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What remakes were better than the original?


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Can anyone here think of any remakes they like better than the originals?

 

I have mentioned that I like the 1991 remake of ?Cape Fear? a little better than the 1962 original. But I like the 1931 original of ?The Maltese Falcon? a little more than the ?41 Bogart remake.

 

 

Generally, I like the early ?30s and ?40s sound remakes better than the old silent originals, and in the case of ?Show Boat?, I like the color 2nd remake better than the first two versions of the film. But in the case of ?Ben Hur?, I think I might like the silent version better than the big color sound version, although I haven?t officially decided that for sure.

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I prefer the 1936 Showboat better than the MGM color remake (the silent version is dreadful), and the original silent Ben-Hur better than the remake with Heston (which I've never cared for). I also like the 1931 Jekyll & Hyde with Fredric March much better than the 1920 silent with Barrymore, and....surprisingly....like "Mystery of the Wax Museum" (1933) better than "House of Wax" with Vincent Price (which I still like).

 

There are a couple of remakes in modern years which I thought were better than their classic older counterparts, but can't recall the titles at the moment.

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> {quote:title=mrroberts wrote:}{quote}

> How do you rate Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1931 vs 1941)? I have to consider that one a draw.

 

I agree, it is a draw. I like them both. The differences are fine and they make me interested in both versions.

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> {quote:title=rdmtimp wrote:}{quote}

> I definitely prefer the more recent *Quiet American* over the earlier one. Great atmosphere, and Michael Caine is outstanding.

 

I do too. The newer one makes it more clear to me that Alden Pyle was working for government interests that weren?t entirely charitable.

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I wonder what actor had the most movies remade? Seems like Fredric March must be high on the list...DR. JEKYLL, THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET, LES MISERABLES and THE BUCCANEER come to mind off the top of my head.

 

I adore March but although I like his version of BARRETTS very much, I lean toward preferring the Jennifer Jones-Bill Travers remake. I'm in the minority on that, but the later version has much to recommend it.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=mrroberts wrote:}{quote}

> > How do you rate Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1931 vs 1941)? I have to consider that one a draw.

>

> I agree, it is a draw. I like them both. The differences are fine and they make me interested in both versions.

 

 

For me it's not a draw at all. I highly prefer the 1931 version. :)

 

As for remakes eclipsing the original how about *His Girl Friday* over the 1931 version of Front Page? Admittedly I never saw it but Hawk's version is usually considered the best.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> I have mentioned that I like the 1991 remake of Cape Fear a little better than the 1962 original. But I like the 1931 original of The Maltese Falcon a little more than the 41 Bogart remake.

>

 

And I'd disagree with you strongly on both accounts, so the 1941 *The Maltese Falcon* is one remake I think superior.

 

I'd marginally pick the Fredrick March version of *Dr. & Mr.* over the Spencer Tracy version.

 

I'll take the earlier Laughton version of *The Hunchback of Notre Dame*, but I'll take the Brando version of *Mutiny on the Bounty* over the Gable version, but not by much, and neither are really great, just watchable.

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I prefer Hitchcock's remake of THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (Jimmy Stewart, Doris Day) to his 1930s original and prefer AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER to LOVE AFFAIR, mainly because there's more comedy in the remake. All in all, I prefer the 1950s SHOW BOAT to the Irene Dunne 1930s version, as much as I like Dunne's performance.

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Maybe not better, but on the same par with the original

"Prisoner of Zenda" the Granger remake of Colmans version:

 

3 Godfathers" the "Hells Heros" and the 1936 and 1949 versions;

 

"A Star is Born" the Garland or the Gaynor version: alright the Streisand version also

 

" 3 Musketeers" the The Yorke / Reed version over the Kelly / Heflin one

 

Crosbys "White Christmas" over Crosbys "Holiday Inn"

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> For me its "The Fly", "The Thing" and "The Little Princess".

 

I agree on *The Fly*, don't agree on *The Thing*, and have no intention of watching *The Little Princess*.

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LITTLE WOMEN

 

I like Kate Hepburn's work as Jo in 1933's LITTLE WOMEN, and I think George Cukor's direction is great. But I really like the 1949 version better.

 

I think the MGM production values are better, it's in Technicolor and that helps brings Alcott's book to life. The male leads are better...Peter Lawford is excellent as Laurie and Rosanno Brazzi is the perfect, romantic Professor Bhaer. Mary Astor is a great Marmee. We have C. Aubrey Smith and Elizabeth Patterson, Elizabeth Taylor, Janet Leigh, June Allyson and Margaret O'Brien. And Lucille Watson is the perfect Aunt March. So much loving care was put into the 1949 version and not one character is miscast. This is my favorite remake.

 

THE RACKET

 

I think this film noir fares very well in its early 50s remake with Robert Mitchum, Robert Ryan and Lizbeth Scott. The material seems a bit dated (a story originally produced in the late 20s by Howard Hughes), but the performances are great and Lizbeth Scott generates a lot of heat.

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LITTLE WOMEN

 

I like Kate Hepburn's work as Jo in 1933's LITTLE WOMEN, and I think George Cukor's direction is great. But I really like the 1949 version better.

 

Different strokes - for me, the '49 is the weakest of the 3 versions (I have '33 and '94 in a dead heat for first) mainly due to June Allyson. She's an acquired taste, and I've just never been able to acquire it.

 

Some other remakes:

ENCHANTED APRIL - the '92 beats the '35 by a mile.

THE PAINTED VEIL - I prefer the 2005 to the '34, even with Garbo (I haven't seen THE SEVENTH SIN, the 1957 version of the same Maugham book).

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how about His Girl Friday over the 1931 version of Front Page?

 

I disliked Front Page, not least because I intensely dislike Pat O'Brien -- I *loathed* his I Married A Doctor.

 

His Girl Friday was a sheer joy.

 

Ooops, forgot all about the one remake I truly liked -- Heaven Can Wait. Not as good as the original, of course, but not bad.

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I need to see the 1991 Cape Fear. I know Encore Mystery and Drama channels have been showing both versions. I'd be lying if I said I don't enjoy Robert Mitchum as the creepy guy - to the point where I pause for hysterical laughter (particularly in the scene when he asks Peck to "check our her jiggle")

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We were just discussing Victor/Victoria in another thread, in which we all mostly agree that the 1982 version is actually better than the 1933 & 35 versions. They were able to be a little more "open" about the subject matter plus the cast was outstanding.

 

I've always preferred the 1959 version of Imitation of Life mainly because of Susan Kohner's performance. The 1934 version has Claudette Colbert in the lead who is more emotional and sympathetic than Lana Turner, but Lana's coldness works ok in this particular story.

 

I also prefer the 1961 The Children's Hour to the earlier These Three from 1936. Although the first version is good, they obviously could imply just a bit more than the earlier version. I thought it was one of Shirley MacLaine's best performances and shows she was an all around talent; singing, dancing, comedy and tough drama.

 

This is why I think Hollywood should leave schlocky 60's TV alone for remakes and instead try to tackle tougher subjects that couldn't be fully explored in earlier versions. Yeah I like subtleness, but in another thread Cat On A Hot Tin Roof was mentioned as a "watered down" story. I'd love to see what it's really about.

Although in the Psycho remake, listening to Norman unbuckle his pants and jiggle while watching Marion undress added NOTHING to the story.

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The MGM remake of WATERLOO BRIDGE with Vivien Leigh and Robert Taylor is much better than the original version with Mae Clarke and Douglass Montgomery, IMO.

 

The third version, GABY is by far the weakest of the three versions but I thought Leslie Caron was lovely in it. I actually told Leslie Caron in December at a Barnes and Noble book signing in Manhattan I liked her in the film GABY, since everyone else was saying how great she was in GIGI and AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, and you should have seen her reaction! She stopped signing the book, looked up at me and said "GABY?!?! GABY? - The version with Vivien is MUCH better. See that one instead."

 

I just said Oh, OK, thanks" and I moved on.

 

LOL, she was right of course, but I guess no one else had mentioned GABY to her in a long time

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> I have mentioned that I like the 1991 remake of Cape Fear a little better than the 1962 original. But I like the 1931 original of The Maltese Falcon a little more than the 41 Bogart remake. Generally, I like the early 30s and 40s sound remakes better than the old silent originals, and in the case of Show Boat, I like the color 2nd remake better than the first two versions of the film. But in the case of Ben Hur, I think I might like the silent version better than the big color sound version, although I haven't officially decided that for sure.

It's not fair to compare films to their earlier 30's counterparts. They were still in the infancy of sound.

Off the top of my head I would say "Godfather II"

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I bought a copy of the 94 version of LITTLE WOMEN, but I have not seen it. I need watch it to see Mary Wickes as Aunt March, since she is one of my favorite character actresses.

 

June Allyson is definitely an acquired taste of mine. I love her.

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