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GAD! What a lineup! That looks like an incredible bunch of movies, Mava.

 

Do you have any particular ones picked out for special viewing? The Bette Davis one looks good, and Lew Ayres, James Dunn and Linda Darnell are the ones I find most interesting. Plus of course the cracking Lee Tracy.

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I have to really check the schedule thoroughly. I'm a tad bleary eyed from the two-drink minimum at SOB's. But I think I'll be back & forth at the Film Forum. May of those films I want to see on the big screen and now being retired....what's stoppin' me.

 

Come to NY. Let's go to the movies. ( I don't share my candy, though).

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> I have to really check the schedule thoroughly. I'm a tad bleary eyed from the two-drink minimum at SOB's. But I think I'll be back & forth at the Film Forum. May of those films I want to see on the big screen and now being retired....what's stoppin' me.

 

You television personalities lead such in-ter-es-ting lives.... like everyone else, I wish I were you, flitting about the city and having adventures!

 

> Come to NY. Let's go to the movies. ( I don't share my candy, though).

 

 

Me neither.... and you don't know how close I am to taking you up on it. I feel like a shut in lately.

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Yeah...it's great to be me.

 

I'm not joking about the visit. Look at the schedule, pick a movie...a day. Stay at a Howard Johnson or Days Inn (or Hilton if you're super-baaaad), bring your own munchies and lets do this thaang.

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Well...NYC has plenty of sights to see 4 your family, while we do our classic movies thing. Think about it. Hey, isn't it Easter break coming up for the kids?

 

You are getting sleepy. Your eyes are getting heavy. You are on a plane...or train...or bus. You are crossing over the George Washington Bridge...the Manhattan Skyline is in view...Film Forum... *BAM...moooooovies....shopping....

 

Edited by: CineMaven on Mar 26, 2010 12:01 PM: * Brooklyn Academy of Music (is BAM)

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I tell ya, this just gets worser and worser.

 

Just when I think this thread's hit an impossible new depth, now JF and CM are threatening the world's desmise by conquering NYC?!! Oh noooo...

 

Where's SCSU? This HAS to be 500 times worse, right?!! It's just GOTTA.

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We had Piggly Wigglies where I grew up in Texas! I remember their biggest rival in our town was Minyard's. I loved Piggyl Wiggly just for the name and the mascot.

 

Then Walmart came and really squashed a lot of competition. I confess I liked Walmart, I could buy movies and cd's there as well as everything else under the sun. In a small town, things like that take on an unaccustomed importance. :)

 

piggly_wiggly_1950s.jpg"

 

And piggies are supposed to be chubby! How can they PC-ize that cutie?!

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> *Was she getting Brian Donlevy too?*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He was in THE BEGINNING OR THE END but I don't think anyone has ever seen it, including me.

>

> No, thank goodness*

>

> *Did you have to take her to the Piggley-Wiggley?*

>

> No, Now this I don't get. :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You will. And if you visit her, make sure to take along an extra can of salmon.

>

> *I could never take TDTESS "seriously" anymore since being alerted to that big zipper on Gort*

>

> Ha! I'm going to put that out of my mind now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talk about willing suspension of disbelief.

>

> *I can't watch THEM! without shuddering, because I remember when I confused a fire ant on my living room carpet with some black thread.*

>

> Yes I was worried it might bring up some bad memories for you. The film starts off so well but it really turns when the kids get stuck in the underground tunnels. Does L.A. have a river or not?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L.A. has a lot of water, if I remember CHINATOWN correctly.

>

> *EARTH VS. THE FLYING SAUCERS has some good spfx. Hugh Marlowe if I remember correctly is an idiot in this one (and has a hairy back I think)*

>

> I didn't notice the hairy back but he is pretty idiotic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't know which is worse -- hairy backs, noses, or knuckles.

>

> *Isn't THE MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD with Tim Holt? He was such a cutie pie*

>

> Yes Holt is the Commander and he's cranky in this one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Holt cranky? Wait a minute -- he did have some sour moments in THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS.

>

> *THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS is imo the best of the monster-on-the rampage films from the '50's -- I think it's a bit better than GODZILLA even. The opening in the Antarctic is pretty eerie (reminds me of THE THING and parts of THE CRAWLING EYE) And the story isn't really bogged down heavily with romance, and there's a welcome absence of "comedy" relief and, miraculously, there's no stupid dialogue!*

>

> You have quite an eye for this sort of thing! The rampage through New York is great. You get Cecil Kellaway as the old scientist in this one. It takes little while for Paul Hubschmid to convince people he's not nuts. In the end you feel bad for the beast.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love Cecil as the paleontologist. Though I don't know how wise it was for his assistant to allow him to make that underwater trip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

>

> *As for those crustaceans, I said it before and I'll say it again:*

>

> *They're jolly!*

>

> Great! I'm looking forward to it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have plenty of drawn butter on hand.

 

Oh! JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS is on right now! I love it! My favorites are those harpies, and, of course, the skeletons.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Mar 26, 2010 8:07 PM

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I just taped "Jason and the Argonauts" and will watch it over this weekend. I introduced my seven year old nephew this movie when he was three. He loved it. He ran out into the living room to act out some scenes from the movie. He was the statue that came to life and he fought off the skeletons. My parents didn't know WHAT the heck he was showing them until I told them what we were watching in the other room. Everytime I call down there and talk to him, he says: "Remember Jason and the Argonauts?" Who knows how much he remembers, and how much is just going by rote.

 

But he is older now...and I'm going to take a trip down to Texas to take him to see the current "Clash of the Titans." Yeah, it ain't Harryhausen...but it looks like good rousing fun!!

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Mighty Mo,

 

I know that you and Glo are probably at some really ritzy cocktail party with the Charles' and the Chans', etc but I'm here at our watering hole waiting to talk about Veta and the Judge.

 

Get here soon or I'll be spiffed.

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While you and Madhat are getting spiffed, I have on "THE SNAKE PIT" in the background which TCM is airing. And it just hit me....Oliva DeHavilland (giving, IMHO, a marvelous performance) sounds just like the younger daughter in Hitchcock's "SHADOW OF A DOUBT."

 

Am I crazy?

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I chose to watch one of your movies last night, Snippy. I found it to be rather enjoyable. It's nothing but charming. It strongly reminded me of My Man Godfrey, and even, Harvey. The film? Cluny Brown.

 

Would you like to discuss it a little?

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Oh, wow you watched a Lubie and LIKED it??? Cool! I never know how people are going to react to Cluny Brown, it's such a quirky little thing.

 

The Harvey connection is out of left field but I think you've got something there. It certainly resembles it in the whole idea of being true to who you are, even if it's "odd" to everyone else.

 

I wish my DVD was Region 1, because I'd post caps. I have a few. What did you like best about the film?

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Oh, wow you watched a Lubie and LIKED it??? Cool! I never know how people are going to react to Cluny Brown, it's such a quirky little thing.

 

After I watched it, I came away kind of liking it, but I already feel myself liking the movie, more and more and more. That's the EXACT same feeling I had after watching The Shop Around the Corner, which is now in my top 100. It's a very cute film with a beautiful message.

 

The Harvey connection is out of left field but I think you've got something there. It certainly resembles it in the whole idea of being true to who you are, even if it's "odd" to everyone else.

 

That's part of why I felt some Harvey with Cluny Brown. It's also because Belinski (Charles Boyer) seems to bring people together, ala Godfrey (William Powell). He's deceptive and manipulative, but in a very positive way. Belinski is very encouraging.

 

I wish my DVD was Region 1, because I'd post caps. I have a few.

 

:)

 

What did you like best about the film?

 

The sexual humor! :P

 

I loved the message of the film, about finding your place. Uncle Arn (Billy Bevan) was right, even though his reasons were off. I loved Belinski's attraction to Cluny, and vice versa. He was willing to let her find her own way... until the end.

 

I liked the scene where Belinski calls Wilson (Richard Haydn) a "freighter." He actually meant it as a negative, but Cluny liked the idea of his being a "freighter." And once Belinski heard that, he didn't knock it. If that's what Cluny wanted, that's what she wanted. Who was he to say differently?

 

Loved Belinski's childish door shutting at the pharmacy.

 

Jennifer Jones is darling. The scene where she embarrasses her future family and friends is my very favorite scene in the film. She's so happy to do what she does best, to be so helpful, and it ends up being the wrong thing to do. And to see the boy so happy to meet her was beautiful. He's thrilled to meet a girl like Cluny.

 

Loved her running after Belinski, at the end.

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> After I watched it, I came away kind of liking it, but I already feel myself liking the movie, more and more and more. That's the EXACT same feeling I had after watching The Shop Around the Corner, which is now in my top 100. It's a very cute film with a beautiful message.

>

 

It does linger with you long after, doesn't it? I find myself thinking about it without even trying. Seeing Jennifer's puzzled face when she does or says the "wrong" thing, or something Adam says, how unpredictable his reactions are.

 

> That's part of why I felt some Harvey with Cluny Brown. It's also because Belinski (Charles Boyer) seems to bring people together, ala Godfrey (William Powell). He's deceptive and manipulative, but in a very positive way. Belinski is very encouraging.

>

 

How do you think Adam brings people together? Oh, you mean Helen Walker and Peter Lawford? I love how Adam is with Helen, he's attracted and doesn't hide it. I think she is, too, but unlike Cluny, she doesn't give in to impulses too easily, I think. Besides, she just knows.

 

> The sexual humor! :P

>

 

Well, why doesn't that surprise me! There's plenty of it, too.

 

> I loved the message of the film, about finding your place. Uncle Arn (Billy Bevan) was right, even though his reasons were off. I loved Belinski's attraction to Cluny, and vice versa. He was willing to let her find her own way... until the end.

>

 

It's a remarkable coming together for a couple. He doesn't court her, as you say, he backs away but it comes right in the end. I like the scene on the train, very unconventional, but it's so touching to me. No more "general delivery", he has to get a house with pipes!

 

I love Boyer's whole bemused and watchful presence, yet he does stimulate things into action, as you say. I'm still figuring out his character, really. He's a professor and the young men think he's there to really stir things up politically, which doesn't turn out to be the case. His "revolutionary" ideas seem to be more subtle, as the movie brings out.

 

I like that the old man, Reginald Owen, comes to be so fond of Adam even though he hasn't a clue what he's really about. This is an example of what I mean by Lubitsch's gentle approach (though apparently some in the Brit community were offended by his depiction of them here). He shows Lord and Lady Carmel as snobs, but not monsters (at least not him)..and he shows the servants are often ten times snobbier than their employers. What a frosty performance by dear Sara Allgood! :D This part of the story reminded me, oddly enough, of Rebecca.

 

> I liked the scene where Belinski calls Wilson (Richard Haydn) a "freighter." He actually meant it as a negative, but Cluny liked the idea of his being a "freighter." And once Belinski heard that, he didn't knock it. If that's what Cluny wanted, that's what she wanted. Who was he to say differently?

>

 

I must have missed that part! I don't remember the "freighter" remark. Goodness, Haydn and his mother, what a set up. Yet I can totally understand what drew Cluny, not to Wilson himself, but his world.

 

> Loved Belinski's childish door shutting at the pharmacy.

>

 

ha! That's a very Lubitsch moment. Irritation is the best revenge on small minds!

 

> Jennifer Jones is darling. The scene where she embarrasses her future family and friends is my very favorite scene in the film. She's so happy to do what she does best, to be so helpful, and it ends up being the wrong thing to do. And to see the boy so happy to meet her was beautiful. He's thrilled to meet a girl like Cluny.

>

 

I know, I think Jennifer was perfect here. She really is "different" and doesn't have to act that. She's kind of like Irene Bullock. Loopy but lovable and always with the best motives at heart.

 

> Loved her running after Belinski, at the end.

 

Yes, that was also kind of like in My Man Godfrey.

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Ciao, Persian Cat -- It does linger with you long after, doesn't it?

 

Yes. You know, it's writing about it that makes me examine my feelings more. And when I started to write about it, just minutes ago, I started to realize I really like the film. Strange. It's a lovely film.

 

I find myself thinking about it without even trying. Seeing Jennifer's puzzled face when she does or says the "wrong" thing, or something Adam says, how unpredictable his reactions are.

 

Theirs is an interesting match. He's drawn to her purity, her honesty, her innocence. I'm not sure what she's drawn to. Probably his charm, his taking an interest in her, his supportive nature with her. You know, actually, it's that she can be herself with him. There's no pretense. She doesn't have to worry about offending him. He doesn't have one big rule book to abide by. She's free with Belinski. She can be naked, ala Pandora and the Flying Dutchman.

 

How do you think Adam brings people together? Oh, you mean Helen Walker and Peter Lawford?

 

Yes. They're like Dr. Sanderson (Charles Drake) and Miss Kelly (Peggy Dow) in Harvey. But just Belinski's presence stimulates and unites those around him, ala Elwood (James Stewart).

 

I love how Adam is with Helen, he's attracted and doesn't hide it. I think she is, too, but unlike Cluny, she doesn't give in to impulses too easily, I think. Besides, she just knows.

 

Their bedroom scene is priceless. I love her screams. Betty Cream (Helen Walker) is a wise gal when it comes to male advances, so she sees through Belinski, on that level. But on other levels, she's not as perceptive. Betty definitely reminded me of Cornelia (Gail Patrick) in My Man Godfrey.

 

It's a remarkable coming together for a couple. He doesn't court her, as you say, he backs away but it comes right in the end. I like the scene on the train, very unconventional, but it's so touching to me. No more "general delivery", he has to get a house with pipes!

 

Damn that nightingale!

 

I love Boyer's whole bemused and watchful presence, yet he does stimulate things into action, as you say. I'm still figuring out his character, really. He's a professor and the young men think he's there to really stir things up politically, which doesn't turn out to be the case. His "revolutionary" ideas seem to be more subtle, as the movie brings out.

 

Ala Elwood P. Dowd (James Stewart), he allows others to do the believing. Everyone else is thinking what they want of the situation and him.

 

I like that the old man, Reginald Owen, comes to be so fond of Adam even though he hasn't a clue what he's really about.

 

You find similar patriarchs in My Man Godfrey and Harvey.

 

This is an example of what I mean by Lubitsch's gentle approach (though apparently some in the Brit community were offended by his depiction of them here). He shows Lord and Lady Carmel as snobs, but not monsters (at least not him)..and he shows the servants are often ten times snobbier than their employers. What a frosty performance by dear Sara Allgood! This part of the story reminded me, oddly enough, of Rebecca.

 

:D I really liked Ames (Reginald Gardiner) and Mrs. Maile (Sara Allgood). They were, as you say, total snobs. YET, they found their place. They were happy and, in their own way, in love. As Belinski says early in the film: "Wherever you're happy, that's your place."

 

I liked the juxtaposition of Colonel Graham (C. Aubrey Smith) with "Sir" and "Lady" Carmel. Cluny speaks of how dogs ("Roddy," the Colonel's dog) help to bring people together. All classes of people have dogs.

 

I must have missed that part! I don't remember the "freighter" remark.

 

It's all about Cluny and her "ship coming in."

 

Goodness, Haydn and his mother, what a set up. Yet I can totally understand what drew Cluny, not to Wilson himself, but his world.

 

I certainly thought of you after Cluny spoke of Wilson and his mother. Una O'Connor had to love her role as "Mrs. Wilson." She speaks only through clearing her throat. That's awesome!

 

Irritation is the best revenge on small minds!

 

Wonderfully said!

 

I know, I think Jennifer was perfect here. She really is "different" and doesn't have to act that. She's kind of like Irene Bullock. Loopy but lovable and always with the best motives at heart.

 

Yes, she's rather similar to Irene Bullock (Carole Lombard in My Man Godfrey), in that regard.

 

I love Jennifer's way. She exudes childlike innocence. She always seems "otherworldly."

 

Loved her running after Belinski, at the end.

 

Yes, that was also kind of like in My Man Godfrey.

 

Very much so!

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>

> Yes. You know, it's writing about it that makes me examine my feelings more. And when I started to write about it, just minutes ago, I started to realize I really like the film. Strange. It's a lovely film.

>

 

I think Lubitsch is so good at filling his best movies with so much nuance, that you can't quite forget them. He's a very intelligent director who never played down to his audience, yet he makes everything he tries to say so very entertaining that you accept it's illogic. I mean they may seem illogical, some of his situations and ideas, but they manage to come out seeming more sane and reasonable than the stuffy real world he mocks.

 

> Theirs is an interesting match. He's drawn to her purity, her honesty, her innocence. I'm not sure what she's drawn to. Probably his charm, his taking an interest in her, his supportive nature with her. You know, actually, it's that she can be herself with him. There's no pretense. She doesn't have to worry about offending him. He doesn't have one big rule book to abide by. She's free with Belinski. She can be naked, ala Pandora and the Flying Dutchman.

>

 

I think you have it, there. He's accepting and he affirms her rather than contradicts or constricts her, like Wilson and just about everyone else did.

 

> Yes. They're like Dr. Sanderson (Charles Drake) and Miss Kelly (Peggy Dow) in Harvey. But just Belinski's presence stimulates and unites those around him, ala Elwood (James Stewart).

>

 

Yes, he is a catalyst. So they think he's a revolutionary, then Lubitsch seems to contradict that with his practical, low key manner and then in the end, he is causing revolution of sorts!

 

> Their bedroom scene is priceless. I love her screams. Betty Cream (Helen Walker) is a wise gal when it comes to male advances, so she sees through Belinski, on that level. But on other levels, she's not as perceptive. Betty definitely reminded me of Cornelia (Gail Patrick) in My Man Godfrey.

>

 

This is exactly the kind of scene Lubitsch does best. Wonderful dialogue that can seem to be about something entirely other than what the words are saying. That's why their delivery is so important, you need actors who understand the nuance, like they do in this. Wonderful.

 

> Damn that nightingale!

>

 

Ha haaa! And it's practically the symbol of English poetry and romance....something in itself Lubitsch would of course find ripe for his satire. He loved to poke holes in stuffy, stratified worlds (but gently and never with the idea that living well was a bad thing!).

 

>

> Ala Elwood P. Dowd (James Stewart), he allows others to do the believing. Everyone else is thinking what they want of the situation and him.

>

 

You said it in a nutshell, Squirrely!

 

> You find similar patriarchs in My Man Godfrey and Harvey.

>

 

That's true, too! I hadn't thought about it, but Mr Chumley and Mr Bullock are very similar.

 

>

> :D I really liked Ames (Reginald Gardiner) and Mrs. Maile (Sara Allgood). They were, as you say, total snobs. YET, they found their place. They were happy and, in their own way, in love. As Belinski says early in the film: "Wherever you're happy, that's your place."

>

 

Oh, he makes it sound so simple. And it is. Or should be.

 

> I liked the juxtaposition of Colonel Graham (C. Aubrey Smith) with "Sir" and "Lady" Carmel. Cluny speaks of how dogs ("Roddy," the Colonel's dog) help to bring people together. All classes of people have dogs.

>

 

Oh yes, I thought that was another funny little thing about the movie. I hadn't considered it that way, though. You may be right...

 

> I must have missed that part! I don't remember the "freighter" remark.

>

> It's all about Cluny and her "ship coming in."

>

 

Ha! Oh, dear, then I think Wilson is more of a tugboat.

 

>

> I certainly thought of you after Cluny spoke of Wilson and his mother. Una O'Connor had to love her role as "Mrs. Wilson." She speaks only through clearing her throat. That's awesome!

>

 

She's hilarious! She's so mummified at this point she's lost the power of speech, good grief. That's what Cluny was headed for.

 

>

> I love Jennifer's way. She exudes childlike innocence. She always seems "otherworldly."

>

 

She really does, which is why she's so right for the role. I cannot think of anyone else in it. She convinces you that she believes what she says and that those pipes give her a thrill---and makes us in the audience want her to have them! And the silk stockings. Lubitsch will give a woman pipes but he will also make sure she has the proper lingerie. :D

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Good morning, Miss Whosits -- I think Lubitsch is so good at filling his best movies with so much nuance, that you can't quite forget them. He's a very intelligent director who never played down to his audience, yet he makes everything he tries to say so very entertaining that you accept it's illogic. I mean they may seem illogical, some of his situations and ideas, but they manage to come out seeming more sane and reasonable than the stuffy real world he mocks.

 

I've only seen two Lubitsch films, thus far, and what you say rings true with me. Lubitsch seems to be about "appearances."

 

I think you have it, there. He's accepting and he affirms her rather than contradicts or constricts her, like Wilson and just about everyone else did.

 

That's very nicely said. I like your usage of the word "affirms." I believe that's important to woman.

 

Yes, he is a catalyst. So they think he's a revolutionary, then Lubitsch seems to contradict that with his practical, low key manner and then in the end, he is causing revolution of sorts!

 

Precisely! Belinski is certainly a "revolutionary," just as Elwood and Godfrey are. They are outside of Society, in their own ways.

 

This is exactly the kind of scene Lubitsch does best. Wonderful dialogue that can seem to be about something entirely other than what the words are saying. That's why their delivery is so important, you need actors who understand the nuance, like they do in this. Wonderful.

 

Very true. Boyer crackles. He's so very smooth and convincing. And I love Helen Walker's little screams.

 

Ha haaa! And it's practically the symbol of English poetry and romance....something in itself Lubitsch would of course find ripe for his satire. He loved to poke holes in stuffy, stratified worlds (but gently and never with the idea that living well was a bad thing!).

 

It's not the living well, it's, well, the living. It's the dead seriousness of living life. And it's done with supreme selfishness. If a person doesn't fit the exact little hole or box you wish to place them in, it's their fault, not your own.

 

Ha! Oh, dear, then I think Wilson is more of a tugboat.

 

He's a freighter in the bay!

 

She's hilarious! She's so mummified at this point she's lost the power of speech, good grief. That's what Cluny was headed for.

 

I took it as if their world is such a shut-in world, a world of great seclusion and separation. All she needed to communicate was to clear her throat a certain way and her son and friends would understand her... but no one else. Sir and Lady Carmel communicate this way, as do the butler and maid. They then mock those who are unlike them as being "foolish." It's all about making onself better than the rest.

 

She really does, which is why she's so right for the role. I cannot think of anyone else in it. She convinces you that she believes what she says and that those pipes give her a thrill---and makes us in the audience want her to have them! And the silk stockings. Lubitsch will give a woman pipes but he will also make sure she has the proper lingerie.

 

You and your "proper"! I like Cluny's entrance: "Good afternoon. Well, should we have a go at it?"

 

Nice girl. Sits a horse well. :D

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That's amazing! MissG - your comparison of Una O'Connor with what Cluny's life will be.... c'est magnifique! Stifled.

 

And Frank- I love your descriptions of Belinski - he simply IS, while others try to fill in the blanks surrounding him. HE never does. He's quite the mystery, and remains one. I love this side of Boyer, so wry, so open - stating things that should be obvious, but aren't when you are in the midst of confusing life. Where he came from, what he does for a living, THAT is mysterious, but HE is not. It makes me wonder if his reputation as a freedom fighter or whatever it was was an accident, or if he is just too modest to take credit for his accomplishments.... maybe I just missed something?

 

I just watched a very Cluny-esque moment from *The Happy Time* - Boyer, convinced he can understand what birds are saying, frees his son's pet bird, only to have the bird fly out the window. It's a beautiful moment. The bird eventually comes back, and who wouldn't, for a chance to live with a man who would want you to be totally free? :x

 

I see the reference to Gail Patrick's Cornelia, and I get it, but Betty Cream has none of Cornelia's vindictive nature. Betty has been bred for one thing and one thing only - she knows men. She is trying to have a little fun while she can, before being sold into marriage. Adam helps her realize who she really is and where she fits. It's an amazingly subtle and wry performance by Helen Walker. In some ways, she is the match of Belinski, moreso than Cluny.

 

Cluny is a character I am still trying to work around in my mind. I definitely need a second viewing.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Oh boy oh boy. Seems like I've been sitting on my "CLUNY BROWN" dvd for much too long now. Well, it's a dreary rainy Tuesday here in NYC. Guess I'll have at it now.

 

Yay! You love Jennifer and Helen Walker, so I'm sure you will enjoy it, CinemAva.

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