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?The Fountainhead?, best comedy of 1949


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I knew a philosophy major in college. All she did was use different philosopher?s names to justify doing whatever she wanted to do. If anyone accused her of doing anything stupid, or wrong, or rude, she?d quote one philosopher or another to try to justify her actions.

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OMG, it almost sounds as if you knew an Objectivist... Ayn did pretty much the same thing. She would create rationalizations for her behavior that fit her superior individual attitude toward life. It became her philosophy -Objectivist. I have heard it referred to lately as Ego Exceptionalism.. She totally rejected the concept of altruism. Which is why I can laugh at her pronouncements. Rational egoism is to me an oxymoron. It is the polar opposite of philosophy we see in Casablanca...

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Wasnt this the only movie based on one of her books? Think so. I think some studio optioned Atlas Shrugged but it never made it to the screen. Cant imagine what that movie would've been like..........She was a "pill" as they used to say. I've read some about her life..........

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> I knew a philosophy major in college. All she did was use different philosophers names to justify doing whatever she wanted to do. If anyone accused her of doing anything stupid, or wrong, or rude, shed quote one philosopher or another to try to justify her actions.

 

I often quote Plato when I want to bludgeon a student with a compass and staightedge.

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I had a math teacher in high school who tried to get us students to write out a.... something, I can?t remember what she called it.... maybe a ?proof? of each of Euclid?s major laws of geometry. Such as why does a straight line drawn through the center of a circle bisect the circle into two equal halves? I told her, ?It?s obvious. Just look at the drawing. Both halves must be the same size because that?s the way it is. That?s what happens when you draw a line right through the center of a circle! There is no reason for either side to be larger than the other, THEREFORE, they must be the same size.?

 

Well, she said that was ?not a proof? at all. We both thought each other were idiots.

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I have never been able to decide whether Raymond Massey was a great actor or the most perfectly cast stick-in-the-mud in the history of film.

 

Sorry if I'm being all "buttinsky" with this.

 

Feel free to go back to your Nietzche (sic, I'm sure)

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> {quote:title=JonnyGeetar wrote:}{quote}

> I have never been able to decide whether Raymond Massey was a great actor or the most perfectly cast stick-in-the-mud in the history of film.

 

 

 

His forward-looking ?futuristic? speech at the end of this movie was delivered exactly the same hammy way that he gave a similar speech at the end of ?Things to Come? (1936).

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Geetar:

I like your observations and snarkiness. You are welcome here! Exclamation fully intended.

 

Raymond Massey was usually brought into a cast when a wooden and flat delivery was needed. This was before the invention of the talking robots at Disney Theme parks.

 

No, Jonny, it is not too deep for you. I can't swim and it's not too deep for me. ;-) When people ask me about my Philosophy, I ask first, "Beyond my faith?"

When they say yes, I reply, *"Popeye Existentialism"*

h4. I am what I am..

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  • 3 weeks later...

IMHO, the failings of this film, which unintentionally make the hilarity a point of view, is that Rand's staunch control didn't allow for the necessary script changes that would have favored Coop's delivery. The luck in all of this film's glory was that sexual chemistry between Neal and Coop. That was the virtue.

 

You couldn't look at those two on screen and not feel it, see it, or sense it.

And the intentional mining of the drill bit symbolism underscored both the sexuality and the hilarity.

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  • 7 months later...

> {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> I often quote Plato when I want to bludgeon a student with a compass and staightedge.

 

 

Wasn?t it Popeye who said, ?I think, therefore I yam??

 

Anyway, ?The Fountainhead? is BACK!

 

It?s up next.

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I tried to watch it again, but I was so tired last night, I dozed off during part of it. (not that the film's campiness has waned or anything)

 

I was laughing during Neal's first scene (throwing the statue out the window) You know this broad has a screw lose from her first line of dialogue.........

 

I wonder if the book is as funny? I cant bring myself to read it...........

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I know that many people and critics don't feel The FountainHead is a successful picture but Neal has something in that picture that I have yet to see from any actress. Just something about her looks and in her eyes. Now I never viewed her as a great beauty like Oberon, Bergman, Garner, or Kelly but in this picture, she just does something to my system! The second half drags a little but those first meetings between Neal and Cooper are something unique.

 

I guess I love a crazy broad!

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If nothing else, this movie does something I was beginning to think was impossible; FredC and I actually agree on something. I hope we can keep it up, Fred, I really respect somebody who has packed so much living into your allotted time and sincerely hope you have a lot more left. Agreeor not, I always read your posts.

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