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HollywoodGolightly

Reactions to May 2010 schedule?

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Ramona (1910) - woo hoo!- wasn't expecting that.

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> {quote:title=mr6666 wrote:}{quote}

> Yikes! couldn't you have _just_ posted the link?

 

Well, yeah, that'd be the easier way.

 

I like to post the whole thing, if possible, because then people can check back when there are schedule changes, that kind of stuff - it becomes the only place in the website where you can see the schedule when it was first announced.

 

Hope you don't mind, I like to be thorough. ;)

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> {quote:title=Web wrote:}{quote}

> Ramona (1910) - woo hoo!- wasn't expecting that.

 

It's great to see that one again - they'd shown it earlier in the Latinos & Film series.

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And there's The Major and the Minor again. I'll have a series of 18 betamax's set-up to record that.

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It sure seems like *THE BIG PARADE* is never shown, except on Memorial Day. But it least it's running again. Even if it doesn't figure to be the 2004 restoration I have been waiting 6 years to see on TCM. If that were the case, one the list time would be longer and two, it would have hopefully gotten a Prime-time showcase rather than on Silent Sunday's.

 

The really Big and I do mean BIG surprise is *WHAT PRICE GLORY? (1926)!* That has never ever been shown on TCM before. It was on AMC in 1996, but is rarely on TV. Probably not shown anywhere since that time? so this is huge. I hope it's a nicely restored print. The version is 1996 looked good, and it was the 1930 Re-issue with a Fox Movie-tone score. But it could still be better with a fresh broadcast master. This is a pretty remarkable development because the movie is not on DVD anyplace. Could mean that TCM is at long last getting a hold of more of the Silents from the Fox library.

 

In addition, they are running *CAPTAIN SALVATION* and *THE BETTER OLE'* and *BEAU BRUMMEL*, during the month, so it looks like more of the Warner Archive Silents that have already been released, are starting to resurface now. If they would only run *THE VIKING.* This was supposed to have been offered by Warner Archive. It took them awhile to list it, and now it is not listed again at all as available for purchase?

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Im very pleased to see a day dedicated to Clarence Brown. The rarely shown Navy Blues (1930) with William Haines and The Son-Daughter (1932) with Ramon Novarro are two titles that have me excited for May.

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> {quote:title=SRHall wrote:}{quote}

> Im very pleased to see a day dedicated to Clarence Brown. The rarely shown Navy Blues (1930) with William Haines.

>

I just watched "Navy Blues" a few weeks ago (on a very old tape, from TCM about 1994). It's a fun one and I'm happy to see it coming up again. Good role for Karl Dane.

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THE BOWERY BOYS continues

THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1935)

NAVY BLUES (1929)

THE SON-DAUGHTER (1932)

DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK (1939)

WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD? (1932)

VALLEY OF THE SUN (1942) Tom Tyler as Geronimo

DANGEROUS BLONDES (1943) Dwight Frye completists

NINE GIRLS (1944) canceled twice in the past

WHAT PRICE GLORY? (1926) saw it on PBS circa 1974

 

Unfortunately, Mary Astor Day doesn't feature the ultra-rare RETURN OF THE TERROR (1934)

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Yes, DANGEROUS BLONDES is a Columbia gem and a Cinecon favorite. Also a couple of seldom-shown Warners from Milton Sperling: DISTANT DRUMS and BUGLES IN THE AFTERNOON. These last two were owned for years by Richard Feiner until he sold the package (sans ancillary rights) to Republic. They are now controlled by Paramount.

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> {quote:title=PrinceSaliano wrote:}{quote}

> THE BOWERY BOYS continues

> THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1935)

> NAVY BLUES (1929)

> THE SON-DAUGHTER (1932)

> DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK (1939)

> WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD? (1932)

> VALLEY OF THE SUN (1942) Tom Tyler as Geronimo

> DANGEROUS BLONDES (1943) Dwight Frye completists

> NINE GIRLS (1944) canceled twice in the past

> WHAT PRICE GLORY? (1926) saw it on PBS circa 1974

>

> Unfortunately, Mary Astor Day doesn't feature the ultra-rare RETURN OF THE TERROR (1934)

True, but TCM is showing RUNAWAY BRIDE (1930) and SIN SHIP (1931) two rarely shown Astor films. TCM has not shwon either of these in at least 10 years.

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I see they have rarely-aired THE GUN RUNNERS paired with TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT. What a shame they couldn't go for a triple and air THE BREAKING POINT along with them.

 

Or even today with the other Garfield films.

 

Nice to see WHAT PRICE GLORY and THE BIG PARADE on the schedule though, I haven't seen either in over 30 years.

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Hey Scottman, Prince, everyone,

 

Chuck Tabesh just told me that they are still working on landing the rights to the Photoplay Productions restoration/presentation of *WINGS*. He is meeting with people from Photoplay later on this month. So keep your fingers crossed! Again, the stumbling block has always been Paramount, not Photoplay. I'm sure Kevin Brownlow/Patrick Stanbery, would have leased it out a long time ago otherwise. At least there is a good chance finally for a TCM premier.

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> {quote:title=audreyforever wrote:}{quote}

> Yes! Mary Astor Day! Donna Reed is SOTM I believe, but what is the Spotlight?

 

I believe that the Spotlight for the month is the "Race in Hollywood" retrospective. :)

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For those of you who haven't seen it or haven't seen it recently, be sure to check out KING RAT this May. I'm more than a little fond of this film, as you might expect. Though I've seen TOKYO STORY, that's a film that definitely belongs on the TCM foreign film schedule. So of the movies I'm looking forward to seeing for the first time include:

 

SO WELL REMEMBERED

MARTY

ANNA CHRISTIE (the German version, also with Garbo, said to be better than the American version)

DEVIL'S DOORWAY

INTRUDER IN THE DUST

THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE

LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA

RUN OF THE ARROW

WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD?

WHAT PRICE GLORY?

THE BIG PARADE

PAISAN

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Oh *Paisan* has been recently released by Criterion so I bet this will be a nice restored print TCM is showing.

 

I still wish they would show foreign films at more reasonable times though.

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At the risk of sounding somewhat ungrateful, I was hoping that TCM would show MASSACRE (1934) and TREACHERY RIDES THE RANGE (1937) as part of the Native American theme for May.

MASSACRE is one of the few films in the 1930s to touch on the inequities of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. TREACHERY RIDES THE RANGE, while being a Dick Foran B picture also shows Native Americans in a sympathetic light. Jim Thorpe is in the cast as a Native American chief (he also plays a chief in THE DARK HORSE (1932), who give Guy Kibbee's character a Native Head dress as he makes him a honorary member of the tribe). All things considered, I really like the choices that were made for this theme, I just would like to have had a few of the rarely shown First National/Warner Brothers 30s titles represented too.

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I also wish that WHEN THE LEGENDS DIE (1972) had been included; I sometimes feel like the only person who's seen this fine little film that features quality performances by Richard Widmark and Frederic Forrest. But I'm looking forward to the films that are scheduled.

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I'm glad to see Samuel Fuller's Run of the Arrow on the schedule, it's one of the Fuller films still not on DVD.

 

There are several silent films, Nanook of the North chief among them, that I'm interested in. Although I already have the The Patsy and The Big Parade it's always good to see King Vidor on the schedule.

 

I haven't picked up the new Criterion Rosselini box yet so I'm eager to see if they are airing their restored version of Paisan.

 

Also Truffaut's Story of Adele H. and Preminger's Angel Face, both of which I've been meaning to check out.

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AHA! I finally figured it out!

 

The reason the May schedule was 'late' was they wanted to distract people from the usual rants -- repeats, newer movies, etc., ad infinitum, ad nauseam.

 

Well, done, TCM for giving the nitwits some other nit to pick! :)

 

 

As I suspected, the May schedule is good (as always), but the only films I'm at all interested in watching are:

 

Angels Alley (1948)

The Fortune Cookie

Mr. Lucky (1943)

Anna Christie (German) (1930)

Smart Woman (1931)

Woman Against Woman (1938)

There's Always a Woman (1938)

Midnight (1939)

Green Mansions (1959)

The Fountainhead (1949)

Zaat (1972)

Jewel Robbery (1932)

Becket (1964)

The Son-Daughter (1932)

Murder In The Private Car (1934)

The Happy Road (1957)

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

Brother Orchid (1940)

The Blue Gardenia (1953)

I Love a Mystery (1945)

The Goodbye Girl (1977)

When Ladies Meet (1941)

Idiot's Delight (1939)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

Bell, Book and Candle (1959)

The Divorcee (1930)

Hide-Out (1934)

The Last Of Mrs. Cheyney (1937)

Lady In The Lake (1947)

Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)

The Ladykillers (1955)

On Borrowed Time (1939)

Double Wedding (1937)

A Kid For Two Farthings (1956)

Dangerous Blondes (1943)

The Heavenly Body (1943)

Command Decision (1948)

Stalag 17 (1953)

The Great Escape (1963)

King Rat (1965)

Battle Of The Bulge (1965)

Mister Roberts (1955)

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> {quote:title=Capuchin wrote:}{quote}

> AHA! I finally figured it out!

>

> The reason the May schedule was 'late' was they wanted to distract people from the usual rants -- repeats, newer movies, etc., ad infinitum, ad nauseam.

>

 

You might be on to something there, Capuchin. And you've selected a great list of titles that will be shown on TCM in May - we've all got something to look forward to. ;)

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*"At the risk of sounding somewhat ungrateful, I was hoping that TCM would show MASSACRE (1934)..."* - Scottman

 

I was hoping to see *Massacre* on the schedule also - if only to be able to post the poster image...

 

4408131133_758363d77f_m.jpg

(1934)

 

along with these other appropriate early titles.

 

4408897684_fb2cf36567_m.jpg

(1929)

 

4408898198_b4fcfeedb4_m.jpg

(1922)

 

4408130453_7d165c82a1_m.jpg

(1920)

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Thanks Kyle, those are some really neat posters!

I have REDSKIN on dvd, and it is a pretty good film.. The scenes in two-color Technicolor are excellent! I just remembered another good silent to add THE VANISHING AMERICAN (1925) also with Richard Dix.

 

Edited by: Scottman on Mar 5, 2010 5:43 PM it should have been plural, "scenes", D'oh!

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*"Thanks Kyle, those are some really neat posters!"* - Scottman

 

You're Welcome. Maybe I'll still figure out a way to incorporate the large versions of these images into the poster gallery in May.

 

*"I have REDSKIN on dvd, and it is a pretty good film.. The scene in two-color Technicolor are excellent!"*

 

I am never sure if certain early titles are among the "lost" films which is so common for films before 1930. Glad to know that *Redskin* still exists. But now I am disappointed that film isn't being shown. Early experiments in Technicolor fascinate me.

The "grouping" of the selected films is much different than in past editions of "Race In Hollywood". In the past, most films were presented in a chronoligical order - but not this edition.

 

*"I just remembered another good silent to add THE VANISHING AMERICAN (1925) also with Richard Dix."*

 

4408218967_1cd8157792_m.jpg

(1925)

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Since Richard Dix has been mentioned a few times in the last posts, I thought it might be okay to remind people in the L.A. area that the Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn across from the Hollywood Bowl has *"An Evening of Richard Dix Presented By His Son, Robert Dix"* taking place on March 10 at 7:30 pm. Robert Dix is going to talk about growing up with a famous father. There will be a photo preentation of both Richard and Robert's acting careers There will also be a signing of Robert Dix's autobiography, "Out of Hollywood."

 

The highlight of the evening is a "screening of a silent film, not shown since 1925...", which means it is likely "Too Many Kisses" since others of 1925 are believed to be lost: A Man Must Live, The Shock Punch, Men And Women, and The Lucky Devil. I'd like it to be The Vanishing American. Admission will be $10.

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