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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I hope you'll chime in whenever you feel like later on. No rambles ever really die.

>

> Terrific! :P

 

I was going to add a caveat just for your sake. I see now I should have.

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I was going to add a caveat just for your sake. I see now I should have.

 

Too bad! But I shall not interrupt more than I already have.

 

By the way, what have you done with your partner in Grimes, Mad Hat? I want to

know what Mad Hat thinks of MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW. He disappeared again!

 

He has a life!

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OH little darlin.. you are breaking me up all over again w/ those lovely screencaps. Oh me. You have hit all the most touching moments.

 

When are we going to take out Cora?

 

Let's do it. ha. She's going down. :D

 

Maurice Moscovich was the kindly Jewish proprietor who saw so much more than he let on, and felt it all. I don't know much about him, but maybe he'd be an interesting candidate for JackFavell's wonderful character actor thread

 

I thought he was terrific. And yes.. he'd be an excellent one to put on that list of character actors. He was just so "real" in that role. And you are right... he saw MUCH more than he let on. He was a true friend... and the way he stood up to Cora (but not so much as to be rude to her) I thought was terrific. Especially when the chicken soup got "dissed". Something tells me that if we want to take Cora out.. ha.. HE would be the one we'd both have to get in line behind.

 

Let me call you sweetheart

Im in love with you

Let me hear you whisper that you love me too

Keep the lovelight glowing in your eyes so true

Let me call you sweetheart

Im in love with you..."

 

Oh now you've done it. Oh golly. That is THE song. I don't know what there was about that song exactly but I just recall my grandma used to sing that alot (and then dance with us) when we were little. And it made me think of her so much. And then it is such an emotional moment in the film too as they are standing there in that ballroom and the music changes JUST as they get to the dance floor (and of couse it is some "jazzy" number they can't dance to... and the bandleader changes the music JUST for them. But when it really hit me was when they start singing it in the taxi. It tipped the scales for me. The emotions were just too real when they were there going to the train station and he is singing just to her. I love when he gets to the part "Let me hear you whisper that you love me too" she looks up at him and whispers, "I love you too" OH gosh.

 

Here... why should I be the only one crying... go to about 4 minutes and 22 second or so.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGaLk6fB6gU&feature=related

 

You can find yourself dependent on the kindness of strangers at a time in your life when only the familiar can soothe your anxiety, and the familiar recedes more and more daily.

 

You know "the kindness of strangers" has a ring of truth to it. It is not always the case... because very often people will walk by and NEVER notice those in need around them. But I was thinking that at least in this story... from about the time they go for their walk... and they run into the car salesman... and then they go to that hotel.... all the people they run into treat them better and with greater respect and affection than their own children. They are REAL people to these strangers and they are valued as human beings. No one is looking at them as burdens on society or as being "passed their expiration date". They are treated like they were important. How sad that their own family... the ones who SHOULD love them the most could not have seen the way strangers were treating their parents.. and then maybe they could have taken a lesson or two.

 

like how honest Thomas Mitchell is about their behavior here, just prior to the

train departure of their parents.

 

I got a sense that of all of the kids.. he felt the most guilty for what was going on. But not guilty enough to stand up to his wife and do what needed to done.

 

I also like that the parents took that evening to themselves, and blew off the kids and their faux cheerful "send off" dinner which would have been a horror. It's the one time they didn't "defer" to their kids and to hear them they'd moved heaven and earth to put on this "party" (in Cora's dreary

flat)

 

OH gosh.. talk about "a last supper" How in the world would ANYONE be able to choke down whatever she was serving with all the things that were going on, meanwhile NO one wanted to talk about it. How ugly a scene that would have been. (and PS: wouldn't you have LOVED to hear whatever it was the dad said to her in his little whisper over the phone?? ha. I bet it was something like.. "Watch out, girl... April and Kathy are coming for you" HA!! (ok.. maybe it wasn't that... but I doubt she would have looked more shocked than she did if he had said that. Ha. I only WISH I could have been a little bug on that phone line, ha.)

 

Now see where they are walking from as they approach the train car...they are

proceeding out of the "light

 

That was a great catch... and the darkness that sort of surrounds them at the end too. It really paints a gloomy picture of their future, doesn't it. And you did a great job of capturing Beulah's expressions too as the train is pulling away. TOO heartbreaking. (wasn't she just something? I think this has to be one of my most favorite performances for her)

 

Fay Bainter, wife of their son Thomas Mitchell, is super as the "long suffering" daughter-in-law who really cares more for appearances and maintaining her position than she does about her family. She's a great example of the kind of selfish behavior that most people will never be aware of in themselves, it has so many "justifications"

 

She really did do a great job. She was just as two faced as Cora in a way.. but not as openly mean about it. Still... when she does show her true feelings and let loose on the grandma.. OH me. She did feel awfully "justified". And perhaps... MAYBE she had a small point (about how the grandma should have told them about the daughter... but then the grandma should NEVER have been "shipped off" with the daughter in the first place. Still... I think that Fay would have found any reason to unload on her mother in law.. she'd been only "half" holding it in anyway for so long.. and now she was happy to finally have an excuse to let her real feelings fly.

 

It's amazing how easily this society can shuntle off the elderly into the dark because they can't care for them. The sad part is people made it so that they can't care for them by choosing to create a world where you have work like a dog to keep up with the Joneses and have no time or energy to...to be human toward your folk. Woops! My soap box, how did it get back in here?

 

You are so right about how people have almost made it so that it impossible to keep "mom and dad" home to be cared for. People do it to themselves as well. Some day the clock will tick down to where it is OUR time to be looked after (or at the very least, assisted.) And then it will be the next generation making those choices for this one. I wonder what sort of lessons they will have learned THEN by observing the way society runs NOW. Kinda scary aint it? (Oh gee.. ha. Now I am on that soapbox with you.. ha.)

 

I want to thank you again, Miss G for pointing this film out to me. It truly is an almost "lost" treasure. I hope more folks will seek it out and watch. It is so touching and very timely.

 

PS I want to go back and look at both reviews that got posted (by you and Jackie) but I am going to have to wait until I am not so doggone tired and blurry eyed. ha. This old woman has just about "hit the wall" for my day, ha.

 

PSS Jackie... I hope YOU have more to say about it all kiddo. (have you finally recovered from that Westward the Women crying fest? ha) In fact I imagine there are several (some you have mentioned already Miss G and maybe others) who could relate to this story.

 

PS.. Grey Dude... I hope you will chime in because I KNOW you have got to have some thoughts on all this, what with your city/country grandmas. Don't make me have to tell those sweet gals how you've been slacking off around here. :P

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Missed Roseanna McCoy, pretty much for the same reason Maven did.... I really hate those backwoods stories... Hope Emerson though.... hmmm. It takes someone special to make me break out of my irrational prejudice against hillbilly stories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I didn't know quite what to expect with ROSEANNA McCOY -- I'm not a fan of backwoods dramas myself and all the caricaturing that goes on -- they're usually over the top with lust, violence, and inbred idiot locals. Not that RM doesn't deal with these issues, lol, but the Loesser music and lovely cinematography lift this above the usual fare.

>

> Sex and the SIngle Girl is remarkably good for what it is... I haven't seen it for years, but I was always surprised by it. And the clothes.... absolutely!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I thought it was going to be smirky and cynical, but it wasn't. Natalie had such the perfect little figure to wear those clothes.

>

> Nat was really good at comedy. My first experience with that was in The Great Race, although her character is a bit dated now, I still enjoy her so much in it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I've never seen THE GREAT RACE. For some reason, the title alone has always made me have an aversion to it, like IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> ?Oh, Sweet Tea, how adorable! Thanks so much -- you're definitely ALL angel. But yes, only cider, young lady. I don't want you floating around in Joseph Cotten's bedroom.?

>

> Uhmmmmm...and that would be a bad thing??? Wait!!! Joseph Cotten in ?Love Letters? or Joseph Cotten in ?Shadow of a Doubt???? Joseph Cotten in "Duel in the Sun" or Joseph Cotten in "Niagara"??? It depends on which Cotten she cottons to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nah, it's Joe with Loretta in HALF ANGEL. He's benign, but, you don't want to rile him....

>

> ?Not even a quick glance in front of the Empire State Building to see the outline of Kong's body in the cement? ...?

>

> Naaaaaah. Straight to the ice cream parlor...but on 2nd thought, we would work up an appetitie if we went shopping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, shopping and food, two of my favorite pasttimes. We can also go to Katz's Delicatessen on the LES for a pastrami sandwich and a Cel-Ray tonic.

 

Then, later to Curry In a Hurry on 29th and 3rd. (is it still around? I haven't eaten there in over 20 years either) I'll spring for the Rolaids.

>

> No Bronxie, I didn?t watch ?Roseanna McCoy.? Hillbilly settings and log cabins never attract my attention. (Can't do "Drums Along the Mohawk" or the first part of "Sgt. York" etc.). If I ever catch ?Tobacco Road? it?d just be for Gene. I also didn?t see ?Sex and the Single Girl? but I love those sexy, sixties, silly, sex farces. OOoohhh, Fran Jeffries again, huh? Maybe I can catch up on things when I?m back in New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I could understand an aversion to something like ROSEANNA McCOY and I sympathize with you about the first half of SGT. YORK, lol, but, believe me, DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK should be seen. It might be too picturesque for you, but that's one of its charms for me. I haven't seen TOBACCO ROAD, though.

 

The real funny pair in SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL are Lauren Bacall and Henry Fonda. Nat and Tony are cute too,

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Apr 24, 2010 3:31 AM

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> > What did everybody think of SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL? I was pleasantly surprised. I mean, I thought it was going to be pretty crass and ring-a-ding-dingy, but it actually had a kind of loopy charm, and the farcial highway finale was worthy of Blake Edwards. Lauren Bacall's temper was very funny, and I loved seeing Henry Fonda channel his deftly amusing Preston Sturges comic romantic persona. Such a refreshing change from all those serious, message-minded Presidential-type parts he was playing at the time. Tony already had his cynical city-boy hustler character iconically imprinted with the audience, so that role was a day in the park for him, and I liked the way he "eased" Natalie into her good-natured, cute performance. And Fran Jeffries hip rendition of "The Anniversary Waltz" (with Lauren and Henry dancing the Twist to it, lol) is reason enough to watch!

>

> I've seen it about two times before, and the first time I hated it (mostly because of Tony) and the second time I started to like it because of Nat and her STUNNING WARDROBE. Honestly, she has some of the most gorgeous outfits and gowns of her whole career in this movie and proves that a tiny woman can knock those 7 foot stick insects out of the water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is Tony one of your bete noirs like the other Tony, and Don? My favorite Natalie outfit in SATSG is that chic suit she wears when she guiltily visits Lauren at her apartment to "straighten" things out. And of course she looks spectacular in that white dress.

>

> I just love Nat as a comedienne....I feel it was a relatively untapped talent, she only seemed to do a few comedies. Love her as Penelope, a really DUMB comedy but I can't help it, it's my cuppa tea. She was a "screwball" with the best of them (Carole, Myrna, etc) at a time that kind of comedy was already on the wane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I've never seen PENELOPE. Isn't that one of Grimes's favorites

>

> I also found Lauren's temperamental outbursts very funny.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, her on and off again tantrums were a hoot. And I liked how she called Natalie "kid". I could see her doing that offscreen as well.

>

> Like the Maven, I enjoy these "fluffies" from the sixties. Especially the clothes....oh, the clothes!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, me too. That white number looks really fantastic on her. And I've always loved her hair and makeup.

>

> NatinSTSG.jpg

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Ah good - SEX & THE SINGLE GIRL instead of making me explain my tearful attraction for MAKE WAY!

 

I've seen SEX dozens of times and, for me, this is a Bacall film. I know there are some other actors in it, but whatever scene she's in, she is the impetus and motor to it.

 

When she's been rushed into the anteroom (which is NOT related to AntiChrist, AntiFreeze OR AntiFuzz, my dear MissG), then comes out saying, "Did I hear correctly - that other woman claims to be married to my husband?", she's got this terrific face. First a slightly quizzical look then her eyes go stone-cold gorgon-esque - turning any guy to stone.

 

She gets to use every look in her arsenal in this film, and about every voice inflection, too. I just wish she'd had a chance to lean over a desk and purr into Fonda's ear at some point. Oh yeah - that's the other actor's name. Fonda something! Now I remember!

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PS.. Grey Dude... I hope you will chime in because I KNOW you have got to have some thoughts on all this, what with your city/country grandmas. Don't make me have to tell those sweet gals how you've been slacking off around here.

 

I'm innocent! I only tell them they are sometimes a burden. :P

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I'm innocent!

 

That'll be the day. :P

 

I only tell them they are sometimes a burden

 

The very idea... talking to your beloved grandmas like that. You whippersnapper. :P For that you deserve what MY dear (long departed) old grandma called.... a swift kick in... the beautiful morning glory. (HA!) :P But maybe those sweet ladies will settle for me lending them one of my hatpins to use on you instead. :P

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I have always wanted to see *Make Way for Tomorrow*, for some reason I thought TCM was scheduling it soon. I didn't miss it, did I? Maybe I saw that it was just released on DVD or something. Anyway, I just can't watch it on youtube. I'm snooty that way! :P

 

I'll have to wait until I can get the DVD.

 

Oh and by the way I nearly started to babble on about *The Best Years of Our Lives* over in the "Information Please" forum, of all places. Then I remembered I still owed you a ramble on that one so I clammed up quick!

 

Are you keeping that rope cold? :)

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*MissGoddess wrote:*

 

*By the way, what have you done with your partner in Grimes, Mad Hat? I want to*

*know what Mad Hat thinks of MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW. He disappeared again!*

 

I do have a bad habit of doing that don't I? Consarn it!

Like I said in my last post, I haven't seen it yet, but I want to.

 

*FrankGrimes wrote:*

 

*He has a life!*

 

Yes I'm been VERY busy! ;)

 

idlehours.jpg?t=1272354322

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Anyway, I just can't watch it on youtube. I'm snooty that way!

 

What, are you a youtube snob?????????????????? :P Here... watch this youtube... Come on... I triple dog dare ya..... HA! It's only a couple of minutes.... you will live through it...

 

 

 

Oh and by the way I nearly started to babble on about The Best Years of Our Lives over in the "Information Please" forum, of all places. Then I remembered I still owed you a ramble on that one so I clammed up quick!

 

GASP!!

 

Are you keeping that rope cold?

 

What do YOU think???? Start ramblin' before I have to start ropin'. :P It's been a while since our last necktie party. We can make you our guest of honor.

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Hello, Peacemaker,

 

 

> I thought he was terrific. And yes.. he'd be an excellent one to put on that list of character actors. He was just so "real" in that role. And you are right... he saw MUCH more than he let on. He was a true friend... and the way he stood up to Cora (but not so much as to be rude to her) I thought was terrific. Especially when the chicken soup got "dissed". Something tells me that if we want to take Cora out.. ha.. HE would be the one we'd both have to get in line behind.

>

 

:D Maurice definitely had Cora's number after the first door slam. I thought Cora's behavior

was so snobbish, and what had SHE to be snobbish about with her raggedy housekeeping

and unkempt appearance. She's one of those who sweep the dust under the carpets and

then carry on like a martyr for eternity over how imposed upon she is.

 

The more I contemplate the film from a distance, the more I realize that it's not really

that McCarey is even handed in his projection of the parents vs. the kids, it's that his

camera, his depiction, is unobtrusive. He allows, without pusing, the audience to come to the

conclusion that the kids are truly guilty of inexcusable selfishness. I believe the reviewer in the

article JackFavell posted said that there "was no way the children could take on more

than one person"....that's flat out not true. They ALL could have taken in both. People

in other countries live as much as 20 people in one much smaller apartment, and those

people often are much happier in their family relationships in spite of having nothing,

materially. Take the family of Thomas Mitchell, they have a MAID and live in a posh

apartment complex, excuse me? They can DEFINITELY take them both in with the

most ease. Unbelievable what people consider "impossible".

 

 

> Oh now you've done it. Oh golly. That is THE song. I don't know what there was about that song exactly but I just recall my grandma used to sing that alot (and then dance with us) when we were little. And it made me think of her so much. And then it is such an emotional moment in the film too as they are standing there in that ballroom and the music changes JUST as they get to the dance floor (and of couse it is some "jazzy" number they can't dance to... and the bandleader changes the music JUST for them. But when it really hit me was when they start singing it in the taxi. It tipped the scales for me. The emotions were just too real when they were there going to the train station and he is singing just to her. I love when he gets to the part "Let me hear you whisper that you love me too" she looks up at him and whispers, "I love you too" OH gosh.

>

 

It's a sweet song, and how lovely your grandmother sang it to you. I loved the scene on the

dance floor.

 

> You know "the kindness of strangers" has a ring of truth to it. It is not always the case... because very often people will walk by and NEVER notice those in need around them. But I was thinking that at least in this story... from about the time they go for their walk... and they run into the car salesman... and then they go to that hotel.... all the people they run into treat them better and with greater respect and affection than their own children. They are REAL people to these strangers and they are valued as human beings. No one is looking at them as burdens on society or as being "passed their expiration date". They are treated like they were important. How sad that their own family... the ones who SHOULD love them the most could not have seen the way strangers were treating their parents.. and then maybe they could have taken a lesson or two.

>

 

Yes, isn't it funny how strangers were nicer to them? Of course, one wonders

are they as nice to their OWN parents, to whom they have some responsibility?

It's easy to be nice to people you may never see again.

 

>

> I got a sense that of all of the kids.. he felt the most guilty for what was going on. But not guilty enough to stand up to his wife and do what needed to done.

>

 

You said it. The wife throws a hissy fit (I'm sorry, that's what it was) and suddenly

he's sending his mom to an old folks home.

 

> OH gosh.. talk about "a last supper" How in the world would ANYONE be able to choke down whatever she was serving with all the things that were going on, meanwhile NO one wanted to talk about it. How ugly a scene that would have been. (and PS: wouldn't you have LOVED to hear whatever it was the dad said to her in his little whisper over the phone?? ha. I bet it was something like.. "Watch out, girl... April and Kathy are coming for you" HA!! (ok.. maybe it wasn't that... but I doubt she would have looked more shocked than she did if he had said that. Ha. I only WISH I could have been a little bug on that phone line, ha.)

>

 

I forgot about the phone conversation! Yes, it sounded like the Dad was finally telling his

daughter off. And there was Beaulah, worrying he was being mean. I can see where

their spoiled behavior comes from.

 

> That was a great catch... and the darkness that sort of surrounds them at the end too. It really paints a gloomy picture of their future, doesn't it. And you did a great job of capturing Beulah's expressions too as the train is pulling away. TOO heartbreaking. (wasn't she just something? I think this has to be one of my most favorite performances for her)

>

 

She's incredible, so was Victor Moore, who I have only seen in comic parts. He was apparently an old vaudeville veteran. It's great how McCarey knew how to get dramatic performances out of comic actors, and comic peformances out of dramatic performers (I'm thinking of Irene Dunne).

 

>

> She really did do a great job. She was just as two faced as Cora in a way.. but not as openly mean about it. Still... when she does show her true feelings and let loose on the grandma.. OH me. She did feel awfully "justified". And perhaps... MAYBE she had a small point (about how the grandma should have told them about the daughter... but then the grandma should NEVER have been "shipped off" with the daughter in the first place. Still... I think that Fay would have found any reason to unload on her mother in law.. she'd been only "half" holding it in anyway for so long.. and now she was happy to finally have an excuse to let her real feelings fly.

>

 

You said it perfectly. Fay did have some justification, but I don't think she really was paying much attention to her daughter and what she was doing. I get the feeilng she was a social climber and

was more concerned about her daughter's "prospects" or position in society would be jeapordized

by the mother-in-law, than about anything else.

 

>

> You are so right about how people have almost made it so that it impossible to keep "mom and dad" home to be cared for. People do it to themselves as well. Some day the clock will tick down to where it is OUR time to be looked after (or at the very least, assisted.) And then it will be the next generation making those choices for this one. I wonder what sort of lessons they will have learned THEN by observing the way society runs NOW. Kinda scary aint it? (Oh gee.. ha. Now I am on that soapbox with you.. ha.)

>

 

Scary indeed. Especially since the economic crisis has sent a lot of adult "kids" BACK home

because they lost everything. One hopes they'll remember the favor when it comes time for

the parents to be cared for.

 

> I want to thank you again, Miss G for pointing this film out to me. It truly is an almost "lost" treasure. I hope more folks will seek it out and watch. It is so touching and very timely.

>

 

I'm so glad you chatted with me here, about it. It's a very sad film, but an important one,

I believe, and also I think more attention and interest should be thrown on the director,

*Leo McCarey*, who is unfairly overlooked today. He was brilliant.

 

>

> PS.. Grey Dude... I hope you will chime in because I KNOW you have got to have some thoughts on all this, what with your city/country grandmas. Don't make me have to tell those sweet gals how you've been slacking off around here. :P

 

Let's not hold our breath. :P

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Howdy there, Miss G,

 

> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> :D Maurice definitely had Cora's number after the first door slam. I thought Cora's behavior

> was so snobbish, and what had SHE to be snobbish about with her raggedy housekeeping

> and unkempt appearance. She's one of those who sweep the dust under the carpets and

> then carry on like a martyr for eternity over how imposed upon she is.

 

Well it looks like Maurice is not the only one who has Cora's number. (ha) Sweeping the dirt under the rug is exactly what Cora was all about. That is a perfect way to describe her... literally and figuratively.

 

> The more I contemplate the film from a distance, the more I realize that it's not really

> that McCarey is even handed in his projection of the parents vs. the kids, it's that his

> camera, his depiction, is unobtrusive. He allows, without pusing, the audience to come to the

> conclusion that the kids are truly guilty of inexcusable selfishness.

 

I think you have fine tuned your earlier remark just right. I agree that the camera more or less tells it all and everything is all laid out in an objective way so we get to see them w/out being told what to think of them. (But the message is loud and clear all the same)

 

> They can DEFINITELY take them both in with the

> most ease. Unbelievable what people consider "impossible".

 

That is one of the reasons I think Thomas Mitchell's character appeared to have the most "guilt" on his conscience. I think he was more or less better off than his brother and sisters and he knew that even if it were true that the others could take them (and I agree with you that likely any of them COULD have made it work) but even if they COULDN'T.... I think it was OBVIOUS that he could. (but again, he let his wife and her "snobbery" make his choice for him.

 

> Scary indeed. Especially since the economic crisis has sent a lot of adult "kids" BACK home

> because they lost everything. One hopes they'll remember the favor when it comes time for

> the parents to be cared for.

 

It probably will depend on how they "feel" about whether it is right or wrong.... OH golly.. don't even get me started on the "situational ethics" culture. But that is the sad truth of the world we are living in now days.. (picture me, rolling my eyes in disgust) And no.. I am not so naive (or even judgmental) to say that EVERY kid owes that to their parents someday.... but the scenario you painted (where the empty nest comes home... depends on his parents again for support... then flies off again... only to dump mom and dad someday when they need help... well... it IS all about what's best for the "children" now days isn't it.. even when they stop being children... (ok.. push me off the soapbox any time now, ha)

 

> > PS.. Grey Dude... I hope you will chime in because I KNOW you have got to have some thoughts on all this, what with your city/country grandmas. Don't make me have to tell those sweet gals how you've been slacking off around here. :P

 

> Let's not hold our breath. :P

 

HA!!!! Yes.. let's not do that.. blue has never been my color!!! ha. :D

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Howdy, Ro!

 

> That is one of the reasons I think Thomas Mitchell's character appeared to have the most "guilt" on his conscience. I think he was more or less better off than his brother and sisters and he knew that even if it were true that the others could take them (and I agree with you that likely any of them COULD have made it work) but even if they COULDN'T.... I think it was OBVIOUS that he could. (but again, he let his wife and her "snobbery" make his choice for him.

>

 

I like how McCarey introduces us to the home of Mitchell and Fay Bainter:

 

Somehow, it's all so impersonal and they're squeezed into one of those "blocks" like pastrami in a sandwich. But ooooh, they are so snooty about their position, ignoring the humiliating aspect of being just a "block" in an impersonal pile of blocks:

 

vlcsnap-00061.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00062.jpg

 

vlcsnap-00063.jpg

 

(Funny, how he has "Mr." before his name, unlike the other tenants. It makes the Coopers

seem even more pretentious. I love these details)

vlcsnap-00064.jpg

 

By the way, the mentality of the Coopers still runs rampant here in Manrattan. People who are months behind on their rent in those luxury skyscrapers turn their noses up at the rest of the "peons". Like the Coopers, who give the impression they really are living a bit beyond their means, or else why does Fay have to teach Bridge? They're climbers, or what we call now "wannabe's" alright.

 

> It probably will depend on how they "feel" about whether it is right or wrong.... OH golly.. don't even get me started on the "situational ethics" culture. But that is the sad truth of the world we are living in now days.. (picture me, rolling my eyes in disgust) And no.. I am not so naive (or even judgmental) to say that EVERY kid owes that to their parents someday.... but the scenario you painted (where the empty nest comes home... depends on his parents again for support... then flies off again... only to dump mom and dad someday when they need help... well... it IS all about what's best for the "children" now days isn't it.. even when they stop being children... (ok.. push me off the soapbox any time now, ha)

>

 

"Situational ethics"---that's the first time I've come across that expression...excellent! It's perfect. They're going to shove us off our soap boxes any minute because I quite agree with you and could go on and on.

 

More people NEED to see this movie.

 

> > > PS.. Grey Dude... I hope you will chime in because I KNOW you have got to have some thoughts on all this, what with your city/country grandmas. Don't make me have to tell those sweet gals how you've been slacking off around here. :P

>

> > Let's not hold our breath. :P

>

> HA!!!! Yes.. let's not do that.. blue has never been my color!!! ha. :D

 

He's been suspiciously quiet...is it because he's planning on yanking our soap boxes from under us?

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