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cteddiesgirl

Having trouble recording to dvd.

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Primosprimos,

 

When I responded to yesterday?s post I assumed that you had attempted to use the 2160 RF output to the TV. Very few DVD or HDD/DVD recorders have modulated RF outputs that support that connectivity. It?s usually the combo recorders, like the analog tuner DMR-ES35V, that have modulated RF outputs that support that connectivity. I believe that all current DVD recorders must be connected to a TV through composite, component or HDMI outputs. Very few current TVs have S-Video inputs.

 

The Magnavox 2160 default Auto Clock setting is ?ON.? With that setting the Magnavox 2160 will power itself up twice a day, just before noon and midnight, in order to search channels for a time signal. Due to the many rogue time signals many, or most users (including me) turn this ?feature? OFF. I set the clock manually as well. Another problem comes with the Daylight Savings Time setting. Again I turn this feature OFF. Philips/Magnavox newbies are constantly reporting their frustrations with these default settings.

 

It?s a learning experience for a long-time Panasonic owner transitioning to Philips and Magnavox HDD/DVD recorders. I?ve made that transition beginning in April 2008, but, to this day, I still consider myself an entry-level user. The Owner?s Manual is daunting but Wajo?s sticky thread is the best way to learn to use these products. The Owners Manual doesn?t even address front and end cut editing?but Wajo does. There are other instances where the Owner?s Manual is just plain wrong?but Wajo provides the correctives. Go to Wajo?s table of contents and begin your 2160 journey there.

 

The 2160 is a great recorder. Unfortunately there are frequent production line Quality Control problems reported with new 2160 models purchased through walmart.com. Actually, I?ve purchased five 2160 models. My first one had a non-functional DVD Drive and was returned to a local WalMart store within a few days. (Later AVS discussions pointed to a DVD Drive data cable that might not have been connected during production?a commonly reported quality control failure.) I ordered another 2160 a day or two after returning the first example. That second new 2160 has been an outstanding performer.

 

Since that time I?ve purchased three more 2160 models, all of them like-new, factory refurbished by Funai, and sold through jr.com in NYC. All these 2160 models are outstanding performers.

 

Once these 2160 ?refurbs? come back into stock at jr.com I expect to buy one or two more, check them out, and then put them away for future use. I?m that sold on the Magnavox 2160--even though seven of my Panasonics are still in daily use and another eight Panasonics are set aside as standby recorders.

 

After my experiences with five 2007 and newer EZ series Panasonics I no longer purchase current EZ series recorders. Failing or failed EZ series recorders are replaced with older ES series recorders or, you guessed it, a Magnavox 2160.

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Primosprimos,

 

The Magnavox H2160MW9A has a bug related to the hard drive automatic recording buffer. This bug thwarts certain DVD Drive disc operations when scheduled recordings have been programmed.

 

Temporarily selecting L3 with the remote control's SOURCE button disables the recording buffer allowing the disc operations to be performed. After performing the DVD Drive disc operations the SOURCE setting may be returned to the original setting.

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talkietime, I read and re-read your notes, and even read them out loud to DH, and then we decided to return the unit to a local Walmart. Sorry, it just seemed too intense for both of us.

 

Cowardly, I have ordered (three strikes and it will be out for me) from Amazon, which is wonderful about returns, another VHS/DVD converter thingy. Specifically, a Sony RDR-VX560 1080p Tunerless DVD Recorder/VHS Combo Player.

 

Thanks to you (and Web) for all your assistance.

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I hate to bring up such an old thread, but I'm suddenly having this problem again with TCM. I'm no longer able to record anything from TCM to a dvd to watch later. :(

 

I anyone else having this problem too?

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If you can record from other channels, then I suspect your cable company is one of the ones has added a copyguard to their signal for TCM.

Do you get any kind of on-screen message? Or do you get a black screen or mangled picture with a soundtrack on thye recording?

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When I try to record something from TCM, I get a message box stating that I cannot record.

 

The funny thing is that for a long time I couldn't record anything from the Disney channel. Now I can record a few things from there, but nothing from TCM which I used to be able to record anything.

 

I don't get why any cable company would do this when it's not requested by the actual channel providers.

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Maybe you can call your cable company and ask to speak to a technician, then ask him why you can?t record TCM.

 

If your cable company is the one that?s blocking it, tell them you?ll switch over to a satellite service such as Directv, which allows the recording of TCM. Anyone can switch from local cable to national satellite, as long as you can put a small dish on a post in your yard or attach it to your house or apartment, facing Southeast.

 

Almost all my recordings have been made on tape, then I dubbed them over to DVD with no problem. But my Panasonic is about 5 years old now.

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Fred, don't you find the taping from VHS to DVD to be unnecessary and time consuming? Doesn't it also affect video quality? I have a simple DVD recorder that will record anything. If this thing clunks out on me, I'm more likely going to get the same model because I have no desire to have a "newer" unit with the copy protection software. At $160 a month for cable I think I pay for the right to make private copies of films or TV for my own viewing outside of them being broadcast.

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> {quote:title=LoveFilmNoir wrote:}{quote}

> Fred, don't you find the taping from VHS to DVD to be unnecessary and time consuming? Doesn't it also affect video quality?

 

There is a slight loss of quality, but the quality is so good, when compared to old movies that were shown on TV just 10 to 15 years ago, it doesn?t bother me.

 

Some of these old films have been so well restored in recent years, they look just like I saw them on the big theater screen originally.

 

I used to try to record directly to DVD, but I make a lot of timing mistakes and channel mistakes, so a full tape might have only one or two good movies on it, with a lot of false starts, wrong channels, wrong movies, etc. :) So, by dubbing the actual movies from tape to DVD, then my DVDs have only good clean old movies on them and not other junk.

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Fred, you need a DVD recorder with a hard drive. It holds hours of recordings, and you can edit out the non-movie heads and tails before you burn to DVD, and put chapter marks wherever you want them. The only one still made is a Magnavox, sold on line only, by Walmart.

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FredC, I say go with ValentineXavier's advice just do your research on which models may give you trouble with copyright protection.

 

I actually record to my DirecTV DVR and then I record from DVR to DVD Recorder as I watch the films. I have a tunerless recorder, and this way is also somewhat time consuming but with the rare titles, I get to come home from work and record them for my personal library while I watch it and when the recording is done, I can archive the DVD. From what I was told, having a DVR and a DVD recorder with a hard drive is pointless.

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> {quote:title=LoveFilmNoir wrote:}{quote}

> FredC, I say go with ValentineXavier's advice just do your research on which models may give you trouble with copyright protection.

 

The only HDD model in production, the Magnavox, is not known to have copy protection issues. That is, it doesn't find it when it doesn't exist, like some DVD recorders do. But, if the CPRM is there, it won't record.

 

> From what I was told having a DVR and a DVD recorder with a hard drive is pointless.

 

I'd say not so! I have two 250GB DVRs, and one 160GB DVDR (DVD recorder.) If you don't want to make DVDs, having just a DVR is fine. But, if you do want to make DVDs, having a DVR to feed your DVDR is very useful, especially if you want to record things from premium channels, digital channels, more than one thing at a time, watch one thing, while recording another... I set up movies to transfer from the DVR to the DVDR when I go to bed, or go to work, or just out for a while. When I come back, the movie is on the DVDR, ready to edit, and burn to disc.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

>

> I'd say not so! I have two 250GB DVRs, and one 160GB DVDR (DVD recorder.) If you don't want to make DVDs, having just a DVR is fine. But, if you do want to make DVDs, having a DVR to feed your DVDR is very useful, especially if you want to record things from premium channels, digital channels, more than one thing at a time, watch one thing, while recording another... I set up movies to transfer from the DVR to the DVDR when I go to bed, or go to work, or just out for a while. When I come back, the movie is on the DVDR, ready to edit, and burn to disc.

 

Looks like I'll be on the hunt for a second unit with a hard drive for the other room.

 

FredC, I agree about image quality of some of these restored classics. Some are actually cleaner than 70s and 80s films.

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*do your research on which models may give you trouble with copyright protection.*

I might be wrong, but I was under the impression that all DVD recorders had the copyguard detection software in place. Itw as part of the agreement whereby the movie studios allowed the machines to be made available at the home use level.

If you know someone capable of such re-monkeying, the software can be disabled. There are also several little boxes (I call them Veeblefetzers) available that defeat the copyguard in most cases.

It is also my understanding that local cable companies aren't "adding" the CG but are rather "allowing" it. That is, it is added by the provider (in this case TCM) but some cable companies might not choose to broadcast that part of the signal. As to why TCM has decided to block home recording of their broadcasts: well, you might notice that Robert Osborne is more frequently holding up DVD boxes & plugging same or the Movies Unlimited catalogue...

And I'll also note that I don't think putting the material on a VHS tape or a DVR prior to transferring it to DVDR is a work-around. I have several home-recorded tapes that looked/played fine, but wouldn't transfer to DVDR because the tape copied the CG as well.

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Harry, I use a Toshiba DR410 DVD Recorder. I guarantee you it is nothing fancy and under $100. I am able to record anything from DirecTV and I have not bugged the recorder at all. I record from my DVR box to the DVD recorder. What was the purpose of VHS 20+ years ago and what is the purchase of DVD today if a person can't make personal copies of their favorite programs and movies? I don't think Robert Osborne's DVD plugs are a part of TCM blocking their recordings, I think the movie studios have paid to have a certain amount of advertisements to get the message out there that a particular movie or box set is now available. TCM knows how rare some of the films they show are. While they may speak to the studios and encourage them to release a few rare gems to DVD, I'm sure they are aware people will set their recorders to record a film that is aired once every blue moon.

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*Here is the text from one of my recent posts in another forum:*

 

?Earlier posts in this and other forums have bemoaned copy protection difficulties with some Toshiba DVD Recorders. I?ve now experienced this Toshiba DVD Recorder copy protection pain for myself.

 

?This Toshiba D-R410 DVD Recorder of October 2008 manufacture is a Craig?s List purchase ($30) from a month ago. Since that time it has not been set up for regular use. Yesterday I set this D-R410 up (for the first time) for the specific purpose of playing a six minute long portion of a Panasonic-recorded DVD through the 410 model?s composite output to the front panel composite input of my Philips 3575 HDD/DVD Recorder in order to dub that recording to the 3575 model?s hard drive. That Philips hard drive recording was then found to have the ?copy protected? icon?the first time I?ve ever seen that icon with any of my Philips and Magnavox HDD/DVD recorders.

 

?Here is the background. Recently, TCM has been showing a six minute long ?TCM Original Production? promo describing the 1999 restoration of Greed (1924). This promo is especially interesting in that Josef Von Stroheim, son of Greed Director Erich Von Stroheim, participates in the promo. In the run-up to TCM?s showing of the restored version of Greed I?ve twice recorded this promo, both times with Panasonic DVD Recorders. When TCM screened the 1999 restored version of Greed I recorded it to the hard drive of my Philips 3575 HDD/DVD Recorder. Greed and two short interstitials were recorded as a single title of 4:30 duration at the LP recording mode. My recording strategy took into account title dividing, including the two short interstitials as well as dividing Greed into two parts for the purpose of high-speed dubbing to two DVDs. I used the LP recording mode (that provides 3:20:00 programming content per DVD with high-speed dubbing with Magnavox and Philips recorders) since I was unsure where the Greed title divide could be made in such a way as to preserve scene continuity. As it turned out I found the best title divide location occurred at 2:26:09. That left part two with a running time of 1:32:43. Since the TCM Greed screening lacked an intro, I determined to dub the six minute long Greed promo from a Panasonic-recorded disc to the 3575 model?s hard drive so the promo itself could be made to serve as the intro to part one.

 

?It was at this point that the Toshiba D-R410 was set up. The promo was played from the Panasonic-recorded DVD by the 410 and recorded to the 3575 hard drive but the result was that the hard drive recording had the copy protected icon. Yes, I made an attempt to copy the promo to a blank DVD. That was not possible.

 

?What did I do? I took that very same Panasonic-recorded DVD with the Greed promo and played it on a Sony DVP-NS57P DVD player where the composite output was connected to a Magnavox 2160A HDD/DVD Recorder. The Greed promo was dubbed to the 2160A hard drive where there was no copy protected icon found on that hard drive recording. Then I high-speed dubbed the Greed promo to a blank Taiyo Yuden DVD. Then I took that 2160A disc to the Philips 3575 where part one of Greed was then high-speed dubbed. Then I finalized that disc. Success!

 

?Part two of Greed was high-speed dubbed to another DVD where it was paired with an earlier showing of the 1925 MGM Studio Tour. Erich Von Stroheim is seen in that 32:17 minute studio tour.?

 

*Another poster responded:*

 

"OK, all that makes my head hurt. All that is way beyond whatever I would be able to do.

 

"I still haven't bought a new DVD recorder though I really need to because a whole bunch of TCM films are clogging up my DVR. I'd really like to get one with a VCR port too but I don't know if that's possible anymore. But I need to make sure it doesn't have any anti-copying software."

 

*My response to that poster:*

 

"My lengthy description addresses some of the concerns of those interested in "workarounds" to the "copy protected" issue with some recorders. It comes down to the reality that some devices "flag" programming as "copy protected" in order to prevent copying to removable media (DVD) while other devices do not flag programming as "copy protected."

 

"The concern you will have when considering the purchase of a HDD/DVD recorder or DVD recorder is this: Does your DVR "flag" it's output signal as "copy protected" so that a HDD/DVD recorder or DVD recorder might not be able to produce a DVD from a DVR output? I can not answer that question.

 

"My post merely confirms what some other Toshiba (and Sony) owners have found."

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Recently in my cable service the copy-protect signal began defeating attempts to record directly from FMC (as has been noted in another thread). I suggest that you re-read HarryLong's comments below about that "veeblefetzer" (real name begins with G and ends with X). Problem solved, for me anyway.

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*What was the purpose of VHS 20+ years ago and what is the purchase of DVD today if a person can't make personal copies of their favorite programs and movies?*

I've got a news flash for ya: These films are protected by copyright and you have no legal "right" to make copies. The court case cited some posts back merely makes reference to time-shifting & by extension, creating a personal library copy from on-air sources. But the studios have every legal right (& every financial interest) in preventing you from doing so. They want you to purchase their pre-recorded material (and legitimate, pre-recorded VHS tapes were generally copy-guarded, btw). Adding copyguard to broadcast or cable signals also dates back to the 1990s at least when premium channels such as HBO started protecting their signals.

Now I'm not saying absolutely that TCM is blocking their signal because Osborne is holding up copies of films available from Warner Home Video or on the TCM label by going to the store section of this site (which is actually the Movies Unlimited Catalogue) or because of TCM affiliation with Movies Unlimited, but no one seemed to be having recording problems before then.

And the post from talkietime just confirms my suspicion that you happen to have lucked out in having a cable or sattelite provider that isn't passing on TCM's signal block (which also appears not to be in force on all films).

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My post described how one Toshiba D-R410 DVD Recorder falsely applied copy protection to a home-recorded DVD (that was not "copy protected") when transferred to a Philips 3575 hard drive.

 

Since 2 September 2005 to the present day *I've never encountered copy protection with a TCM SD or TCM HD signal* with my thirty Panasonic, Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD recorders and DVD recorders. This includes more than 6,000 time-shifted, home-recorded DVDs.

 

I understand that there is no "right" to home-record copyrighted material. There is an *exemption from prosecution* when home-recording for personal use, i.e., "time-shifting" as "fair use." It's still "time-shifting" if I'm watching material I originally recorded from The Nostalgia Channel in 1987.

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HarryLong, I just did some googling and yes, it is illegal to make copies of films (lots of gray area though and big words) from cable and satellite programming. However, there are laws that say it is not illegal to purchase a copy yet it is illegal to sell one. Makes me wonder how these internet sites selling "rare" classics are still in business. I guess I did get lucky with either DirecTV or my Toshiba and I am willing to buy a "Veeblefetzer" if need be.

 

talkietime, I would be nervous having 30 DVD recorders in my house! And yes, you are right about "fair use". No movie studio would ever waste their resources in prosecuting me for trying to record a film that is not on DVD if I am making a copy for my home use. Now if they have proof that I am selling it online etc, that is a different story.

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Only thirteen of the recorders are set up for daily use. The rest are standbys. (The standby recorders also include one PYE and two Toshiba DVD recorders.)

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I record everything to my DVR before recording to DVD. There are times when the recording times are slightly off and miss the beginning or the end or it's the wrong movie, etc. This keeps me from having unwatchable DVDs.

 

 

FredCDobbs: I could call my cable company, but It wouldn't really do much good if they're the one's blocking recordings. They've already had hundreds (if not thousands) of people threaten and leave due to losing the Hallmark channels and seem to be doing nothing about getting them back.

One more person leaving or even just threatening to leave over recording blocks would basically do nothing.

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> {quote:title=talkietime wrote:}{quote}

> My post described how one Toshiba D-R410 DVD Recorder falsely applied copy protection to a home-recorded DVD (that was not "copy protected") when transferred to a Philips 3575 hard drive.

>

> Since 2 September 2005 to the present day *I've never encountered copy protection with a TCM SD or TCM HD signal* with my thirty Panasonic, Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD recorders and DVD recorders. This includes more than 6,000 time-shifted, home-recorded DVDs.

>

> I understand that there is no "right" to home-record copyrighted material. There is an *exemption from prosecution* when home-recording for personal use, i.e., "time-shifting" as "fair use." It's still "time-shifting" if I'm watching material I originally recorded from The Nostalgia Channel in 1987.

 

 

Yes. Most of the time, I do not watch a film before recording it ot dvd. I simply don't have the time right now. I'm recording to dvd to make more room on my dvr but being able to save the film for watching later. It's just a form of time shifting for me that works better with my personal time.

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> {quote:title=HarryLong wrote:}{quote}

> I might be wrong, but I was under the impression that all DVD recorders had the copyguard detection software in place. Itw as part of the agreement whereby the movie studios allowed the machines to be made available at the home use level.

 

This is true, all machines should be sensitive to 'copyguard.' There may be just a few that aren't. But, the real problem is that some detect it where it doesn't exist. Sonys and some Toshibas are notorious for this.

 

> If you know someone capable of such re-monkeying, the software can be disabled. There are also several little boxes (I call them Veeblefetzers) available that defeat the copyguard in most cases.

 

I see you are a Mad magazine fan... my "Veeblefetzer" converts a component signal to S-Video, so I can make anamorphic recordings. It does defeat copy protection, but I don't need it. On my local Comcast, nothing is copy protected, not even PPV, or OnDemand.

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