Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Can we skip 34th Street and go straight to Serendipity's?? Congrats again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not even a quick glance in front of the Empire State Building to see the outline of Kong's body in the cement? But I do agree -- when chocolate is calling, I'm already there. And thank you again!

 

Did you see ROSEANNA McCOY? I loved the beautiful Frank Loesser theme song for Roseanna, and the Lee Garmes photography was hauntingly evocative. I was startled to see matron Evelyn Harper as a Hatfield wife. I became inexplicably attracted to Ray Massey as Roseanna's protective father, especially his twangy accent, which seemed to become more pronounced with each scene. Farley was rough-hewn yet sensitive, and the "outsider" aspect of the part suited him.

 

Hard to believe Joan Evans was 14 years old -- she looked pretty mature. And then there's a young Richard Basehart as a hillbilly psycho!

 

Joan Evans with Hope Emerson:

 

0034.jpg

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Apr 19, 2010 2:32 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

What did everybody think of SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL? I was pleasantly surprised. I mean, I thought it was going to be pretty crass and ring-a-ding-dingy, but it actually had a kind of loopy charm, and the farcial highway finale was worthy of Blake Edwards. Lauren Bacall's temper was very funny, and I loved seeing Henry Fonda channel his deftly amusing Preston Sturges comic romantic persona. Such a refreshing change from all those serious, message-minded Presidential-type parts he was playing at the time. Tony already had his cynical city-boy hustler character iconically imprinted with the audience, so that role was a day in the park for him, and I liked the way he "eased" Natalie into her good-natured, cute performance. And Fran Jeffries hip rendition of "The Anniversary Waltz" (with Lauren and Henry dancing the Twist to it, lol) is reason enough to watch!

Link to post
Share on other sites

?Oh, Sweet Tea, how adorable! Thanks so much -- you're definitely ALL angel. But yes, only cider, young lady. I don't want you floating around in Joseph Cotten's bedroom.?

 

Uhmmmmm...and that would be a bad thing??? Wait!!! Joseph Cotten in ?Love Letters? or Joseph Cotten in ?Shadow of a Doubt???? Joseph Cotten in "Duel in the Sun" or Joseph Cotten in "Niagara"??? It depends on which Cotten she cottons to.

 

?Not even a quick glance in front of the Empire State Building to see the outline of Kong's body in the cement? ...?

 

Naaaaaah. Straight to the ice cream parlor...but on 2nd thought, we would work up an appetitie if we went shopping.

 

No Bronxie, I didn?t watch ?Roseanna McCoy.? Hillbilly settings and log cabins never attract my attention. (Can't do "Drums Along the Mohawk" or the first part of "Sgt. York" etc.). If I ever catch ?Tobacco Road? it?d just be for Gene. I also didn?t see ?Sex and the Single Girl? but I love those sexy, sixties, silly, sex farces. OOoohhh, Fran Jeffries again, huh? Maybe I can catch up on things when I?m back in New York.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> What did everybody think of SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL? I was pleasantly surprised. I mean, I thought it was going to be pretty crass and ring-a-ding-dingy, but it actually had a kind of loopy charm, and the farcial highway finale was worthy of Blake Edwards. Lauren Bacall's temper was very funny, and I loved seeing Henry Fonda channel his deftly amusing Preston Sturges comic romantic persona. Such a refreshing change from all those serious, message-minded Presidential-type parts he was playing at the time. Tony already had his cynical city-boy hustler character iconically imprinted with the audience, so that role was a day in the park for him, and I liked the way he "eased" Natalie into her good-natured, cute performance. And Fran Jeffries hip rendition of "The Anniversary Waltz" (with Lauren and Henry dancing the Twist to it, lol) is reason enough to watch!

 

I've seen it about two times before, and the first time I hated it (mostly because of Tony) and the second time I started to like it because of Nat and her STUNNING WARDROBE. Honestly, she has some of the most gorgeous outfits and gowns of her whole career in this movie and proves that a tiny woman can knock those 7 foot stick insects out of the water.

 

I just love Nat as a comedienne....I feel it was a relatively untapped talent, she only seemed to do a few comedies. Love her as Penelope, a really DUMB comedy but I can't help it, it's my cuppa tea. She was a "screwball" with the best of them (Carole, Myrna, etc) at a time that kind of comedy was already on the wane.

 

I also found Lauren's temperamental outbursts very funny.

 

Like the Maven, I enjoy these "fluffies" from the sixties. Especially the clothes....oh, the clothes!!!

 

NatinSTSG.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed Roseanna McCoy, pretty much for the same reason Maven did.... I really hate those backwoods stories... Hope Emerson though.... hmmm. It takes someone special to make me break out of my irrational prejudice against hillbilly stories.

 

Sex and the SIngle Girl is remarkably good for what it is... I haven't seen it for years, but I was always surprised by it. And the clothes.... absolutely!

 

Nat was really good at comedy. My first experience with that was in The Great Race, although her character is a bit dated now, I still enjoy her so much in it.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 19, 2010 9:51 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> That is not fair having such a great picture this early in the morning. Although, it did get my heart started.

 

Did you like those little bare feet, hmmm movieman? :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> Bronxie,

>

> Congrats on your latest 12,000 milestone! Three years ago when you joined us, did you have any idea that you would end up liking this place so much? We are all grateful you did because I can't imagine TCM City without you or Mom.

>

> Congrats again! Hope Rod Taylor and Keith Larsen fight over giving you a congratulatory kiss!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks, my friend! I originally saw your congrats in Hot Topics, and answered you there.

 

I'm a TCM addict, no doout about it, and have passed along this mad love to my mother.

 

Rod and Keith will have to stand in line behind Ray Massey from ROSEANNA McCOY.

 

Don't ask me why.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just took 100 screencaps from MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW and almost ruined my keyboard I was sobbing so much. I have never, ever seen such a sad movie. Peter B. in the interview on the disc quoted Orson: "OH my God! That is the SADDEST movie ever made!"

 

He was right. I can't even bear thinking about it. Nothing is as sad. Because it's so true and it hits home. That McCarey got away with ending it like he did is a testament to the kind of power he had at Paramount at that time. No other movie ends so sadly. Peter called it a "foreign movie, something you expect out of Europe, not America." And it's more applicable now than back then.

 

Has anyone else seen this movie (recently released by Criterion on a beautiful DVD)?

 

vlcsnap-00101.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there, Miss G. I went searching to find out more about the story.. because I love a good cry now and then. After reading your comments, I did a little "googling" and I am glad to say I was able to not only find out more about it, but I also managed to find the film too. (its' a youtube) So I will stock up on more Kleenex and will look forward to a good sob (ONE of these days, I hope.) I have had sucha rotten schedule lately, I have NO idea when I will get to watch it, but it is definitely on my list now (along w/ The 39 Steps and one other recent youtube find I have saved (but who's name escapes me at the moment.. ha.) SOMEDAY I hope to have my own private little youtube film festival. Someday...

 

PS.. what little I saw from the youtube... I bet the screencaps were lovely... it has a really "rich" look to the black and white.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, Ro, I hope you do get to watch but I warn you, you will need about 20 boxes of Kleenex, not just one. I never cried so much over a movie since The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. It may even be sadder than that one, if that's possible. Unlike TMWSLV, it's a story that is still happening and anyone can relate.

 

I hope the YouTube print is from the one on the Criterion disc because it's quite nice.

 

vlcsnap-00087.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh girlie.. you got me so hooked I ended up watching the first two parts.. I can already see where this is leading w/ the kids... OH me, it is getting my dander up... I want to give them all a swift kick to knock some sense into them.... but it is also breaking my heart watching it all play out..

 

Now I have to figure out how in the world I am going to find time to watch the rest of it. (snifff)

Link to post
Share on other sites

OH Miss G... Poignant is the right word.

 

So.. ok... NOTHING I had intended to do around the house tonight (to catch up on my chores..ha) got FINISHED (or even really started.. I am so irresponsible sometimes, ha.) But OH me, oh my.. I had to come back and watch a little more.. and then I watched a little more.. and then by then I was up to part 8 out of 10 and I said... OH for pity's sake.. only 15 or 16 more minutes and I'll be done.. so I stuck with it...

 

Wow.

 

I THOUGHT I was doing ok handling the emotions too... because I actually made it almost all the way through w/ mostly dry eyes. It was heartbreaking in places.. but I guess I just was too tired to cry.. ha... because the only time I really got too teary was when the shop keeper friend called his wife into the room to just look at her.. to make sure she was still there. (sob) That sort of got to me.

 

But I recovered... and kept watching.. and it was painful and emotional... and even humorous in places... but still I am thinking how MAD I was at those kids and their spouses.... so maybe that is what kept my eyes more or less from clouding up.

 

And then they went for that doggone car ride to that hotel.. and that bandleader had to play THAT song (it has some very emotional ties for me... reminding me of elderly loved ones long since past.. so that alone got me teary eyed) BUT if that wasn't enough... then they had to sing it to each other in the car on the way to the train station.. OH for pity's sake... I am an emotional wreck now. (but I mean that in a good way)

 

Thank you Miss G for pointing this film out to me. And I have to say I still have a sink full of dirty dishes and NO dusting or vacuming was done tonight... and as a result... it may be a day or two now before I have time to get to at least those two chores....

 

But oh me.... watta story. (pass me another tissue if you please)

 

PS Jackie.. hope you get a chance to catch the whole thing sometime... but wait until you get over your "Westward the Women" tears.. :-)

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Apr 21, 2010 11:49 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Peacemaker,

I hope to reply to your post tonight...I feel the same about those kids. I don't see how

it would have made that much difference to care for the two of them as it was with just

one. I was truly horrified. It was like the days of slavery when they'd sell off one spouse

to one buyer and the other to another buyer. Horrendous. And that children should

do this to their parents because they don't want the "inconvenience" is just sad.

 

Interestingly, the director is not altogether condemnatory with the kids, He does

not paint them as total monsters, not even Cora who I really wanted to slap to

kingdom come. He's just putting out there for us to think about and form our

own judgements about a situation that was getting critical back then (Social Security

payments would not go out for another few years, so lots of retirees and low income

elderly were facing this situation presented in the movie). Also, McCarey made

the movie shortly after his father died, partly as a tribute to him (he was really tight

with both his parents).

 

A remarkable film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there little gal...

 

Just taking a moment between the dusting and vacumming.. (ha) to say that you are so right when you said:

 

And that children should do this to their parents because they don't want the "inconvenience" is just sad.

 

You have said it right. Sad, and almost criminal in a way. To take these two loving parents and treat them as if they were not just "burdens of inconvenience" but really less than "second class citizens" OH it really was heartbreaking to see it all play out.

 

Not to sound in anyway like some sort of authority on the subject, I do have some experience in working (and being around) older folks. And I have spent a lot of time w/ seniors through my own family as well as church and work settings too. Some older folks have very supportive families who are an active and vital part of their lives. And then there are those who do not give them the time of day, let alone help provide for their needs (physical, emotional, or spiritual) And you can really tell the difference in th quality of life many of them lead. (and I am not just talking about "physical" quality although that certainly has a lot to do with it too).

 

One example really stands out in my mind a lot. There were these two little widow ladies (who are both long since gone) that used to attend our church many years ago. And they are a perfect example of what I am saying. My husband and I spent a lot of time driving the church van picking these two treasures (and a few others) up for Sunday AM and evening (and also Wednesday night) services and we got to know these gals very well.

 

One lady had three sons (all married) who always had at least ONE member of the family stopping by daily to check in on her, fix stuff around the house, help her w/ her shopping, take her to her doctor appointments, see to her daily needs (and they were many... she was quite elderly, very frail, and about 90% blind) She always talked about the latest things going on in her son's (and grandchildren's lives) and she was alert and vivacious right up to the very end of her life.

 

The other lady.. had NO visits for years on end from either of her two sons. And only one of the two sons even bothered to call her perhaps as rarely as once ever three or four months. The other boy, she was lucky if she heard from him more than once or twice a year. She had one grandaughter who would call her maybe once every couple of months to say hi.And she would always come to church beaming after she got one of those rare phone calls.. or if one of them managed to remember to send her a birthday or mothers day card. I think one son came to visit her one time for three or four days out of all those years we knew here.. and I am talking at least 9 years.

 

She had a lot of personal needs that she usually kept to herelf (until they became emergencies) and then folks from church tried to step in to help, but it was always a challenge as she did not like anyone to know she was struggling. And her health was another thing she kept secret.. again I think due to some embarrassment. And despite the fact that we all were checking in with her at least two or three times a week for church functions, etc... and trying to stay on top of what she needed, by the time we all realized she was sick.. she had some very serious health issues that eventually took her life.

 

Spoiler alert:

Anyway.. what I am getting to is that I firmly believe that it was the families of these two women (and the security (or lack of it) from knowing whether or not they were loved by the ones they loved) that made the difference in their final years. And I think that is true in almost everyone. And in my mind, as the father was getting on that train... all I could think of was "Well.. I wonder which one will die first.. because neither one of them is going to last much longer without the other."

 

The scene where the mother interrupts the bridge games (with that room full of people) was so awkward to watch... and yet very telling. When she gets that phone call and is standing there trying to have a private conversation in the most PUBLIC place of all... did you see all the different expressions on all the various faces of those people. Some were embarrassed. They had NO clue how to deal with such open emotion on such a social level. Others were offended and you could clearly see how "low" they thought the whole situation was, likely judging their hostess as being less than "upper crust" for having such "homey" family members. Still others were "nostalgic" almost.. likely picturing their own mom and dad and how in love they were. And SOME... (thank goodness) were looking offended for a completely DIFFERENT reason.. you could see them going back and forth between expressions of compassion for the mother... and anger at the son and his wife. And you could tell they were judging their host and hostess for the POOR TREATMENT this dear gray haired lady was receiving. (or at least it looked that way to me)

 

Interestingly, the director is not altogether condemnatory with the kids, He does not paint them as total monsters

 

He's just putting out there for us to think about and form our own judgements

 

I think you are right and it can be seen in the scene I mentioned above. All the different people at that party and their facial expressions (to me) were like all the various attitudes most of our society seems to have even today toward how to deal w/ "mom and dad" as the years go by and time catches up with them all. How one feels about it all (again, to me) is very telling of their character and of who they really are as a person.

 

Now having said that... I MUST confess... sometimes.. you do reap what you sow. Some parents are so awful and upleasant (and even abusive) to the point that they should not be surprised to find themselves alone at the end of their lives.... but I do not think they are the "norm" of those who are left alone. I think most elderly folks who are neglected late in life are in that situation because their families have "moved on" and now mom and dad are "out of sight, out of mind" It is a tragedy to me to even think such a thing. (golly I am sounding kind of judgemental right now... who do I think I am???)

 

Cora who I really wanted to slap to kingdom come

 

Oh wow..you are SO right about Cora. but you know.. to me... although she put on a "public' face for others.... at least to her DAD she was pretty much the most honest of all those kids. NO false pretense of a show of kindness when it was just HIM. She really let him know what a burden she thought he was. OH MY GOLLY was she ever hateful. How DARE her parents.... the ones who gave her life and provided her every need, and loved her all of her days even think to impose themselves on her.. be it one at a time. WHO do they think they are interrupting her life that way. GOOD grief.... stand in line if you want to knock HER around, kid. I am way ahead of you.

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Apr 23, 2010 12:30 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

MAKE WAY FOR SPOILERS BELOW!!!

 

Hi Peacemaker! When are we going to take out Cora? :D

 

>

> I THOUGHT I was doing ok handling the emotions too... because I actually made it almost all the way through w/ mostly dry eyes. It was heartbreaking in places.. but I guess I just was too tired to cry.. ha... because the only time I really got too teary was when the shop keeper friend called his wife into the room to just look at her.. to make sure she was still there. (sob) That sort of got to me.

>

 

Maurice Moscovich was the kindly Jewish proprietor who saw so much more than he let on, and felt it all. I don't know much about him, but maybe he'd be an interesting candidate for JackFavell's wonderful character actor thread (found here: http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=152924&tstart=0&messageID=8393778#8393778 ). He did SOOOO much with that part, and the director was wise enough to exploit every second of his screen time. He is, in many ways, the "greek chorus" of the film, reflecting our own better nature and rather astonished reaction to the unfeeling ways of the younger generation to those they owe their very existence to.

 

vlcsnap-00087.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00088.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00089.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00090.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00091.jpg

 

When he reads Beulah Bondi's letter to Victor Moore (because Moore forgot his glasses and cannot read without them), he's so moved (as we are) and cannot finish the last lines because he feels they are too personal. He also believes Moore's whitewashing of his daughter Cora's "kindness" to him in taking him into her home, so the wonderment and later contempt on his face when he visits the bed sick Moore at her home is a welcome acknowledgement and witness to our own feelings about her behavior.

 

vlcsnap-00086.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00092.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00093.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00094.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00095.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00096.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00097.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00098.jpg

 

 

 

>

> And then they went for that doggone car ride to that hotel.. and that bandleader had to play THAT song (it has some very emotional ties for me... reminding me of elderly loved ones long since past.. so that alone got me teary eyed) BUT if that wasn't enough... then they had to sing it to each other in the car on the way to the train station.. OH for pity's sake... I am an emotional wreck now. (but I mean that in a good way)

>

 

Let me call you sweetheart

Im in love with you

Let me hear you whisper that you love me too

Keep the lovelight glowing in your eyes so true

Let me call you sweetheart

Im in love with you..."

 

One example really stands out in my mind a lot. There were these two little widow ladies (who are both long since gone) that used to attend our church many years ago. And they are a perfect example of what I am saying. My husband and I spent a lot of time driving the church van picking these two treasures (and a few others) up for Sunday AM and evening (and also Wednesday night) services and we got to know these gals very well.

 

One lady had three sons (all married) who always had at least ONE member of the family stopping by daily to check in on her, fix stuff around the house, help her w/ her shopping, take her to her doctor appointments, see to her daily needs (and they were many... she was quite elderly, very frail, and about 90% blind) She always talked about the latest things going on in her son's (and grandchildren's lives) and she was alert and vivacious right up to the very end of her life.

 

The other lady.....She had a lot of personal needs that she usually kept to herelf....she had some very serious health issues that eventually took her life.

 

Oh goodness, that story had me in tears again. That second lady sounds very familiar....keeping all her needs and health problems a secret and no doubt her children were grateful for that and suffered not a pang when she died. I know a few women like that and it's not only heartbreaking, it's frightening. I think growing old in today's society is tough because the family support system is broken. You can find yourself dependent on the kindness of strangers at a time in your life when only the familiar can soothe your anxiety, and the familiar recedes more and more daily.

 

Oh, don't let me get on my soapbox, I'll never shut up. :D

 

And in my mind, as the father was getting on that train... all I could think of was "Well.. I wonder which one will die first.. because neither one of them is going to last much longer without the other."

 

I believe the film bears this out, because I noticed something about the way that scene was shot that really made it seem even more foreboding. Pay attention to what direction the train is departing...from left to right...and what is to the right? Nothing but blackness (death?):

 

I like how honest Thomas Mitchell is about their behavior here, just prior to the

train departure of their parents. I also like that the parents took that evening to

themselves, and blew off the kids and their faux cheerful "send off" dinner which

would have been a horror. It's the one time they didn't "defer" to their kids and

to hear them they'd moved heaven and earth to put on this "party" (in Cora's dreary

flat):

vlcsnap-00121.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00122.jpg

 

Now see where they are walking from as they approach the train car...they are

proceeding out of the "light"...

vlcsnap-00123.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00124.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00128.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00129.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00131.jpg

 

Seems to me somehow, subtly, the blackness on the right side of the screen becomes more pronounced as the scene wears on.

vlcsnap-00132.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00134.jpg

 

Until it seems to engulf them both...

vlcsnap-00141.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00142.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00143.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00145.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00147.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00148.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00150.jpg

 

What Bondi conveys at this point with just her eyes is amazing...

vlcsnap-00151.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00152.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00153.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00154.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00155.jpg

 

And as a reminder, here is how the movie opened, with a shot of the couple's snug

little house...which the bank took over:

vlcsnap-00056.jpg

 

The scene where the mother interrupts the bridge games (with that room full of people) was so awkward to watch... and yet very telling. When she gets that phone call and is standing there trying to have a private conversation in the most PUBLIC place of all... did you see all the different expressions on all the various faces of those people. Some were embarrassed. They had NO clue how to deal with such open emotion on such a social level. Others were offended and you could clearly see how "low" they thought the whole situation was, likely judging their hostess as being less than "upper crust" for having such "homey" family members. Still others were "nostalgic" almost.. likely picturing their own mom and dad and how in love they were. And SOME... (thank goodness) were looking offended for a completely DIFFERENT reason.. you could see them going back and forth between expressions of compassion for the mother... and anger at the son and his wife. And you could tell they were judging their host and hostess for the POOR TREATMENT this dear gray haired lady was receiving. (or at least it looked that way to me)

 

Brilliant! This, to me, is the most extraordinary scene in the movie. Because McCarey gives you so many different...and changing...perspectives with the simplest of measures.

 

Fay Bainter, wife of their son Thomas Mitchell, is super as the "long suffering" daughter-in-law who really cares more for appearances and maintaining her position than she does about her family. She's a great example of the kind of selfish behavior that most people will never be aware of in themselves, it has so many "justifications" (Grandma is driving away her daughter's friends with her chatter; Grandma is embarrassing my Bridge clients...in other words, our smooth, slick life is being intruded upon by feelings and realities that most people spend their lives smothering under things and superficial pursuits...sound familiar?)

 

vlcsnap-00065.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00066.jpg

 

When Grandma arrives home from the movie they packed her off to earlier, she naturally starts chatting with people before her. She thinks that's what you do when you see them: you talk to people. How scandalous! It's remarkable how McCarey can show us how society can view the most natural, normal behavior as some sort of "eccentricity" on the part of the old woman.

 

vlcsnap-00067.jpg

 

 

In the phone call scene, Bainter is pained by Grandma's presence at her Bridge class (she teaches to earn extra money she says, but one suspects it's as much to feed her ego and desire to believe that she's "in society") and her various expressions are hilarious. Really, it's one of Bainter's most brilliant performances. The whole room is a study in human reactions.

 

vlcsnap-00068.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00069.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00070.jpg

 

It's simply marvelous how McCarey confronts these insular people with a normal,

human situation and as you pointed out: All the different people at that party and their facial expressions (to me) were like all the various attitudes most of our society seems to have even today toward how to deal w/ "mom and dad" as the years go by and time catches up with them all. How one feels about it all (again, to me) is very telling of their character and of who they really are as a person.

 

vlcsnap-00071.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00072.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00073.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00074.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00075.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00076.jpg

 

 

 

Now having said that... I MUST confess... sometimes.. you do reap what you sow. Some parents are so awful and upleasant (and even abusive) to the point that they should not be surprised to find themselves alone at the end of their lives.... but I do not think they are the "norm" of those who are left alone. I think most elderly folks who are neglected late in life are in that situation because their families have "moved on" and now mom and dad are "out of sight, out of mind" It is a tragedy to me to even think such a thing. (golly I am sounding kind of judgemental right now... who do I think I am???)

 

You're "out of sight out of mind" point gets to the heart of it. It's amazing how easily this society can shuntle off the elderly into the dark because they can't care for them. The sad part is people made it so that they can't care for them by choosing to create a world where you have work like a dog to keep up with the Joneses and have no time or energy to...to be human toward your folk. Woops! My soap box, how did it get back in here? :D

 

Oh wow..you are SO right about Cora. but you know.. to me... although she put on a "public' face for others.... at least to her DAD she was pretty much the most honest of all those kids. NO false pretense of a show of kindness when it was just HIM. She really let him know what a burden she thought he was. OH MY GOLLY was she ever hateful. How DARE her parents.... the ones who gave her life and provided her every need, and loved her all of her days even think to impose themselves on her.. be it one at a time. WHO do they think they are interrupting her life that way. GOOD grief.... stand in line if you want to knock HER around, kid. I am way ahead of you.

 

HA! Good point, Mrs Peacemaker. She sure dropped her phony facade quick enough when only Dad, helpless in sickness, was around. Did you see how she dragged him from that (I'm sure) dirty sofa up to a bed upstairs just to impress the doctor that she was caring for him properly?

 

Oh, how I did run on, but I love this movie so much. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! MissG, that was amazing! I love to read you when you are on a roll....

 

I won't intrude on the conversation too much here, but I did want to say that I LOVE Maurice Moscovich and he would make a great addition to the character actors thread, as would most everyone else in this cast. Fay Bainter is another favorite of mine.

 

Moscovich has a wonderfully expressive craggy face, and I only wish he had made a hundred more movies. I know him from Love Affair, In Name Only, and The Great DIctator mostly.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 23, 2010 9:49 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...