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I'm mad! Alice in Wonderland (1933) DVD!! Cut-Version.!


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*_Per Wikipedia_:*

 

 

This film has never been released on VHS or DVD, although it is occasionally broadcast on cable television channels such as Turner Classic Movies. The original running time was 90 min., but when Universal Studios bought the television rights in the late-1950s, it was cut to 77 minutes.

 

 

The DVD of: _Alice in Wonderland_ (1933 film), run time is: 1 Hr. 17 Mins... which means the film is cut ...so what has been cut out!?!?!

 

 

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> {quote:title=CelluloidKid wrote:}{quote}

> *_Per Wikipedia_:*

>

>

> This film has never been released on VHS or DVD, although it is occasionally broadcast on cable television channels such as Turner Classic Movies. The original running time was 90 min., but when Universal Studios bought the television rights in the late-1950s, it was cut to 77 minutes.

>

>

> The DVD of: _Alice in Wonderland_ (1933 film), run time is: 1 Hr. 17 Mins... which means the film is cut ...so what has been cut out!?!?!

>

I believe this is all we'll ever see of this version. Some material reportedly was cut before release in 1933, but if that footage were found and restored to this new DVD release that would be Major Film Restoration News!

 

I just checked two different sources (film industry Trade Papers) from 1933 to see what they reported the running time to be, and both said 75 minutes! (Two minutes short of the actual correct timing).

 

Descriptions of the footage cut in 1933 is in some books...I can't recall which right now, as so many of this film's stars have "Films of..." and other books about them (W.C. Fields, Cary Grant, Gary Cooper). But I believe it's in one of the Fields books where you'll find the cut scenes pretty well described.

 

Has anyone ever seen anything longer than the 77-minute version of this movie?

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The 90 minute version did exist, however I am not sure if that is what premiered. Based on this note on IMDB, I am surmising the "fantasy" sequences remain intact:

 

"The film was previewed at 90 minutes and featured scenes with Julie Bishop as Alice's sister, Harvey Clark as Father William, and Lucien Littlefield as Father William's son. These scenes were deleted and the general release version runs 75 minutes."

 

 

I have not purchased a copy yet, but when I do I will certainly check out the credits to see if those names are mentioned, however as has been noted, the running time of the DVD is 77 minutes, not 75.

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> {quote:title=HarryLong wrote:}{quote}

> Actually TCM has shown it at least once... During their W.C. Fields tribute a few years back.

>

Yes, they did, and it was a nice restored print (complete with the NRA logo preceding the Paramount opening logo). It looks and sounds great. This is probably the print being used for the new DVD.

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> {quote:title=richardny4me wrote:}{quote}

> The 90 minute version did exist, however I am not sure if that is what premiered. Based on this note on IMDB, I am surmising the "fantasy" sequences remain intact:

>

> "The film was previewed at 90 minutes and featured scenes with Julie Bishop as Alice's sister, Harvey Clark as Father William, and Lucien Littlefield as Father William's son. These scenes were deleted and the general release version runs 75 minutes."

>

>

> I have not purchased a copy yet, but when I do I will certainly check out the credits to see if those names are mentioned, however as has been noted, the running time of the DVD is 77 minutes, not 75.

>

 

Those names are not in the opening credts, further evidence that they were cut from the film before it was released in 1933.

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*_Alice in Wonderland_ (1933)* - Strange ....strange ....but very imaginative!!

 

 

Ingenious F/X for the 1930's .....this must have been a real eye treat for the depression era crowd!

 

Hard to imagine a world W./out internet, T.V et.,....Just radio, film and newspaper!

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*Per IMBD: Alternate versions for _Alice in Wonderland_ (1933):*

 

 

The film was previewed at 90 minutes and featured scenes with Julie Bishop as Alice's sister, Harvey Clark as Father William, and Lucien Littlefield as Father William's son. These scenes were deleted and the general release version runs 75 minutes.

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> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=CelluloidKid wrote:}{quote}

> Descriptions of the footage cut in 1933 is in some books...I can't recall which right now, as so many of this film's stars have "Films of..." and other books about them (W.C. Fields, Cary Grant, Gary Cooper). But I believe it's in one of the Fields books where you'll find the cut scenes pretty well described.

 

He played the egg, Humpty Dumpty. I saw it in Berkeley in the late '60s at a WC Fields festival.

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> I wonder what was the peoples response to this (at the time of 1933) movie? Bet it must have scared some small children.

>

Here's a review from the December 11, 1933 issue of "Film Daily":

 

Strictly juvenile entertainment with clever characterizations its greatest asset.

The Mad Hatter The March Hare, The Queen of Hearts, Humpty Dumpty, and all Lewis Carroll's immortal characters come to life in astounding likenesses in this feature that will appeal to every child who has heard, or read, the fantastic story of "Alice Through the Looking Glass". Great care has been taken in make-up, costumes and scenery. The dialogue is somewhat stereotyped and spoken in a monotone by all with the exception of Ned Sparks as the Caterpillar and W.C. Fields as Humpty Dumpty. The action is disjointed and lacks continuity. Little has been done to brighten up the dialogue which tends to confuse rather than explain the rapid sequence of scenes. Charlotte Henry's debut on the screen is not very impressive.

Direction: fair.

Photography: fair.

 

Note: this was not, as stated, Charlotte Henry's debut on the screen. She had already been in at least 12 films since 1930.

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