like a blanket.

 

MadHattttttttttttttttttttt's back...and the Message Board's got him. (And with him comes more appreciation for the fabulous Double G...always a good thaaang).

 

Yep, I'm glad you're back MadHat Molo!!!

 

--

 

"Ah yes, the words "A Quinn Martin production"....

 

 

Hey who knew "tonight's episode" was about this board."

 

OMG! MissGoddess...that made me BURST OUT LAUGHING!!

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Molo's comment about a dog's value to a child - I'd somehow forgotten to give credit to this aspect of the film. Larry, I think you're dead-on perfect with this - the family dog and children being told "he's your responsibility! Do you think you can handle it?" is probably the first big step a child has in that regard.

 

Then to see Toto be taken away! And from that point on, he really is an action-setter for the film, even walking over to the Wizard's curtain... "Pay no attention..." I love that.

 

As for Bert Lahr's bad IF I WAS THE KING OF THE FOREST... yes, pretty dreadful song BUT I've come to adore his vocal controls. Today's pop tarts try their best and they might even use better songs. But in a 100 years, all the songbird throat twillers won't be around, while I'll bet Bert's still singin' his for audiences.

 

He really does get to overact so much, and he does it so well - such vigor, such gusto. I tell ya, if my time-machine gets built, I'm definitely snagging the cast and crew and making sure they spend a few hours talking about those scenes, their rehearsal time, what they thought of the film as they worked on it, and years later, what their reaction would be.

 

(Larry - I'll always laugh and cheer with any Jesse White pix you slip in there. He steals that film so wonderfully. I probably couldn't watch it a hundred times for just Cecil Kellaway and the sisters, but Jesse's carting her upstairs, then into the bathtub... oh my...)

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Ollie, Molo---the bit about he dog being taken away really upset me as a kid, too. I was ALWAYS terribly, terribly attached to my pets so I could identify with Dorothy's feelings there.

 

I grew up in Tornado country so that scene, too, was ultra scary to me and it still is. Ha, Ro, I remember those Tornado drills at school where we all were herded into the hallways and had to get down and cover our heads. And the scariest sound would be when the town's tornado warning sirens went off.

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Ollie, when you get that time machine ready for production, would you please make a little space on the side to pack in the cast of "ALL ABOUT EVE"? Yeah yeah, we could always buy the book "All About 'All About Eve'" but it wouldn't be nearly as much fun as having the cast in the capsule talking about the making of this film.

 

I saw it yesterday at TCM's free screening in NYC's beautiful Ziegfeld Theatre. I've seen it many times before...but not up on a big screen and not with sooooooooo many movie buffs sharing the experience in the quiet darkened theatre.

 

So remember, I'm putting in my bid right now for a teensy little space in your time machine. Hmmm, you know...on second thought...with Bette Davis and Anne Baxter, I think you're gonna need a bigger boat.

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>

> So remember, I'm putting in my bid right now for a teensy little space in your time machine. Hmmm, you know...on second thought...with Bette Davis and Anne Baxter, I think you're gonna need a bigger boat.

 

Ha!!!!

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Oh gosh, I hear you guys! The taking Toto part used to make me cry and cry. And those tornado sirens are so awful - we used to have one across the street and cattycorner from our house, and the sound used to rattle our windows and doors when it would turn our direction. We would go and hide in the closet when we were little. SOmetimes we slept through it, how, I don't know. :)

 

At my first school, I remember going OUTSIDE to a cement one sided lean-to, a tornado shelter built into the side of a ditch. Nothing much better in the next few years, since we hid under our desks. Then I moved to Illinois, where we would be led downstairs to the girls and boys restrooms to stand in rows and out into the cement block hallway. We were jealous of the teachers who were always standing up in the stairwell looking out the windows or doors to see if they could see anything.

 

I used to sneak out and watch movies at night too.... my sister actually had a mirror rigged up on her dresser, and she had it turned just so - so she could watch TV down the hall.... sometimes we would sneak down to the end of the hallway and watch right behind our parents backs. That didn't happen too much because they always caught us. When I moved to Illinois, I guess I was getting older, because my mom let me stay up real late on weekends to watch movies. I very clearly remember the first time I saw *Pride and Prejudice*, and also I think *The Informer* at 2 in the morning. I've already mentioned that certain movies were on a LOT on certain stations, like *Prisoner of Shark Island* and *The Man in the Iron Mask* with Louis Hayward. Obviusly that station was really into movies about locking people up in chains.

 

*Night Gallery* gave me the creeps - especially one set in Ireland in a bog with William Windom and a scary voodoo doll..... ewwwww! And another with Ross Martin as a slimey jerk who gets locked into into a pit in the ground. Maybe that one had WIlliam Windom too? It seems he was in everything when I was a kid. I'm not sure, it might have been John Carradine.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 24, 2010 12:26 PM

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"He really does get to overact so much, and he does it so well - such vigor, such gusto. I tell ya, if my time-machine gets built, I'm definitely snagging the cast and crew and making sure they spend a few hours talking about those scenes, their rehearsal time, what they thought of the film as they worked on it, and years later, what their reaction would be." - < OllieT >

 

Well, in re-reading Ollie's post...looks like his machine will bring a film's cast and crew to us. Think about it...get back to me when you can.

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This brings up some real ethical questions for me. If I bring the cast and crew of *My Man Godfrey* here, do I have to abide by the Star Trek prime directive? Can I tell Carole Lombard NOT to take any plane flights? Do I casually mention to William Powell that he better put the ring on Jean Harlow's finger?

 

It's a quandary.

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> I used to sneak out and watch movies at night too.... my sister actually had a mirror rigged up on her dresser, and she had it turned just so - so she could watch TV down the hall.... sometimes we would sneak down to the end of the hallway and watch right behind our parents backs. That didn't happen too much because they always caught us.

 

That set-up with the mirror sounds ingenious!

 

> When I moved to Illinois, I guess I was getting older, because my mom let me stay up real late on weekends to watch movies. I very clearly remember the first time I saw *Pride and Prejudice*, and also I think *The Informer* at 2 in the morning. I've already mentioned that certain movies were on a LOT on certain stations, like *Prisoner of Shark Island* and *The Man in the Iron Mask* with Louis Hayward. Obviusly that station was really into movies about locking people up in chains.

>

 

All of you have much better memories of what movies were on, specifically. I just have a vaguely general list of films I must have seen between ages 6 and 13. Gone With the Wind remains the one I can recall with any specificity. And I can't forget the arguments with my mother over whether I could watch the Jimmy Stewart movie or her favorite TV show. You can guess that she always won. :D

 

 

> *Night Gallery* gave me the creeps - especially one set in Ireland in a bog with William Windom and a scary voodoo doll..... ewwwww! And another with Ross Martin as a slimey jerk who gets locked into into a pit in the ground. Maybe that one had WIlliam Windom too? It seems he was in everything when I was a kid. I'm not sure, it might have been John Carradine.

>

 

I don't remember any of the episodes. I will have to rent the show one of these days. I rented some of "The Night Stalker" not long ago, and was a little disappointed it wasn't as scary as I remembered. Sometimes it's best not to go back!

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>That set-up with the mirror sounds ingenious!

 

It was ingenious! I would never have thought of it. My sis was six years older than me, so she always seemed so cool.... she was very into spying at that time, so the mirror thing was part of that.

 

 

>All of you have much better memories of what movies were on, specifically. I just have a vaguely general list of films I must have seen between ages 6 and 13. Gone With the Wind remains the one I can recall with any specificity. And I can't forget the arguments with my mother over whether I could watch the Jimmy Stewart movie or her favorite TV show. You can guess that she always won. :D

 

The ones I mentioned are about the only specific movies I have a memory of - although I do remember watching *The Grapes of Wrath* and being terribly, terribly moved by it. I completely broke down after watching it. It's funny that the movies I remember are the Ford films..... probably because he really got to me emotionally.

 

I remember *The Thief of Baghdad*, because it was a big deal - we stayed up on New Year's Eve to watch it. The giant spider scared the bejesus out of me and then I threw up.

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"I remember The Thief of Baghdad, because it was a big deal - we stayed up on New Year's Eve to watch it. The giant spider scared the bejesus out of me and then I threw up."

 

Aaaaaah, the wimpy little sister. Oh boy!!! (Spoken as the oldest of three siblings). Sounds like your big sister was a veritable Agent 99 with her mirror thing. Ooops my baaad. That's sexist.

 

She's McGuyver.

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I think the less intrusive act would be for us to go back in time and let them comfortably discuss their works rather than startle and distract them with bringing them into their future. That said, as a controller of Time, there wouldn't be any need for Lists, First, Second, Third... we'd just pop in and out whenever and as often as we like. Right? I mean, as long as we're dreamin', I ain't gonna set up limitations...

 

One of interesting themes I've been reading here has been the distinct memories of Late Night TV Theaters, particularly when scratchy reception and wintry nights added to an atmosphere that today's DVD players and microwave popcorn will never avail us.

 

We had a local host of afternoon childrens' shows from the late '40s into the early '70s, and while he passed away many years ago, I've been pleased to see our local paper maintains a nice (but of course too short) article covering his memories. They can't cover mine, of course. The thrill of getting a "ticket" to the show on birthdays, sitting in our own version of a peanut gallery (in-studio bleachers), then seeing him intro films on Saturdays - westerns, serials, Laurel & Hardy. Then the late-night monster films.

 

Ah yes, the days of antennas - boy, when I see those new HD antennas, I almost don't complain! "Can my kids have scratchy reception to help them get really scared?"

 

No... in the digital age, it's all blotchy, garbled - not scratchy - or just blank or frozen screens. I tell ya, the Analog Tech Horrors were often a great enhancement to films. Now, I'm just writing Ark saying, "Did you get a good copy? TimeWarner screwed up mine!"

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> We had a local host of afternoon childrens' shows from the late '40s into the early '70s, and while he passed away many years ago, I've been pleased to see our local paper maintains a nice (but of course too short) article covering his memories. They can't cover mine, of course. The thrill of getting a "ticket" to the show on birthdays, sitting in our own version of a peanut gallery (in-studio bleachers), then seeing him intro films on Saturdays - westerns, serials, Laurel & Hardy. Then the late-night monster films.

>

 

Oh, Ollie that is so adorable! It sounds just like the "Leave it Beaver" epi where the Beave and Larry (of course) play hooky from school to attend a TV showing just like that...and of course, get caught on camera! :D

 

>

> No... in the digital age, it's all blotchy, garbled - not scratchy - or just blank or frozen screens. I tell ya, the Analog Tech Horrors were often a great enhancement to films. Now, I'm just writing Ark saying, "Did you get a good copy? TimeWarner screwed up mine!"

LOL!!! I hear that.

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>

> The ones I mentioned are about the only specific movies I have a memory of - although I do remember watching *The Grapes of Wrath* and being terribly, terribly moved by it. I completely broke down after watching it. It's funny that the movies I remember are the Ford films..... probably because he really got to me emotionally.

>

 

YOu were a deeper and smarter lass than I. If I saw TGoW at that age, I'm sure I hated it. I didn't like heavy/socially serious movies like that back then, unless it was To Kill a Mockingbird or something else that seemed more "accessible" to my superficial tastes in movies which tended to run at it's deepest to William Wyler or Jimmy Stewart flicks. :D

 

I avoided TGoW for years. Stupid, I know.

 

> I remember *The Thief of Baghdad*, because it was a big deal - we stayed up on New Year's Eve to watch it. The giant spider scared the bejesus out of me and then I threw up.

 

I remember the spider scaring the heck out of me, too!!!

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I think I was at least twelve when I saw TGofW and it really changed my life. I became aware of other people.

 

As for bad reception and middle of the night viewings - we had Creature Features in the Chicago area and I remember the opening had an outline drawing at the beginning of the show that was of Spencer Tracy's Mr. Hyde - CREEPY! Oh, the glory of watching The Wolf Man, Frankenstein, and Dracula (not to mention the sons of...and the return of....) AT NIGHT....IN THE DARK!

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Mar 24, 2010 3:21 PM

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> As for bad reception and middle of the night viewings - we had Creature Features in the Chicago area and I remember the opening had an outline drawing at the beginning of the show that was of Spencer Tracy's Mr. Hyde - CREEPY! Oh, the glory of watching The Wolf Man, Frankenstein, and Dracula (not to mention the sons of...and the return of....) AT NIGHT....IN THE DARK!

>

 

Nothing beats it!

 

Here's a little trip down movie monster memory lane:

 

 

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Speaking of throwing up, I remember as a child throwing up at the theater during Cecil B. DeMille's THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. Some of us are movie critics at an early age! The best I can recall, it was during a scene where someone was tied to a post and being tortured.

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