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Can I digress for one minute? Did anyone watch *Rendezvous* this morning? I felt bad for poor Roz, stuck with another silly role, but William Powell was positively swoon-inducing in this one. Maybe it was the uniform, or maybe it was the way he said, "Wait for me, think of me, love me." at the end....

 

h2. sigh

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Oh I like Rendezvous and I love Roz's character. She's so loose and kind of screwy.

 

I like this movie much better than Star of Midnight or The Ex Mrs Bradford, two films I think of along with Rendezvous as group for some reason. And, of course, I forgot to record it. :(

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I didn't record either, because I used up all my space for *Judgment at Nuremberg.*

 

I can totally see how those movies would go togerther in your head... I was a wee bit disappointed in the *Ex Mrs. Bradford*, and I haven't seen the other.

 

I'm glad you liked Roz, because I did end up liking her a lot, despite the silly dialog she got. I thought the movie had the right blend of comedy, drama, romance and suspense.

 

But for me it was Powell's movie, and I just adored him... I like him in these semi-romantic, almost Edwardian roles. There is something old fashioned, maybe European, and yet still briskly 1930's American in his delivery.... I just love him as a WWI soldier, he really fit the role so well, and he looked KILLER in knee high boots.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 11, 2010 8:06 PM

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I agree, Powell is very dashing and romantic and he does have a Continental flair. He and Bob Montgomery could get away with roles that were Anglo-European somehow, in spite of their accents. It's their delivery and panache, I think. Something of grace peculiar to men who grew up in the "Jazz Age", I speculate.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> I agree, Powell is very dashing and romantic and he does have a Continental flair. He and Bob Montgomery could get away with roles that were Anglo-European somehow, in spite of their accents. It's their delivery and panache, I think. Something of grace peculiar to men who grew up in the "Jazz Age", I speculate.

 

That's it - "jazz age grace".

 

So many actors of the late twenties didn't make it into talkies, they somehow went wrong in the depression age, coming off as bland or effeminate once they spoke. Powell and Montgomery added punch and energy to the movies they were in. I think they both had drive, but hid it under a terribly relaxed demeanor. They were fizzy and bright, but each had grit and quite serious depth under the skin. Both seemed ultra-SMART, so quick witted, and had an uncanny way of knowing what was going to happen without actually telegraphing the end of the movie. And in their prime, they added strongly masculine traits to the mix as well. Oh, heck, they were both just cool as all get out. They made jazz age recklessness seem modern and sophisticated to thirties audiences.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 11, 2010 9:50 PM

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Guyz, please don?t make me tear up my ?INDEPENDENT-WOMAN? card just b?cuz I love "THAT TOUCH OF MINK.? (1962) With Cary Grant and Doris Day in it...I just can?t resist.

 

I loved the frothy milkshake comedy in this film. It?s fraught with double-entendres and mistaken identities. I love Audrey Meadows to pieces in "...Mink." Her line deliveries are strictly from the "Eve Arden Playbook of Sarcasm." Her sharp tongue is perfect. I love the tinkly music that under-

scores and foretells everything; liked the split screen phone conversation. I like how characters talk at cross-purposes: (Cary's looking at a view/Doris is looking at the bed). Gig Young plays a soused-up business associate all loosey-goosey. He's funny as he rails against the generosity

of Cary Grant's businessman. Gig's psychiatrist steps out of his session with Gig (to put in a stock tip from him) and returns thinking that Gig is gay. That leads to amusing set-pieces and Gig really does a fine job as the comic foil. At one point, when visiting Doris' apartment, he is mistaken for Cary Grant's character and is smacked down the stairs by Meadows. The landlady also smacks him. He runs out of the building when yet another lady sics her dog on Gig. He jumps into a cab...and when the dog jumped in through the window...wow! John Astin is good as the smarmy wolf on the make for Doris. Eeeew, he's creepy too. I love it when he runs after his truck (Cary

has car-jacked it) but has to quickly leap out of the way of an oncoming taxi. I crack up. "Muscatel. For my lady's pleasure," says Astin, proposing to liquor up Doris b'4 they even get to the hotel.

 

* ?For every unwed mother, there?s an unwed father.?

 

Cary donates money to a Home for Unwed Mothers and Doris is ushered in by Gig Young to give him a piece of his mind. The ladies of the Home mistakenly thinks Doris is pregnant by Cary:

 

* "When a man donates two hundred thousand dollars, he?s entitled to use the facilities.?

 

When Doris faces Cary to give him a piece of her mind for splashing mud on her clothes, seeing him for the first time she falls in love (the music tells us so) but we don?t need that to tell us. It?s Cary Grant and he looks so mature and dashing with his greying hair, cleft chin, and tanned, toned body. I?m in love with him as I write this. At thirty-seven, I know Doris might be considered slightly long in the tooth to be virginal, starry-eyed and romantic. But heck, it?s Doris Day. I forgive her anything.

 

When Doris lets Audrey know that Cary has taken her sullied clothes to get cleaned, Audrey?s very lethally protective:

 

"What floor are you on? (To co-worker:) Connie, get the cleaver!?

 

Some lines that tickled me:

 

* ?A man?s conscience is in direct opposition to his best interest.?

 

Audrey wants to spray a little color to highlight her hair. She picks up a spray can with dark hair coloring:

 

* ?Raven. That wasn?t bad. I got whistled at by a bird.? (Maybe it's not what she says but the way she says it that just kills me.

 

* "No matter what calamity befalls your fellow man, you can always laugh about it,?[/i] says Cary to Gig.

 

I love the topsy turvey dialogue:

 

* ?He?s so low, when they bury him, they?re going to have to dig up.?

 

Doris is wined and dined by the dashing businessman. She accompanies him to a big business deal and even watches as he speaks at the U.N. He offers to take her on a whirlwind tour, withOUT benefit of marriage. Now girls, I ask you...you?re going to quibble about a marriage proposal and turn down a whirlwind of a time with Cary Grant?? Only in the movies, folks. I love the zippy music and the fashions from NYC?s Bergdorf Goodman. (Bergdorf is still there folks, right on the corner of 57th Street). No one epitomized 1960?s fashion like Doris Day and Audrey Hepburn. Yeah, it?s sexist, non-feminist, girlie girlie girl stuff, with models showing off the latest in 1960?s fashion for Doris? hedonistic trousseau. Yeah, it?s pure fantasy and dreamy cotton candy fare. What?s the matter with that?

 

Cary invites Doris to Bermuda, and Audrey?s pretty steamed about it ?cuz Doris is not that kind of a girl:

 

* ?Kruschev spoke at the United Nations. Would I let you go to Bermuda with Kruschev?!?

 

My absolute favorite line in this movie (and one of my favorite lines in comedy) is Audrey Meadows terse, caustic delivery as she admonishes Doris:

 

* ?For two thousand years, we?ve had their children, washed their clothes and cleaned their houses. And what did we get in return? The right to smoke in public.?

 

Bermuda is disastrous for Cary?s romantic intentions. Doris? guilt manifests itself by seeing her and Cary in a bed in every situation they?re in in the Carribbean. ("They know.") Cute sight gag. Doris breaks out in a rash when faced with The Moment of sleeping with Cary Grant. (The only woman in cinema history to have a reaction like that!) The doctor that tends to her plays it soooo straight and winds up being funny when he says:

 

* ?We give them one semester of home economics and expect them to be Madame DuBarry.?

 

The scene where Cary mistakenly goes in the hotel room to retrieve Doris is a real hoot. His take when he exits the bedroom is hilarious. It's 1962, a good thirty...THIRTY years later in Cary Grant's career and he still has the timing, the comic touch. I almost didn't watch this movie this time. I've seen it so often. But as I had it on and got into it...I'm really glad I did. If you've never seen "That Touch of Mink" do yourself a favor and check it out. You'll get some laughs.

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I watched Roz and my main man Jack Carson in *Roughly Speaking* last night. It had been a long time since I last saw it. It's a biography of Louise Randall Pierson, who I only know because I just watched the movie.

 

Roz goes from childhood wealth to poverty and back and forth again. It's a good role for her. It has more depth than her standard working women roles of the time. It's more drama than comedy. Carson shows up about 50 minutes in and refreshes both Roz and the film.

 

They don't really seem suited for each other but it works pretty well. I wouldn't call it a great movie but it held my interest after I got through the first 15 minutes. It goes through WWI, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression and into WWII. It just sort of ends there. I wanted the to know the rest of Pierson's story and felt like I was left hanging after spending nearly two hours with her.

 

*That's it - "jazz age grace"*

 

That's a good term. I was trying to think of others who fit that bill and were successful into the thirties, like Powell and Montgomery, maybe Douglas Fairbanks Jr., or how about Franchot Tone (who I think you all hate), I'm not sure. Powell was mainly a villain in the silent era.

 

There is also the case of Fred Astaire, who had a very difficult task in transcending his ethereal qualities to make a workable male lead for his films.

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Hey how did you sneak that post in there? :)

 

Didn't mean to step on your topic.

 

I don't hold *That Touch of Mink* in the same regard as I do some of Doris' other work, particularly with Hudson, even though I really do want the pairing to work.

 

However once again, your review is so darn entertaining, that I may have to give it yet another viewing!

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MadHat, I got no topic. I'm just musing around on a late Sunday evening. I hope I'm not stepping on your conversation.

 

FrankGrimes, I love the screen cap you chose. There's a great sample of Cary giving a good comic take. (My favorite color is blue...and I want to dive into the blue that's behind Doris on the phone).

 

Molo I have to disagree with you when you write: "They don't really seem suited for each other but it works pretty well." I love Roz with Cary Grant. I love Roz with Gable. But I always thought her best leading man was big and burly Jack Carson. They've got the same easy breezy way with a quip and a line and each other.

 

And if my words can make you give any film, another look-see...I can't ask for anything more.

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I don't hate Franchot Tone! He isn't my favorite, but I like him. He does look like a scared turtle, though. :)

 

Doug Jr. is a good pick. I like him very much as well. There is something about these three, Montgomery, Powell and Fairbanks, Jr. that makes you wonder what they will do next.... a sort of surprise element that keeps them interesting.

 

I liked *Roughly Speaking* a lot, but especially when Carson comes into the picture...he is so sorely needed after all the sturm and drang of Roz's early life..... and he just breezes in and takes over. It's a lovely relationship, with him showing her how to trust again.

 

And *That Touch of Mink*? Everybody likes it. They are just embarrassed to admit it! It's a hoot and you described it to a T, Maven. :) :) :) :)

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 12, 2010 1:01 AM

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*Molo I have to disagree with you when you write: "They don't really seem suited for each other but it works pretty well." I love Roz with Cary Grant. I love Roz with Gable. But I always thought her best leading man was big and burly Jack Carson. They've got the same easy breezy way with a quip and a line and each other.*

 

You do have a point there. I think maybe they looked odd together at first. Carson is so vital and Roz is a bit beaten down. Maybe it's just that Roz looked odd at that point in the film. I don't know. It just was something that struck me at first, but as the film went on, I really liked them together. Roz is reinvigorated by Carson's presence in her life. You are right about how their styles compliment each other.

 

I have *That Touch of Mink* on dvd. I may give it a look tonight.

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*I don't hate Franchot Tone! He isn't my favorite, but I like him. He does look like a scared turtle, though.*

 

Ha! I think that "scared turtle" thing is what I was remembering. I stand corrected. :)

 

*I liked Roughly Speaking a lot, but especially when Carson comes into the picture...he is so sorely needed after all the sturm and drang of Roz's early life..... and he just breezes in and takes over. It's a lovely relationship, with him showing her how to trust again.*

 

I agree. This may be Carson's most kindhearted performance.

 

*And That Touch of Mink? Everybody likes it. They are just embarrassed to admit it! It's a hoot and you described it to a T, Maven.*

 

I like it well enough, I just didn't think it was as good as I wanted it to be. I had high expectations for Grant and Day. When reading CineMaven's review, I found myself laughing at the scenes she was describing. So I definitely need to take another look. I was probably too hasty. :)

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"I have That Touch of Mink on dvd. I may give it a look tonight....I like it well enough, I just didn't think it was as good as I wanted it to be. I had high expectations for Grant and Day. When reading CineMaven's review, I found myself laughing at the scenes she was describing. So I definitely need to take another look. I was probably too hasty."

 

Ooooooh Molo! When you do get a chance to check it out, will you come back and tell me wha'cha think? Your opinion just might not change. And that's okay. I still want to read what you think. Thanks!

 

In any event, you won't be able to deny that Audrey Meadows' pungency is an antidote to the dreamy, starry-eyed, thrill of it all, fantasy, romance of it.

 

P.S. ...And please pay attention to:

 

* The dog jumping INTO the cab after Gig Young...

* Cary Grant coming OUT of the room after seeing John Fielder's wife...

* John Astin CHASING his truck in Asbury Park...

* And every SINGLE line reading that Audrey Meadows gives...

 

Enjoy. I hope...

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THAT TOUCH OF MINK is unequivocably one of my favorite comedies of the period. I love

Audrey Meadows' comments and my favorite line may just be Doris', after she got through

making her "date" with John Astin:

 

"Snake! When he smiles, he rattles!"

 

When I first watched it I could not stop laughing at that.

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Okay. I think I will just settle on watching *That Touch of Mink* tonight. Last night's movie watching confusion convinced me that I really need to carefully plan these things out.

 

I was all set to watch Sturges' *Unfaithfully Yours* but for some reason I had the title confused with Mervyn LeRoy's *Without Reservations*. Once I saw Wayne and Colbert in the opening credits, I figured out my mistake. (I'm really sharp that way) I started frantically looking for *Unfaithfully Yours* but couldn't find it. Turns out I probably don't even have it!

 

By the time I gave up the search, it was getting so late I had to find a shorter film to watch. I made a snap decision and ended up with the East Side Kids in *Flying Wild* !!

 

This is all sadly reminiscent of a few weeks ago, when I clicked on *The Nun's Story* expecting to see Debbie Reynolds strumming a guitar, only this time it was even worse! How do you mix up *Unfaithfully Yours* and *Without Reservations* ???

 

Anyway don't worry! I'm fine.

 

Really! :D

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I do that too!

 

I need to watch *Unfaithfully Yours* sometime too, I saw part of it long ago and hated it. Now I know it's Preston Sturges, I need to give it another try.

 

I always have a plan of what I am going to watch next, but then, by the time I get hold of the TV, I don't feel like it anymore, or it's too late to watch what I wanted, so I check out my Netflix films, then move on to the dvr, then if I can't find anything on the hard drive, I look through my discs, and finally settle on something just in time to fall asleep.

 

The story of my life.

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> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> I'll meet you at "The Home"! :D

>

> How about Chumley's Rest?

>

> Don't FORGET to bring your dvd collection!

 

Just as long as it's not Happy Dale. I don't think I could take "Teddy's" bugle blowing.

 

I'll tie a string to my finger to remind me about the dvds. Let's hope I don't forget

what the string's for.

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