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There are similarities between Leslie Benedict and the girl in A Place in the Sun, so

you may like Giant better for that. Both are privileged daughters of the rich, but

with hearts and minds of their own that they give away to men not from their world.

 

The long scene between Elizabeth and James Dean, when he makes tea for her,

is something to see. I think it's Dean's best screen moment.

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There are similarities between Leslie Benedict and the girl in A Place in the Sun, so

you may like Giant better for that. Both are privileged daughters of the rich, but

with hearts and minds of their own that they give away to men not from their world.

 

Elizabeth is very much on the lovely side in A Place in the Sun, but I do like hearing the feisty side is present in Giant.

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Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

 

Oh I'm scared. You might say Marilyn doesn't do anything for you either...and that would be too much for this Cine-Maven. You'll truly make me lose my faith in men.

 

Edited by: CineMaven on Aug 22, 2010 5:07 PM...classic film loving men, that is.

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> Truthfully.. I meant what I said about only JUST tolerating her in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, ha... she just spent way too much time running around in her slip and I kept thinking.. for crying out loud.. finish getting dressed and THEN yell at Paul Newman some more.. ugh. But THAT is likely a strictly female opinion.. ha.

 

I perhaps should not say this in forum where men are present but those here seem like good guys and I hope they will agree to keep it to themselves.

 

Young women of certain class in that time were taught many things about being high lady. This went far beyond which fork to use or to hold pinkie out while sipping tea. Very important secret lesson is: less you have on = less men will argue with you. Her wearing slip shows artfulness in being lady. He could be in full fight mode if she wore dress. He would not hear anything she said if she wore nothing. By wearing slip she has weakened his defenses without making him so distracted that her words could not hurt him.

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Very important secret lesson is: less you have on = less men will argue with you. Her wearing slip shows artfulness in being lady. He could be in full fight mode if she wore dress. He would not hear anything she said if she wore nothing. By wearing slip she has weakened his defenses without making him so distracted that her words could not hurt him.

 

Awesome! I never, ever thought of something like that! Darn you women and your intelligence!

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SansFin -

 

You strike me as a VERY intelligent woman. I think you need to write down everything you know in book form, and send it to me immediately . :D

 

Miss G - I agree about the James Dean scene in *Giant*. It's absolutely great.

 

I'm sending some help for you, on that mountaintop, Ro. Sometimes you meet the loveliest people there -

 

Photobucket

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Oh Jackaaaaaay, have a heart. Give Ro 'one boy...one special boy...one boy to cling to...forever and ever.' Someone like ohhhhhhhh saaaaaaay, Olivier in "Wuthering Heights." Brooding, sullen, heartbroken. He'll be on the rebound which might make for some interesting...conversation, for Rohanaka up there on those cold, wintry, mountaintops.

 

Jean Simmons...beautiful (especially in "Spartacus"). Joan Bennett...whoa!!! Gorgeous. Best thing she ever did was to become a brunette. I would list Hedy Lamarr as my favorite brunette...but I've already caused enough bru(nette)-haha with my Elizabeth Taylor talk. (I love ya Liz, even if I am a girl)!! So let me say my brunette of all brunettes in the Kingdom of Brunettes is Ava Gardner. (You know I don't know how to post pictures so would you just use your imagination...or please post an Ava of your choosing; saaay in "Pandora & the Flying Dutchman"?) Oh and Jean Peters is an un-

believable second.

 

Frankie...you're redeeming yourself with Marilyn.

 

Edited by: CineMaven on Aug 22, 2010 7:10 PM...SansFin, why are you giving away our secrets? You know your husband reads this Message Board!! :-)

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> You strike me as a VERY intelligent woman. I think you need to write down everything you know in book form, and send it to me immediately . :D

 

Thank you very much but it is not from me.

 

In old days women's clothes were her armor and honor. Respectable men felt instinctive need to protect any woman who was defenseless because she was not fully dressed.

 

My great grand mother told of time she had been impertinent in public. She was told someone from Court would call on her. She knew she would be severely chastised. When such things went badly it could mean economic ruin of her father. She feigned an indisposition and received him in her dressing gown. Surely man of his breeding and position had been in many ladies's bedrooms and seen their clothes in disarray but he treated her with great respect and stated reason for his visit was out of concern for her health although he could not have known of any illness before arriving. His only allusion to her impertinence was single raised eyebrow and 'Yesterday?' said softly. She said she cringed and frowned and began to actually cry. He did not let her apologize. He patted her hand and left. Nothing was ever again said about incident. She was sure meeting would have gone far differently if she had been properly dressed and met him in parlor.

 

She passed away when I was four but I remember many things she told me about being high lady. Our family were not noble but had high standing and were respectable. I see in movies about Old South many things that seem like world she lived in.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> SansFin, why are you giving away our secrets? You know your husband reads this Message Board!![/b] :-)

 

I believe it is safe enough. Men no longer have high standards which make that particular --ruse-- fragility effective.

 

I am very sad to say I do not yet have husband. There is problem with certificates and INS. It is as long and complicated as first time we wished to be married. It looks as if it will be best if we wait until I become naturalized citizen and then become married. At least we are together. We are not together today because he is in hospital again and I can not visit because of infection but we are together most days and that is what is important.

 

But capuchin already knows not to aruge with me when I am naked. :)

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Your great grandmother was a VERY wise lady, SansFin. She reminds me of some of

my mother's relatives. I love to absorb their wisdom and file it away for future

reference. Wonderful story, thank you for sharing it with us!

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I never, ever thought of something like that! Darn you women and your intelligence!

 

It is merely turning tables. Men thought women were helpless little things which could not stand up for themselves. Women had to use those thoughts against them to make them listen.

 

Enlightened men have nothing to fear from such things. Surely you can argue with woman in bikini as much as with man wearing boxers.

 

Or could you? ;)

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> ELIZABETH TAYLOR'S day under the stars will be Monday on TCM.

>

> Her beauty...undeniable. And I find her to be a talented actress. For me the criteria is "do I be-

> lieve her?" and more often than not, I do. But there might be other reasons to check out Elizabeth Taylor's films on August 23rd. I know there are William Powell and Donald Crisp fans out there. Me, I'm a sucker for Don Taylor, as I recently confessed in our "Actors We Find Flutter-Worthy" discussion. For campy fun (that sounds like fodder for you Bronxgirl) there's "Butterfield 8" which

> I never laugh at, but I may be prompted to, if Bronxie leads the way. (Love her stilettoes!)

>

> Some may want to see the 'before' and 'after' Monty, so you have both Clift's pairings with Elizabeth Taylor. I'd recommend seeing "A Place in the Sun" for the umpteenth time (not

> you Grimesy; I think you might have socks to darn or something). George Stevens' direc-

> tion in Filmmaking 101; classic storytelling of a tale of a man who the Fates were against.

> (Awww hell, who doesn't want to just drown in the beauty of Taylor and Clift...oooh, no pun

> intended).

>

> Some of us gals love our Aussie heart throb, Rod Taylor...so we can get an eyeful of him if we want. And "The V.I.P.s" is one of the movies I remember my family seeing in the theatres. Me and seven other people were the only ones to see "X, Y and Zee" in the theatres. It didn't do good box

> office, if I recall correctly, but I did like the triangle aspect of the story...and Taylor was such a beeeeyotch in this film. (What becomes a legend most? Play a beeeeyotch and find out). Besides, after Julie Christie, I've always liked Susannah York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't find BUTTERFIELD 8 campy fun at all, in fact, it's kind of a drag, ha! (even Liz thought so) What I'm really looking forward to is X Y & Z, which I saw years ago, and couldn't believe what I was watching, especially a particular scene with Taylor and York. (who I also like) If I remember correctly (though I've probably blocked a lot of this film from my mind) Liz is trying to get back at Michael Caine, and does so in a very interesting way.

 

Wasn't Suzannah also in THE KILLING OF SISTER GEORGE?

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