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Now I can appreciate how she was just acting according to the depth of her ignorance

 

I loved the part when Atticus tries to "explain" her behavior to the jury.. by saying she was a victim of cruel poverty and ignorance".... and immediately I also thought how she was an unfortunate by-product of it as well. Hate and maliciousness and low behavior in a parent usually (but not always) begets the same in their children (if that is all they are exposed to). And that is not to say that all ignorant poor people from the south (or anywhere else) will end up as Mayella did.. but wow.. she was a very good "type" of the sort of person who might come from the background that she did (given all she'd been taught by those around her).

 

she reminded me of of my bete noir, Pippi Longstocking, LOL

 

YIKES. ha. I had not noticed it before but you may be right!! ha. I DO see a resemblance.. ha. OH me.. that just adds even MORE pity (AND disgust) for her in my heart. HA!

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I like the line up this year too. As for *To Kill a Mockingbird* it is filled with a lot of great "little" scenes. I agree with April about how it perfectly illustrates the child's point of view.

 

On a side note, the reclusive Mary Badham lives just a few miles from me. :)

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Well what do you know... MAD HAT is in the house! :D YOU have been missed, sir.

 

I agree with April about how it perfectly illustrates the child's point of view.

 

It was a terrific way to present such a really heavy and thought-provoking story. Very well told. (I liked the music too.. the way it was so "sing songy and "hummy" sometimes. Very child like as well.

 

On a side note, the reclusive Mary Badham lives just a few miles from me.

 

Oh golly... way cool.

 

You are in "Mockingbird" territory aren't you. Did you get to play a Ham in your school play too? :P

 

PS: Miss G.. I almost forgot to mention.. something I NEVER noticed before in this movie.. ha.. I FOUND Claude Dagle's LOST spelling medal. :D It must have gotten blown into the stump of that tree what with that huge lightening strike and all) HA!

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Jun 20, 2010 11:53 PM

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> PS: Miss G.. I almost forgot to mention.. something I NEVER noticed before in this movie.. ha.. I FOUND Claude Dagle's LOST spelling medal. :D It must have gotten blown into the stump of that tree what with that huge lightening strike and all) HA!

>

 

Ohhhhh....hahahahahahahhaahaaa!!! So THAT'S where it went!! I thought Rhoda managed to "take it with her", and it melted. :P:P

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> I loved the part when Atticus tries to "explain" her behavior to the jury.. by saying she was a victim of cruel poverty and ignorance".... and immediately I also thought how she was an unfortunate by-product of it as well. Hate and maliciousness and low behavior in a parent usually (but not always) begets the same in their children (if that is all they are exposed to). And that is not to say that all ignorant poor people from the south (or anywhere else) will end up as Mayella did.. but wow.. she was a very good "type" of the sort of person who might come from the background that she did (given all she'd been taught by those around her).

>

 

You're so much more understanding than I ever was. I just wanted to smack her, lol.

But I do feel sorry that such conditions of ignorance still exist and promote similar

behavior and attitudes.

 

I do think this was Peck's greatest work as an actor, and a marvelous role to

be remembered for.

 

Did you ever see the wonderful documentary about him, produced, I believe, by

his daughter? There is one part that takes place during one of his public appearances,

sort of a chance for him to answer questions from an audience and in this case, one

of the audience members was the girl who played Scout. I think Peck shared that

the author, Harper Lee, sent him her father's watch in tribute to his wonderful performance.

 

What a charming, captivating man he was in real life. And so darn handsome to the end!

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I never played a ham

 

So are you saying you never got to play "the ham" in a school program about smoked pork products... or (drum roll please) that you ARE one??? (with or without the school play) HA! :P

 

(OH golly.. someone new to torment for a change.. the Grey Guy will be so happy...) ha.

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*On a side note, the reclusive Mary Badham lives just a few miles from me*

 

 

Could we get to the TCM Film Festival next year if one of the kids from *Mockingbird* were there to introduce the film? I noticed that someone had made the suggestion in the Film Festival thread and thought it was a great idea. Here's hoping that TPTB think it is a great idea as well.

 

What do you say, Madhat?

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*I think Peck shared that the author, Harper Lee, sent him her father's watch in tribute to his wonderful performance.*

 

She also told him that he had "a paunch" just like her daddy.

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You're so much more understanding than I ever was. I just wanted to smack her

 

OH believe me.. the urge to smack was there too. Ha. And the dad.. OH GOLLY.. not just smack.. he got off EASY by the end of the film compared to what I would have liked to have seen done. GOOD GRIEF what a hateful man.

 

do think this was Peck's greatest work as an actor, and a marvelous role to

be remembered for.

 

I have to agree with you on both counts, though I must confess I am not likely as "up' on all his roles as I should be. But based on those I have seen this one is my most favorite for him (The Big Country is likely a very close second)

 

Did you ever see the wonderful documentary about him, produced, I believe, by

his daughter? There is one part that takes place during one of his public appearances,

sort of a chance for him to answer questions from an audience and in this case, one

of the audience members was the girl who played Scout. I think Peck shared that

the author, Harper Lee, sent him her father's watch in tribute to his wonderful performance

 

No, I don't think I ever saw that (at least not that I can recall) What a nice tribute to him that she gave him that watch. That is really something. I did see some sort of documentary that was on a VHS tape of this movie (I think it was vhs) that I checked out of the library sometime last year (which was the last time I watched this film before tonight, by the way) it was more about the story (and the actors) and about Lee, too I think... rather than just about Peck. I can't remember as much about it as I should, but I do remember thinking it was really good to get all that extra insight into the story. (wish I could remember more about it now, ha)

 

What a charming, captivating man he was in real life. And so darn handsome to the end

 

I do not know much about his life, and to be honest.. I never really noticed his career much until about the last 25 years or so... I dont' know why... but he just never stood out much for me before that. But the way you have described him fits the impressions that I have of him now, for sure.

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> I never played a ham

>

> So are you saying you never got to play "the ham" in a school program about smoked pork products... or (drum roll please) that you ARE one??? (with or without the school play) HA! :P

>

> (OH golly.. someone new to torment for a change.. the Grey Guy will be so happy...) ha.

 

I think you have the answer. :D

 

I'm sure Frank will be happy if I just write something.... about Mogambo, Marnie, Clash By Night, Gilda, Scarlet Street....

 

I have a lot of work to do around here. Yikes!!!!!

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I think you have the answer

 

HA!! Was there ever any DOUBT??? :D

 

I'm sure Frank will be happy if I just write something.... about Mogambo, Marnie, Clash By Night, Gilda, Scarlet Street....

 

You left out The Best Years of Our Lives.. I'm still WAITING.....

 

I have a lot of work to do around here. Yikes!!!!!

 

Yikes indeed... get crackin', buster.. (don't MAKE me go get that rope out of the deep freeze) ha. :P

 

PS... the next TCM film fest... NOT the east coast... THE MIDWEST if you please!!! You "coast people ALWAYS get the good stuff... what about us "middle folk" for a change?? ha. (Kansas City... Please oh please oh PLEASE!!) :D

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The MIDWEST??? Is that in New Jersey? :)

 

I've never been there.

 

Oh yes, *The Best Years of Our Lives* , was that in this thread? I actually watched that one recently. I'll get right on it ma'am! :)

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Unfortunately, after the tremendous response TCM got for bringing old Hollywood back to new Hollywood, the 2011 Film Festival will be back in Hollywood.

 

Start saving those nickels and dimes. It's worth it!

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This is a special film that my children and I watch once in awhile. I took them to see it on the big screen several years ago. We had a fine time.

 

Two things get to me in the movie. One is the shot of Peck sitting on the porch swing listening to the kids talk. The other is Peck's exit from the courtroom. (I think that is LZ's favorite scene.)

 

There is a lot to be said about it. It holds a special place for my daughter because she told me that when the day comes she wants her children to call me Atticus. It's a nice thought but little kids tend to make up their own names for their grandparents. I am sure mine will be no different.

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Jun 21, 2010 10:39 AM

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molo! It's WONDERFUL to see you here! We were getting worried. :x :x

 

Chris - that is an amazing compliment - I can see a lot of Atticus in you.

 

Ro- I agree about Essentials Jr. this year.

 

I watched TKAM last night, and realized I had never seen it all the way through, just a half here and a hlaf there.

 

The thing I noticed the most was the silence of the men and women who had no voice in society. The way they saw _everything_, but kept quiet. The way Calpurnia looked, really looked and saw what Atticus was saying beyond the words the night before the trial, when he asked her to stay with the children. Her look reminded me of Hattie McDaniel, and the way she saw everything that was going on, and could give a line that told you she was smarter and more knowledgeable than anyone else in that movie. The silence of the old preacher man, tears falling down his face during the trial. The silence of the black men and women who filled the balcony, especially when the verdict was handed down. The way they said nothing when old man Ewell came into THEIR home, after THEIR son had been killed..... he was lucky to have got away with his life that night as far as I am concerned. Thank god thiings have changed, and people are not silent anymore!

 

I also noticed how upset judge Paul Fix was when he left the courtroom.

 

I noticed the way that trees were integral to the mystery of that place at that time, through a child's eyes....the first shot of the movie was down through the rustling leaves of the tree....

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jun 21, 2010 9:25 AM

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Hello there, little Ms Favell..

 

I did not realize you had never seen this one all the way through. It is such a great story, and so well done, I am glad you got to watch it from start to finish all at once.

 

The thing I noticed the most was the silence of the men and women who had no voice in society. The way they saw everything, but kept quiet.

 

That is a great point. I liked the look on Cal's face when Atticus asks her to stay w/ his kids. That woman was SOMETHING. I really admired her character a lot. And you were right too... when Ewell comes to the Robinson home (both times, in fact) he could have at the very least been run off the place EASILY.. but all those men there stayed silent. You know, on one level, it was really disheartening to see them NOT give him what he deserved. It was frustrating to see them just sit there and take it. (stick w/ me here, because I will get back to your point, ha) But It was like they understood... this is the way things are... and so long as there were Bob Ewell's in the world... nothing was ever going to change. It was so disheartening to see them be so "accepting" in a way of their lot in life. Did you also notice the look on Tom's face as they were leading him away. It was as if he KNEW that he was never going to get the justice he deserved, no matter how Atticus tried to encourage him. He had lost all faith. You KNEW he was giving up, just by the expression on his face. It was so sad to see it that by the time the sheriff shows up w/ the news of what happened later.. it was no suprise to hear.

 

Her look reminded me of Hattie McDaniel, and the way she saw everything that was going on, and could give a line that told you she was smarter and more knowledgeable than anyone else in that movie. The silence of the old preacher man, tears falling down his face during the trial. The silence of the black men and women who filled the balcony, especially when the verdict was handed down

 

And THAT is what takes those scenes to a whole OTHER level for me (instead of just the frustration I mentioned).. The "disheartened" feeling I felt was only a passing thing, because the silence you are talking about also just added so much to the respect I had for those characters. For example.. when Ewell shows up at the Robinson's... nothing would have been gained by them ganging up on him (except I'd have been able to get the satisfaction of cheering to see him get what he deserved) but in a way they were able to shame him by their LACK of action toward him... by keeping the anger they MUST have felt toward him in check, they rose SO much higher than he was (in terms of true character)

 

I felt the courtroom scene is a really good example of the strength of character aspect I am talking about as well. Those folks showed they had the strength to endure with grace beneath such a great injustice as the ones being carried out upon them daily and it is something that I really admired.

 

I am not saying it is always good to just "sit down and stay silent" because yes.. there is a time and a place to stand up and speak out... but the wisdom they showed... and again.. the grace they exhibited was really inspiring. They could have ranted and raved (and rightly so) at the verdict and all those who were on the jury. (And you are right, I think from look on Paul Fix's face HIS character wanted to do that as well) but instead they held their anger in check. They did not make the low actions of others cause them to do something to be lowered to that same level. Instead, they respected what was GOOD about everything that was so BAD going on around them.. and they did not lose THEIR integrity. That is what I think I admire the most about that scene and those characters. (And PS: That is a good lesson for ME to take away from this story.. and I am still learning it... I have a long way to go sometimes)

 

Atticus was a great example of the whole "maintain your integrity even in the face of justified anger" as well... I LOVED the scene where Peck comes out and Ewell spits on him... and Peck just drives him away w/out saying a word. I like how he took the one step forward as if to say, "NOW you are going to get it..." but he just stood there instead. By saying nothing and just standing there unflinching.. he was able to show all that more what a sniveling coward Ewell was.. . OH MY GOLLY was that a powerful moment in the story.

 

I also loved how Atticus was no respecter of persons.. and that he was teaching his children to be the same way. EVERYONE was shown respect and basic human dignity, and I like how he made sure they understood that those who are the "least among us" deserve it as much (if not more) as those who are the greatest. He wasn't "preachy" about it either. He just quietly led by example and gave those loving reminders from time to time as needed. I say again.. he was a great dad.

 

I noticed the way that trees were integral to the mystery of that place at that time, through a child's eyes....the first shot of the movie was down through the rustling leaves of the tree....

 

You have a wonderful eye for such details. And you are so right.. the creepy trees added to the level of childhood mystery.. and even a bit "fantasy" (especially in the scene near the end when they are caught in the woods) but also at other times, too. And I love the whole love/hate fascination with the "mysterious dark house" thing too. (when they are sneaking over to the Radly's)

 

One thing I liked too about how the whole thing was presented was the use of shadows in that fight scene near the end. And all you really get to see is Scout's eyes through that slit in her costume as she is watching that brutal scene play out in front of her. Pretty much all you get to see were hands and shadows.. and hands... and more shadows... That was really terrifying and yet so simply done. Again... from a child's perspective.

 

(PS: Mr MOVIEMAN... I am liking the idea of "Pa Pa Atticus" for a grandpa name. Wow.. that's a really great sign of the respect you have earned from you daughter... Embrace it! :-) When the day comes, I hope she follows through w/ the idea.) :-)

 

 

PS: Ms Cutter.. alas.. NO Film Fest for KC... sigh. :-)

 

PS: MOLO.. NEW JERSEY??? Where's my ROPE???? :P

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There are probably a couple of things that went on when Ewell shows up at the Robinson's. They son know "the way things are." Tom is already in trouble. Anything they do, no matter how justified, will only put them right in the same place. Also, Atticus is there. I don't think they would have dreamed of doing anything with him there. I think they respect him too much to do that.

 

Atticus shows no fear. When everyone comes to the jail cell I think he would have been enough to hold them off. What Scout said was really a tension breaker but he stands there resolute and unafraid. I think he still would have held them off.

 

The best part of Cal and how the kids love and respect her is when she gets after Scout for insulting Walter for all the syrup he put on his dinner. Cal scolds her and pops her on the butt and Scout doesn't complain to her father. Scout may not have liked it but she respected Cal's authority.

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I really wish TCM could come up with a schedule earlier next time around. What's playing would help determine if I want to spend those hard earned nickels and dimes of mine. Ha....not to mention the

pennies, too.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> I really wish TCM could come up with a schedule earlier next time around. What's playing would help determine if I want to spend those hard earned nickels and dimes of mine. Ha....not to mention the

> pennies, too.

 

It would have been nice to have known more of the schedule in advance, but I was determined

to be there no matter what. And I feel the need to reiterate lzcutter's earlier statement.. Save your nickels, dimes, and kopeks, kids!

 

The proximity to Grauman's with the footprints of the stars, and seeing films in the historic venues

of The Egyptian and Grauman's makes it worthwhile for everyone. The classy atmosphere of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel and the fun at Club TCM make the whole adventure a blast

 

I hope you'll get to be there next year, CineMaven. :)

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Anything they do, no matter how justified, will only put them right in the same place. Also, Atticus is there. I don't think they would have dreamed of doing anything with him there. I think they respect him too much to do that

 

I imagine you are right, Mr. Movieman... on both counts. And I am sure that it all at least played a factor in their decision as well.

 

Atticus shows no fear. When everyone comes to the jail cell I think he would have been enough to hold them off. What Scout said was really a tension breaker but he stands there resolute and unafraid. I think he still would have held them off.

 

I don't know. I imagine you could be right, but I am glad it did not play out that way so we did not have to find out. I don't know if my heart could have taken it. (ha) I see your point that he was pretty much a "force to be reckoned with" just by his character and stature, etc... resolute is a good word for it. But I liked that her innocence ended up being the final straw in shaming them all and sending them back home. And I also liked how Jem stood up to his dad when he told him to leave. He seemed to understand too that their presence there with him was a way of keeping things from escalating. I think he really understood that his dad could be in serious danger if they left (And I also think he'd have lit into the first person who laid a finger on his dad, if given half a chance). He was a "protector" by nature, it seems to me. (I think it comes from being the oldest)

 

(HA... one thing I DID notice about that scene though that did not ring true.. it was night time.. it was summer.. it was the south.. he is sitting there with a bright lamp less than a foot away from his head... WHERE were the doggone BUGS that should have been buzzing around him EVERYWHERE??? ha... I know.. Get over it, Kathy.. it was only a movie.. ha)

 

The best part of Cal and how the kids love and respect her is when she gets after Scout for insulting Walter for all the syrup he put on his dinner. Cal scolds her and pops her on the butt and Scout doesn't complain to her father. Scout may not have liked it but she respected Cal's authority.

 

I liked that part too. She really was a terrific character. Cal's role in their lives was SO way more important to all of them than just the "hired help". She mattered to them. (and those kids listened to her because of it) And they were important to her too. She was a huge part of their daily life and I loved that they all respected her for it. (including and especially Atticus) And it was a mutual respect.. she was a very reliable and trustworthy friend to him too... Not just an employee. She kept his home and she kept his kids safe and allowed him to be free from worry while he was away.

 

I imagine she would not have been nearly so "involved" with their lives if she has just been there as "the maid".

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> > Atticus shows no fear. When everyone comes to the jail cell I think he would have been enough to hold them off. What Scout said was really a tension breaker but he stands there resolute and unafraid. I think he still would have held them off.

>

> I don't know. I imagine you could be right, but I am glad it did not play out that way so we did not have to find out. I don't know if my heart could have taken it. (ha) I see your point that he was pretty much a "force to be reckoned with" just by his character and stature, etc... resolute is a good word for it. But I liked that her innocence ended up being the final straw in shaming them all and sending them back home. And I also liked how Jem stood up to his dad when he told him to leave. He seemed to understand too that their presence there with him was a way of keeping things from escalating. I think he really understood that his dad could be in serious danger if they left (And I also think he'd have lit into the first person who laid a finger on his dad, if given half a chance). He was a "protector" by nature, it seems to me. (I think it comes from being the oldest)

>

>

*To Kill a Mockingbird* is one of my favorite films, and I cry every time I see it. I really appreciate your comments, rohanaka, and filmlover, concerning what I considered one of the most important American films ever made.

 

As a public school instructor for many years, there are moments when I found that I had to "stand my ground" in order to maintain discipline and continue the flow of instruction uninterrupted. Those moments in *To Kill A Mockingbird* forced me to see the need for me as an educator to stand up to the bullies in the classroom and the administration. My struggle may not have been an important a one as Atticus', Jem's and Scout's, but those moments of strength on celluloid helped me in the real void...often a public school classroom, and I am grateful for that strength.

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Hello Miss Applegate,

 

My struggle may not have been an important a one as Atticus', Jem's and Scout's, but those moments of strength on celluloid helped me in the real void...often a public school classroom, and I am grateful for that strength.

 

Don't kid yourself. It was an important struggle.(and one that grows more important every day) As someone who had the pleasure of working around kids of a VARIETY of ages for many years (in the past) it is important to be strong... and also consistent.. and also REAL. Kids are smarter and way more perceptive than most people realize. And they tend to only rise to the level we expect from them,most of the time. Those who work with them and around them all day (especially in a school setting) are a huge influence in their lives... much greater than most people imagine.. even if you are only a small part of their day (as I was). Oh golly.. don't get me started, ha.

 

I guess what I am saying is that if you are "weak" and they see you are not really "up" to the challenge.. they will squash you like a bug.. ha. But if you can get their attention.. and show them that you really are interested in helping them succeed, and you are expecting them to do their best... most of them (not all, but most) will usually rise to the ocassion.. and THAT is a beautiful thing.

 

I really appreciate your comments

 

Thank you for saying that, ha.. but truthfully.. I am just a big blabbermouth. Give me a good movie with great characters and I start yammering all over the place, ha. It is a good thing Miss Goddess has given me such an easy location here in "Rambles" (what an appropriate name to call it, ha) so I can "plop down" and gab. :D I appreciate the way she (and others) put up w/ me. Once in a while I do shut up though and let others get a word in edgewise, ha. I like to hear what they have to say as much as I like to blab.

 

To Kill a Mockingbird is one of my favorite films, and I cry every time I see it.

 

It truly is just a wonderful story. What is your favorite part?

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The most frightening part for me was when Jem and Scout are running in the costumes when I was younger.

 

But I enjoy Brock Peter's moments on screen so much. They fill me with emotion.

 

But I think that those moments when Peck is standing up to everything and everybody in his

way, those are the moments that envelope me. I've been there in those kinds of situations.

Maybe not that critical, but certainly that much opposition.

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