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RAMBLES Part II


MissGoddess
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Nice and calm and civil.

 

That's just because there hasn't been any trouble from the Shadow Man, lately. ha.:D We haven't had us a good old fashioned knock down drag out in EVER so long. ha. Hey.. between him and that Mad Hat guy... we've been OVERDUE for a good hangin'. Maybe I better go check my rope supply just in case that "calm before the storm" wears off. Ha. :P

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*The other is Peck's exit from the courtroom. (I think that is LZ's favorite scene.)*

 

Yep, it is. Two scenes can make me well up and get teary eyed just thinking about them. This one and the other is in *Yellow Ribbon* when Capt. Brittles gets his shiny new watch.

 

Drat, I have to go get tissues.

 

The good news for me, Sam Jackson gets teary eyed talking about that scene with Atticus, so I am not alone!

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*MissG said* -

> Did you ever see the wonderful documentary about him, produced, I believe, by

> his daughter? There is one part that takes place during one of his public appearances,

> sort of a chance for him to answer questions from an audience and in this case, one

> of the audience members was the girl who played Scout. I think Peck shared that

> the author, Harper Lee, sent him her father's watch in tribute to his wonderful performance

> What a charming, captivating man he was in real life. And so darn handsome to the end

*rohanaka said* -

> I do not know much about his life, and to be honest.. I never really noticed his career much until about the last 25 years or so... I dont' know why... but he just never stood out much for me before that. But the way you have described him fits the impressions that I have of him now, for sure.

 

I saw Now Playing the Show for July, and Gregory Peck will be the star of the month (I'm pretty sure that's accurate) with many of his movies shown on Monday nights. I think they will also be showing the documentary MissG speaks of. I can never see too much of *Duel in the Sun*.

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Je suis ici!!!!! So don't try it, Bub!

 

Now Mann up Ollie. Can you recommend any Anthony Mann films for me to see:

 

http://www.filmforum.org/films/mann.html#625

 

I was going to see "The Naked Spur" and "Winchester 73" today, but an editing assignment that I must complete...and have been working on since last night got in the way, so I reluctantly had to cancel out a good time at the movies.

 

Drat!!! No.....double-drat. :-(

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Whooo, Darlin'... I tell ya, I'm not a fan of Westerns but some of those Mann westerns are better viewing than most.

 

BUT the crime-dramas - top-notch, every one of them. I watch and rewatch those all the time, any time. I like *DESPERATE* because it's a supporting-actors' film and - to me - proves the B-Actors and Support Crews were completely capable of carrying great stories, delivering strong performances. That Raymond Burr - I tell ya - how in the WORLD did the California Bar ever let him get his law-practice, much less all that TV time!

 

If you haven't seen *THE GREAT FLAMARION*, GOOD. I hate seeing you beauties gettng more lessons like There's No Fool Like An Old Man Fool. No wonder Erich took up butlering...

 

*HE WALKED BY NIGHT* is a favorite piece of work, too. It's hard to imagine Richard Basehart ever menacing anyone - much less everyone. But there he is... Whit Bissell... what a drip. He lets his sick sister infect New York City one year, and he's cowering to Richard Basehart the next... what is that guy thinkin' of?!! He needs to run around with Marshall Thompson sometime and go hang out in mid-town bars... they can play with the telephone maybe. Dial 1 1 something or other...ha ha

 

I've always liked *THE GLENN MILLER STORY*, but I've always liked his music. Give me a chance to listen to it, and I'll probably like any of those experiences. And *HEROES OF TELEMARK* is one of my very few Kirk Douglas favorites. It's been available in Europe on DVD for a while, but not here, Stateside. Darn... I think that's BP's fault, by the way.

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Hi MadHat...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GL4tVLiWFuk&feature=related

 

It's funny how with all the great stars, they got the chance to play that one great role that fits them

like a glove. No doubt, that was Atticus Finch for Peck. He was wonderful. AND played different types of characters good guys and bad guys, throughout his career. Very sad he's gone. Loved his performances. (And he was gorgeous to boot...that voice!) Sigh.

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I loved Gregory Peck, too. One of the kindest acts I ever heard about him committing is that he and his wife Veronique took in Ava Gardner's caretaker, Carmen Vargas, and pet Welsh Corgie, Morgan, after Ava passed in 1990.

 

A sweet, as well as a very talented man.

Annex-PeckGregory_15.jpg

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Hellllloooooooo Miss Goddess!!!

 

Wow. I am stopping in here for a moment to tell you that (ha) Sgt Rutledge did NOT get watched yet (but I WILL be taking care of that this evening, barring any unforseen circumstances, ha. NEVER let it be said that I left a challenge from the Grey Dude unanswered) ha.

 

But I have to tell you the REASON the dear Sergeant was yet again put on hold.... Thanks to AMC and their all weekend salute to my beloved DUKE, ha. And thanks to the QT being set on watching what I had been planning to TAPE so I could watch Sgt Rutledge instead.. I ended up going with The Wings of Eagles this afternoon.

 

OH MY GOLLY it has been a long time coming (for almost TWO years now) I have remembered your VERY excellent and splendid post on this film (posted elsewhere on the message board and LONG since buried) but I went in and looked it up as a refresher after watching the Duke and my sweet Maureen today.

 

And IF I may.. I'd like to FINALLY (finally) respond to some of your really thought provoking and well written words. (to make it more enjoyable for the folks to be able to read for themselves, I have take the liberty of copy and pasting some of your comments from the other thread in here)

 

LONG ago (in Nov of 2008 to be exact) Miss Goddess wrote:

 

Watching this movie helped me understand a little better the significance of the use of color cinematically. Ford uses a restricted "palette" so it was easy for me and specifically, I noticed how he uses the color blue in all its various hues. This is just my own opinion or interpretation, I don't say that any of this is what the director meant or implied. From what I've read in a couple of Ford biographies, blue is a color Ford generally uses sparingly in character wardrobe and when he does, it usually connotes something relative to "trueness" or goodness. I think it does so in Wings of Eagles, but that it also has a double significance: it also (along with white) represents the "Navy", Spig's other world---the world he is most comfortable in, the world that he most conforms to---and, as is inherent in the military, a world which demands conformity in order to function.

 

 

I saw it.. I saw exactly what you meant. It is a BLUE blue movie. But it is BEAUTIFULLY blue. And you are right about the feel it lends to the story and the characters too.

 

And your call here is RIGHT on the money:

 

The color significance of blue is most interesting in the character of "Min" (Maureen O'Hara), who to me is the "heart" of the movie, as the woman often is in a Ford film. She starts out wearing the loveliest, Spring-like shade of Perriwinkle. The contrast with her red hair takes your breath away. She also is seen in white and only occasionally in navy-and-white. However, by the end of the movie, she has begun to wear the darkest shade of blue, Navy Blue. Navy blue is Spig's usual color, in an out of uniform, and it's now surrounding Min, just as The Navy does. In a crucial and climactic scene between them they are virtually identically dressed: in Navy and white suits. In "uniform"---which may denote conformity

 

Oh my word. Was she ever beautiful in this film. And yet to me, this was one of her most "un-beautiful" characters ever. You get to see her flaws and all. In fact.. you view both him and her that way. (and I am speaking of their inward failing more than any outward flaws) That to me was one of the most obvious things about her.. (especially when she was wearing the navy and white) CRISP clean, flawless in appearance... even her hair is TOTALLY perfect.. and yet.. inside.. wounded, and very much broken. What a contrast.

 

Min's defeat, the Navy has won. But she goes down fighting, throwing off the navy jacket

 

It was almost as if she could barely stand the thought of it (the jacket) on her back anymore.

 

But going back to the parallel meaning of "blue", which is truth, in the most honest moments Spig and Min share, Spig is wearing blue and in one scene, there are even blue flowers before them, "witnessing" their exchange. The color is at its most bittersweet and ambivalent in Spig's rhapsodic daydream of his past good times with Min, starting when he unfolds the vibrant blue folio with their pictures---notice in the "memory" how the Navy has still claimed Spig for her own and even Maureen is dressed in his favorite uniform

 

That for me was one of the best moments in the entire film. I loved him looking back on his family and his life with them (all too brief as it was) and reflecting on what TRULY was the best part of the entire journey he'd been on for so long.

 

I also want to mention Maureen's extraordinary acting and then I'll have done with the subject until others have seen it or wish to comment. I think Maureen's performance in The Wings of Eagles is one of the greatest overlooked performances in all of movies. And one reason why is that she had to play most of her toughest scenes to no one but the camera (or perhaps to the director sitting, as he customarily did, just under or next to the camera). Ford so very interestingly places the actors and the camera in a way no one else would I'm sure of it. And he does so to tell us something about the characters of Spig Wead and his wife, Min. In most of Spig's scenes, he is not facing the camera (us---the audience), but slightly angled or in profile, on his stomach in the bed or even with his back to the camera. Min, in contrast, is often placed squarely in front of the lens, facing us---compelling us---directly. It's as if Ford is saying look at her, look at Min and pay attention. It also seems to say she is naked and honest about her emotions and Spig is hiding from them or denying them. It's extraordinary when I think of what if must have entailed for Maureen to pull what she had to out of herself and her ability to play such anguished emotions (there are several scenes like that) directly facing a machine and not being able to look at a human face (unless it was Ford's). That is TOUGH WORK in case y'all don't realise it. It's hard enough in a two-shot when you can feed off of your partner's response but when you are isolated--- and the positions also indicate isolation to me---it can be terrifying. And you can see her terror in her eyes, it works so perfectly for the character!! I don't think I ever truly esteemed her gifts as much as I should until I really looked hard at this film.

 

Beautifully said, little darlin'. I have always admired Ms O'Hara and her acting talent. But you are rigth.. this is likely one of her very finest films (in terms of showing her depth as an actress and her ability to truly draw you into her heart by the way she expresses her emotions. You can feel the gutwrenching frustration and sadness, and loneliness.. and anger. OH me.

 

You know.. one of the things that the QT and I both commented on was how "unlikable" we found these two people to be. Usually, you just fall in love with the sorts of characters that you find Duke and Maureen playing (when they are together in a film) That is not to say that I found the movie unlikable. Quite the opposite. But I don't think these two people were MEANT to be liked (in that way) I think the story was what it was. There was a LOT to admire about both of them.. but in terms of "liking" who they were as people.. I found it very hard. (especially just before and directly after the accident)

 

This truly is an unusual Ford film (compared to many of his others) with regard to family, anyway. (although there were plenty of other "Fordie" moments to be found. The patriotism and the respect for the military.. and the "brawling" for sport were all there for sure. But the family roles were all out of whack in this film. Very unsual.

 

I told the QT that if he EVER (ever, ever) were in a bed like that he would not need his old navy buddy to come in there and tell him to move his toe. ha. I would be there kicking his behind until he moved it. ha. The Navy buddy could just be there for moral support. ha. And THAT to me is the saddest part of this story. The way they BOTH gave up on one another so easily. They obviously loved one another.. but they just did not have enough strength (for two such stubborn characters) to be strong TOGETHER when it really counted. (like when "the Commodore" died.. or when Spig had to move away... she should have gone with him.. those little girls were ROBBED of knowing their daddy by stubborn pride... OH, don't get me started, ha. What a sad story of wasted love and opportunity for happiness.

 

But the worst of it all was when he drove her away (in the hospital)... and she went. I looked over at the QT and told him, (in no uncertain terms) "You can't get rid of me that easily". (and of course, ha.. he said.. " I know. You are like a bad penny, you'd just keep turning back up") THAT's my QT!!! (ha)

 

Somehow Daily was always so aggressive and even obnoxious before but Pappy softens him up and makes him almost puppy-ish---and immensely likable. I was extremely touched by his portrayal of "Jughead", the man who saw it all and tried in his way to play "cupid" between his best friend and his wife, who saw Spig's faults but tried to protect him from the inevitable result of his selfishness. And got no thanks for it.

 

OH I think dear Jughead was my most favorite character in the whole entire story. What a friend. (even when overlooked... the way he turned up in that Taxi... sigh) He truly was ALWAYS there as a friend in need. He was a great character.

 

Thanks again, so very much, Miss G for drawing attention to this film for me. (even though it has taken me a couple of years to finally get to it, ha) I can't honestly say this is my favorite Fordie... not by a long shot.. but still a very good film and very compelling story. Very much worth watching. (And I think I mentioned this way back years ago when you made your first post.. you should have that thing published in a movie magazine.... VERY thought provoking comments about a what I am sure is a too often overlooked film.

 

And now.. I MUST go see about that Sgt Rutledge.... NEVER let it be said that old Shiftless got the better of ME! Ha.

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I will reply to your wonderful post in full soon, Ro. I just want to say how flattered I am you actually went to the trouble to find and drag out that long winded monologue I wrote ages ago! Oh wow, I still haven't learned to say things in a succinct fashion, lol.

 

Most of all I'm glad you got to see the movie. It is a thorny film---it is not a whitewashed biography of Frank Wead, which is all the more interesting considering Ford was his friend and insisted on making the movie before anyone else tried to do the story of the man. I think, personally, it's because Ford may have seen much of his own marriage and self in Frank's story. He wanted to tell the truth, but also to give us a chance to understand and, hopefully, not to judge. I think it's one of the most remarkable and unusual films he ever made. Glad you got to it, and now I hope you're on to the Trial of Sergeant Rutledge (which is not nearly so fine a film, but Woody is magnificent).

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I just want to say how flattered I am you actually went to the trouble to find and drag out that long winded monologue I wrote ages ago! Oh wow, I still haven't learned to say things in a succinct fashion, lol.

 

Oh golly, girl. It was VERY rememberable and NOT at all "long winded". It truly has been in the back of my mind ever since I read it and it has kept me looking forward to the chance to see the film for that long too.

 

It is a thorny film---it is not a whitewashed biography of Frank Wead, which is all the more interesting considering Ford was his friend and insisted on making the movie before anyone else tried to do the story of the man. I think, personally, it's because Ford may have seen much of his own marriage and self in Frank's story. He wanted to tell the truth, but also to give us a chance to understand and, hopefully, not to judge. I think it's one of the most remarkable and unusual films he ever made.

 

It is all that and more. Nicely said, youngun. (and ha... I also wanted to mention earlier and forgot.. WHAT about that Wardie Bond.. ha. I LOVED his send up of "Pappy". That put a huge smile on my face the minute he put on those glasses. LOVED it. ha.)

 

I will look forward to hearing more from you on this film (if you are so inclined) and also.. IF you have the time and want to post any of them.. those screencaps from your original post were GORGEOUS. I almost "swiped" a couple to repost here.. ha. But did not want to be a "cap thief" ha.

 

Ok.. off to see the Sergeant.. no really.. I mean it.. Honest... this time I'm really going. REALLY! ha!! :D

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I really loved what you had to say, Ro. In fact, I'm going to say that this is one of my favorite posts you've ever written..... along with MissG's, because you did not pull any punches.

 

The thing that got me all tied up in knots over this movie was that "unlikable" thing you so succinctly put your finger on. I could not for the life of me understand this film because of that. I was not expecting it, and so I couldn't understand it. But in going back to the movie again, I find a huge amount of "real" in those characters and their situation. Because his disability is not really the story here. It's their disability - their marriage, and how it doesn't function. At all. And that to me is a heartbreaking, but very real situation. Because of their personalities, neither one is able to really be the person the other one needs.

 

I also love Dan Dailey here. Just the way he is filmed - coming in, every day. Making every day a new and exciting one, but still coming....every day.

 

Anyway, I loved your thoughts on the film.

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Hello, Ro

 

> Oh golly, girl. It was VERY rememberable and NOT at all "long winded". It truly has been in the back of my mind ever since I read it and it has kept me looking forward to the chance to see the film for that long too.

>

 

You're very kind. Kindness is in short supply on this board.

 

> It is all that and more. Nicely said, youngun. (and ha... I also wanted to mention earlier and forgot.. WHAT about that Wardie Bond.. ha. I LOVED his send up of "Pappy". That put a huge smile on my face the minute he put on those glasses. LOVED it. ha.)

>

 

:) "John Dodge". Ha. Great name. Those are all Ford's things in the office, there.

 

WingsofEagles-directorstars.jpg

 

 

> I will look forward to hearing more from you on this film (if you are so inclined) and also.. IF you have the time and want to post any of them.. those screencaps from your original post were GORGEOUS. I almost "swiped" a couple to repost here.. ha. But did not want to be a "cap thief" ha.

>

 

I'll try to reply as soon as I can acquire the energy. I was out most of yesterday and have a lot of catching up to do.

 

> Ok.. off to see the Sergeant.. no really.. I mean it.. Honest... this time I'm really going. REALLY! ha!! :D

 

Now that's one discussion I look forward to!

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you did not pull any punches

 

Thanks Jackie... I am really glad I got to see this film (after such a long wait)

 

I find a huge amount of "real" in those characters and their situation. Because his disability is not really the story here. It's their disability - their marriage

 

That's it exactly. And you are right. It is heartbreaking. (but also, for some, very real) It was a sad commentary on what can happen in a marriage when two people focus more on what they want to have or be for themselves than on what they want to give or to be for each other. One should never feel like they have to totally lose all of who they are in a marriage to make it work.. but both people (over time) have to be willing to put the "me" aside and focus on the "we" if things are ever going to prosper. When it works.. it is a BEAUTIFUL thing.. but when it fails.. very sad.

 

I also love Dan Dailey here. Just the way he is filmed - coming in, every day. Making every day a new and exciting one, but still coming....every day

 

He truly was "a friend in need". My favorite scenes for him were in the hospital. I hate to think where Spig would have ended up w/out him.

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Hello there Miss G...

 

"John Dodge". Ha. Great name. Those are all Ford's things in the office, there

 

Ha... I wondered if they were. (loved the little stagecoach on his desk). If anything (given all the things you have ever told me about Ford and his personality) I think Bond likely "underplayed" him. ha. (Not loud enough.. ha) But still a VERY fun surprise to see him in the film like that.

 

I'll try to reply as soon as I can acquire the energy. I was out most of yesterday and have a lot of catching up to do

 

No hurry, little gal. Hope you get a chance to relax some today. :-)

 

Kindness is in short supply on this board

 

Is it just me... or do you smell excelsior burning???? :-)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

 

> That's it exactly. And you are right. It is heartbreaking. (but also, for some, very real) It was a sad commentary on what can happen in a marriage when two people focus more on what they want to have or be for themselves than on what they want to give or to be for each other. One should never feel like they have to totally lose all of who they are in a marriage to make it work.. but both people (over time) have to be willing to put the "me" aside and focus on the "we" if things are ever going to prosper. When it works.. it is a BEAUTIFUL thing.. but when it fails.. very sad.

 

Sometimes the two inside the marriage are too close to see what they really need. There is just not enough man or woman to go around.... I feel this way sometimes - that I give everything to my daughter, and our home, and my father and..... and there is nothing left over for Andrew. And he is busy with his work, which is very important to him, and his mom needs him quite often so i barely see him, it seems like. There are tons of stresses on a marriage without the difficulty caused by war, and disability. These two certainly didn't lack love. And I don't think they were selfish exactly...... it was almost like, what was good for one was the worst for the other, and vice versa.

 

> I also love Dan Dailey here. Just the way he is filmed - coming in, every day. Making every day a new and exciting one, but still coming....every day

>

> He truly was "a friend in need". My favorite scenes for him were in the hospital. I hate to think where Spig would have ended up w/out him.

 

He was exactly what was needed. Spig and his wife were so busy thinking for each other, thinking they were giving each other their space, that it just turned out all wrong.

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These two certainly didn't lack love. And I don't think they were selfish exactly...... it was almost like, what was good for one was the worst for the other, and vice versa.

 

That is a great way to say it. I think Miss G had it right in her original posts too.. the Navy really owned Spig (or he let it be first place at least) His family was a high price to pay for it, though. I just wish we could have gotten to see both of them take a different perspective as in... instead of pushing one another away... saying "all these things may be working against us, but you can't get rid of me that easily".

 

Again... very sad.

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Jul 5, 2010 12:52 PM

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I may not chime in here very often, but I do enjoy reading all the insights and discussions on the "historic" Rambles II thread.

 

Rohanaka, that archaelogy on MissG's brilliant concepts, and your own insight is pure inspiration. I enjoyed the film *Wings of Eagles*, on many levels, the Maureen/Duke chemistry, the story itself, the self-deprecation, and the anxiety that one spouse endures during a major health crisis of a partner. My Mom was handicapped to a certain degree, and this film helped me find a window into my parents struggles, but they were more Walter and Hildy in their discussions about anything, and seemed much more uplifting in their approach to difficulties than the couple portrayed by the Duke and the Queen of Technicolor in *Wings of Eagles*.

 

Jackie, I think you certainly make some viable points, yourself!

 

The discussion here reminded me of an article I'd read on the virtual highway:

http://www.kinexis.com/moviesseivom/WingsOfEagles.html

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Hello Miss Applegate,

 

that archaelogy on MissG's brilliant concepts, and your own insight is pure inspiration

 

Thanks, but I owe it ALL to Miss G. She was the motivating force for me. Duke and O'hara fan that I am I still may not have sought out this film if she had not drawn attention to it for me.

 

And thanks for sharing the comments about your folks. I imagine that does lend an extra perpective to that story for you.

 

(I will have to check out the article you added in your link later, but just from the first part I read, it looks like a good read)

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I had not seen this movie in over forty years and was delighted to get to see it again this week-end. It turned out to be like seeing it for the first time as it was so different from what I remembered.

 

I thought it was more like a comedy as back in the 60's it seemed more amusing than scary. I liked the closeness of the family and the boy's willingness to protect them while he solved the mystery. I wasn't sure if the housekeeper was a witch or not-yes I know it was Margaret Hamilton-and who would have suspected good old Martin Milner was the real villain. I felt sorry for the ghosts though; they needed that 13th one but deserved better than him.

 

I hope it's not another 40 odd years until the next time. Oh, wait; I'll be one by then.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Roha wrote the comment about MissG *I still may not have sought out this film if she had not drawn attention to it for me...* and I know exactly what you mean.

 

I think this is why Forums have a huge advantage over traditional "film reviews" because there IS rambling and the naming of other impressive films among our good writers give us a chance for a perspective, for a comparative analysis.

 

I just hate all the good films YOU have brought to my attention, too, though, and forced ME into watching them. Ya know how I HATE watching good movies! ha ha... "A fate worse than death!" Ah yes... the briar-patch of Brer MovieFan.

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