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DVRs and TCM


222characteractor

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I have recently been given a gift of a DVR. I used to tape all the great movies from TCM, but now use the DVR. The only disadvantage is that one cannot share a TCM movie with a friend by letting them borrow the VHS tape.

 

I was also given a Blue Ray DVD player that will also play VHS tapes which allows me to watch movies that I had taped before getting the DVR.

 

I didn't think I would like the DVR, but it has been a real wonderful thing to have.

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If you connect your DVR to a regular VHS player/recorder, you should be able to get all the movies you like on VHS - then you can lend them to your friends or watch them in the future.

 

(DVRs do tend to break down once in a while; it's always a good idea to have a copy on VHS or DVD-R just in case the DVR dies)

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The big problem with the DVR is finding the time to watch all the movies you have saved on your DVR.

I have movies saved on my DVR from last fall that I am just now getting to.

 

I don't know how some posters manage to watch all the movies they DVR or burn off to DVD.

 

I guess I need more hours in my day.

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Dougie,

I'm not really an expert on this, but I do know that when you have an HD-DVR, the amount of standard-definition it can hold is humongous - maybe 400 hours or so.

 

So, I'm thinking, maybe some of the movies they'll be showing, even then, will not be true HD but simply upconverted SD. Recording those as SD should continue to give you quite a bit of capacity, and you can save some disk space for those that are true HD.

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*We're all so anxious for TCM to go HD, but the HD programing takes up so much more space on the DVR. Hopefully, capacity will keep pace with HD programming.*

 

But the problem of finding the time to watch the movies you've recorded won't go away.

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One solution is to record to a (Standard Definition) Magnavox 2160 HDD/DVD recorder through a S-Video or yellow composite video input (plus the white/red audio connections) and then high-speed dub to DVDs. High-speed dubbing a full DVD takes about eighteen or nineteen minutes, including finalizing.

 

This thread has turned to discussing that Magnavox HDD/DVD recorder:

 

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=150158&tstart=0

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote} I don't know how some posters manage to watch all the movies they DVR or burn off to DVD.

 

Lynn, you mean we're suppose to actually watch them? I thought we just had to collect them. Well, there goes the rest of my life. :)

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> {quote:title=Kinokima wrote:}{quote}

> Oh man I wish I had a DVR or even a DVD-R recorder (I don't really understand the difference actually).

 

It's very simple - the DVR just records the shows/movies on an internal hard drive; you can also freeze or rewind whatever it is you're watching, even if you are not recording it.

 

With the DVD-R recorder, you can burn a DVD-R of most anything shown on TV, and then play it back on almost any DVD player.

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Here are a few more details:

 

A DVR is a device provided by a cable or satellite provider or a third party. The DVR may be fitted with a CableCard that allows the DVR to tune, map and record cable programming to an internal hard drive for later viewing. A DVR does not have a DVD drive so it does not record to ?removable media? (DVDs). Some DVRs permit offloading of Standard Definition programming content to the following devices:

 

A DVD recorder has a built-in DVD Drive that records programming to removable media (DVDs). A DVD recorder may or may not have a clear QAM tuner (for reception of non-scrambled cable programming), an ATSC tuner (for reception of digital broadcast stations with an antenna), a NTSC tuner (for antenna reception of the remaining analog broadcast stations in the US and Canada) or the DVD recorder may be tunerless. DVD recorders may record from their built-in tuners or from external sources through S-Video or composite inputs.

 

A HDD/DVD recorder has an internal hard drive and a DVD Drive. A HDD/DVD recorder may or may not have a clear QAM tuner (for reception of non-scrambled cable programming), an ATSC tuner (for reception of digital broadcast stations with an antenna) or a NTSC tuner (for antenna reception of the remaining analog broadcast stations in the US and Canada). The primary use of a HDD/DVD recorder is to record programming to the internal hard drive for later viewing, editing or high-speed dubbing of program content to DVDs. HDD/DVD recorders may record from their built-in tuners or from external sources through S-Video or composite inputs.

 

A VHS/DVD combo recorder may record programming to VHS videotape or DVDs. A VHS/DVD combo recorder may or may not have a clear QAM tuner (for reception of non-scrambled cable programming), an ATSC tuner (for reception of broadcast stations with an antenna) a NTSC tuner (for antenna reception of the remaining analog broadcast stations in the US and Canada) or the VHS/DVD combo recorder may be tunerless. VHS/DVD combo recorders may record from their built-in tuners or from external sources through S-Video or composite inputs.

 

Edited by: talkietime on Feb 15, 2010 6:56 PM

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> {quote:title=Kinokima wrote:}{quote}

> Thanks, that explains it perfectly. Hmm I wonder what would be better to get (well I guess the real question is what is generally more expensive?)

 

Last I checked, prices were in the neighborhood of $100 for a regular DVR (at least the DirecTV ones), $200 for a HD-DVR, and around $200 for a good Sony DVD/VHS recorder (other brands may be cheaper).

 

However, with DirecTV you should also be able to just lease the DVR and they'll ship it to you (I don't know about other cable/sat. operators).

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> I don't know how some posters manage to watch all the movies they DVR or burn off to DVD.

>

 

I'm up to about 200 DVDs I've burned, but have not had time to watch. Some, I haven't seen in years, some not at all. I'd guess roughly half are from TCM. Maybe if I broke my leg, I could be out sick from work long enough to see 25% of them... ;)

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> Dougie,

> I'm not really an expert on this, but I do know that when you have an HD-DVR, the amount of standard-definition it can hold is humongous - maybe 400 hours or so.

 

I have Comcast, and their HDDVRs run from 120GB to 320GB. My 120GB DVR will hold 15-20 hours of HD, or 50-60 of SD. My DVR is usually 60-80% full. If I can ever get it near empty, I'll swap it for a 320GB model, if my local office has them...

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"I'm up to about 200 DVDs I've burned, but have not had time to watch. Some, I haven't seen in years, some not at all. I'd guess roughly half are from TCM. Maybe if I broke my leg, I could be out sick from work long enough to see 25% of them..."

 

I've home-recorded more than 6,000 DVDs.

 

At the moment, between my home office and bedroom, I have twelve recorders set up for a variety of purposes.

 

Home office:

 

1-Magnavox 2160 HDD/DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola *DCX3200.

2-Magnavox 2160A HDD/DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola *DCX3200 or it may be switched to record TCM (SD), Encore Westerns (SD) or other SD cable networks from a Comcast Motorola **DCT700.

3-Magnavox ZV450MW8 VHS/DVD combo recorder set up for antenna reception, or dubbing from internal or external sources.

4-Philips 3576 HDD/DVD recorder set up for antenna reception, reception of TCM (SD), Encore Westerns (SD), other SD cable networks from a Comcast Motorola *DCT700, or dubbing from external sources.

5-Panasonic DMR-EZ28 DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola *DCX3200.

6-Panasonic DMR-EZ17 DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola *DCX3200.

7-Panasonic DMR-ES35V VHS/DVD combo recorder set up with a Zenith DTT901 CECB for ATSC reception, cable reception from a Comcast Pace *DC50X DTA, or dubbing from internal or external sources.

 

Bedroom:

 

8-Magnavox 2080 HDD/DVD recorder for clear QAM cable reception or switched to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola **DCX3200.

9-Philips 3575 HDD/DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola **DCX3200.

10-Panasonic DMR-ES35V VHS/DVD combo recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola **DCX3200.

11-Panasonic DMR-ES25 DVD recorder set up to record TCM (HD) from a Comcast Motorola **DCX3200.

12-Magnavox MWR10D6 DVD recorder set up to record from a Comcast Pace **DC50X DTA.

 

*Indicates a pass through connection.

**Indicates a direct connection.

 

I have another thirteen ?standby? recorders.

 

Edited by: talkietime on Feb 15, 2010 7:40 PM

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And how many of the 6,000 have you not watched? The 200 are only the ones I have yet to watch. I've recorded a couple of thousand, but I know from the AVS forum, you've got me beat by longshot...

 

I've got probably 1,000 vinyl LPs, 5-600 LDs, ~800 CDs and SACDs, and well over 2,000 DVDs. In the words of Pink Floyd, I have enough to be "Amused to Death," so, I'm not even jealous of your 6,000 DVDs. :P

 

That is, unless you have some films I want... :D

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