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Off Topic: Favorite Classic TV Shows?


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OH I'm glad you bumped this up because when it got "buried" I didn't even see Jackie's last post!

 

They did have a gift for getting old movies stars on it. Greer Garson even showed up

 

Greer Garson?! I wonder if Butterscotch has that in her library?

 

I have only seen a couple of skits on the show. I'm not sure I totally "get" martin and

rowhan's (sp?) humor all the time but it looked like a fun program.

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I'm sorry I totally missed your post, Jackie.

 

> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Thank you SO much for the link to the radiolovers.

>

> I am totally jumping on the bandwagon as far as radio shows are concerned - they are very good to listen to as you do other things and very calming compared to TV, especially if you have jittery nerves or problems with eyesight.

>

 

Yes! I do find it more relaxing than TV, especially in the mornings when I'm already rattled enough as it is.

 

 

> Did you know Mad Hat had his own ballroom back in the day? :)

>

> http://www.radiolovers.com/shows/B/BennyGoodman/BennyGoodman37-11-04MadhattanRoom.mp3

Ha!! That little "swinger"! Let's put on our dancing shoes and slinky bias-cut gowns and go dancing. I'm sure he'll forego the cover charge for us. :D

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Rowan and Martin.

 

A young lass like you might not get the show. It is such a 60s show. Psychedelic clothes, Goldie Hawn's painted body, Henry Gibson's oddball poetry and Artie Johnson's "walnetto." No one knew what that was but that was okay. "Sock it to me" became a buzz phrase. Richard Nixon showed up just to say it.

 

It was political and racy at the same time it was being juvenile and sometimes just plain dumb. Some people went on to have big careers others went gently into the night.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > Did you know Mad Hat had his own ballroom back in the day? :)

> >

> > http://www.radiolovers.com/shows/B/BennyGoodman/BennyGoodman37-11-04MadhattanRoom.mp3

> Ha!! That little "swinger"! Let's put on our dancing shoes and slinky bias-cut gowns and go dancing. I'm sure he'll forego the cover charge for us. :D

 

 

Ha ha!

 

I think Rowan and Martin took the sort of "martini" style of Dean Martin, and combined it with blackout sketch comedy.... so it was like they were hosting a swingin' sixties party (where everyone was drunk, alcohol being the drug of choice), and you were invited. Then as you entered the party, they would begin to flash each little topical sketch....then they would go back to the party and everyne would comment on it.

 

I thought Laugh In was OK as a kid, but it seemed a little more geared to the older set, the Billy Wilder set, maybe... I liked the Smothers Brothers, which was geared to the teens and 20's youth culture. I was waaay too young for both of them, but I thought (and in some ways still think, now that I can look back on it) that the Smothers Brothers was the more brilliant and topical show. My parents were of an age more in fitting with Rowan and Martin, but had a more liberal mindset, so we always watched The Smothers Brothers, whereas we only watched Laugh In once in a while.

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the Smothers Brothers was the more brilliant and topical show.

 

It was indeed. Rowan and Martin were the equivalent of Madison Ave. cashing in on the sexual revolution hippie culture, the Smothers Brothers were the hippie culture. R&M did it well, but it flashy and slick.

 

Sadly, Dick Smothers is in financial trouble, and Tom has dropped out -- without tuning in or turning on, I think. Then again, perhaps he's a cool old dude......... :)

 

The SM gave me John Hartford, who very sadly died, and for that I'll always be grateful to them.

 

Plus, both shows were very much disliked by my parents, and that made me happy.

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I agree "The Smothers Brothers" was a better show. They were trying to be more. They had an attitude that was sharp as well as endearing. "Laugh-In" was more of a stylized show. It pretty much invented that quick cut almost overly edited style. Some of the jokes weren't funny as much as the way the were presented. You pegged it well.

 

You are quite correct in that they were after different generations. While each had their own opposition to the Vietnam War they seemed to present it in different styles.

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Thank you SO much for the link to the radiolovers.

>

> I am totally jumping on the bandwagon as far as radio shows are concerned - they are very good to listen to as you do other things and very calming compared to TV, especially if you have jittery nerves or problems with eyesight.

>

 

Hi Jackie,

 

I have been on that bandwagon for a good while now myself. I've been getting them from archive.org but I will definitely look at that site. I have the jittery nerves and I've started downloading a bunch of old radio shows, particularly The Jack Benny Program, but all kinds of things from the old mystery shows, to the quizz programs, all the big radio shows of the day I can find. I put them on a cdr and listen to them when driving. VERY relaxing and fun. I hardly ever listen to current media anymore!

 

> Did you know Mad Hat had his own ballroom back in the day? :)

>

> http://www.radiolovers.com/shows/B/BennyGoodman/BennyGoodman37-11-04MadhattanRoom.mp3

 

Hey I just saw this! :D

 

> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Ha!! That little "swinger"! Let's put on our dancing shoes and slinky bias-cut gowns and go dancing. I'm sure he'll forego the cover charge for us. :D

 

I sure will! Stop by anytime! Whether it's Peggy Lee, Dinah Washington, Bob, Bing and Doris or even the Andrews Sisters, you just never know who might show up! We are always swinging at the MADHATtan Room! :D

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> I have been on that bandwagon for a good while now myself. I've been getting them from archive.org but I will definitely look at that site. I have the jittery nerves and I've started downloading a bunch of old radio shows, particularly The Jack Benny Program, but all kinds of things from the old mystery shows, to the quizz programs, all the big radio shows of the day I can find. I put them on a cdr and listen to them when driving. VERY relaxing and fun. I hardly ever listen to current media anymore!

>

 

What are you favorite shows, Mad Hat? Have you listened to the Sherlock Holmes shows? I'm going to try them.

 

>

> I sure will! Stop by anytime! Whether it's Peggy Lee, Dinah Washington, Bob, Bing and Doris or even the Andrews Sisters, you just never know who might show up! We are always swinging at the MADHATtan Room! :D

 

Get ready because the ladies are steppin' out tonight....

 

 

For some rum boogie woogie....

 

 

And jumpin' and jivin'...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx41M6MSoag&feature=related

 

So beat me, daddy...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=452nacIoa6U&feature=related

 

Before we hit the road...

 

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I think my parents used to watch Red Skelton and Jackie Gleason. I have vague memories of that. I barely remember some of the variety shows like Ed Sullivan. So back then did the whole family sit through all of the Ed Sullivan Show or did the parents and the kids just pop in for the parts that they liked? There was defintely a lot of variety on his show.

 

We were fortunate in our house because in '67 we got the big Sylvania console color tv in the living room, plus we had an old portable black and white that was shuttled back and forth between the garage and our room and my sister's room. There was a lot of fighting over it! :)

 

I definitely remember the Smothers Brothers was big with my older brothers, I learned to really like them later. Stuff like Dean Martin and Laugh-in I know we watched as a family. It was Dean Martin that introduced me to Jonathan Winters and it's also where I first heard the term "Gold Digger". For years I had no idea what that meant but I eventually found out.

 

Of course I remember Carol Burnett which we all watched, and I remember the end of the variety show era with programs like Sonny and Cher and Tony Orlando and Dawn!

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I just loved Red Skelton so much... I think his show was one of the ones I really was excited to watch every week, but I was VERY little so I don't remember too well.

 

I really liked all the characters he played..... I remember he played two seagulls - Gertrude and Heathcliff, maybe? That rings a bell, and he played a bum who didn't talk that was my favorite - he did everything in pantomime.

 

In fact, years later, I had Red Skelton to thank for a piece of business I did in the play *The Belle of Amherst*. I played Emily Dickinson, and there was a scene in which I had to sew something in pantomime. If you ever want to see something beautiful, find the old Red Skelton shows or the special about him and watch him pantomime sewing on a button. It's a thing of beauty.

 

On Ed Sullivan, I liked Topo Gigio and it was good when the muppets were on.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

>

> What are you favorite shows, Mad Hat? Have you listened to the Sherlock Holmes shows? I'm going to try them.

>

 

Well Benny of course, I like the comedies, Burns and Allen, Alice Faye and Phil Harris, you know, about what you would expect from me, :) I'm getting into The Whistler now. There is this one quizz show, I can't think of the name, it has a panel of stars and they have to answer questions. I like that. I haven't tried Sherlock Holmes yet. Oddly enough though, I have been going through the Universal films the past few weeks. I will definitely give them a try.There is so much to explore with old radio shows. I'm so glad I started listening to them.

>

> Get ready because the ladies are steppin' out tonight....

>

>

> For some rum boogie woogie....

>

>

> And jumpin' and jivin'...

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx41M6MSoag&feature=related

>

> So beat me, daddy...

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=452nacIoa6U&feature=related

>

> Before we hit the road...

>

 

 

Woo Hoo! The place is jumpin'! :) I love those clips!

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I know Skelton mainly from his movies, I wasn't sure I would like them at first but he has really grown on me. I haven't seen much of his televsion work. I will look for the button sewing pantomime, maybe it's on youtube somewhere. I didn't know you did theater.

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>

> In fact, years later, I had Red Skelton to thank for a piece of business I did in the play *The Belle of Amherst*. I played Emily Dickinson, and there was a scene in which I had to sew something in pantomime. If you ever want to see something beautiful, find the old Red Skelton shows or the special about him and watch him pantomime sewing on a button. It's a thing of beauty.

>

 

That's adorable, Jackie. I was never a fan of Red, but you make me want revisit his work. I always thought he was ENORMOUSLY talented and even felt he could have essayed a dramatic role really well...did he ever?

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I am not sure if anyone would be interested in this but as a tribute to *John Forsythe* someone posted one of his Match Game episodes on youtube.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNc4bxIqzQs (Part 1 of 5)

 

Here is also one for *Robert Culp*

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Arc9axfNSjA (Part 1 of 5)

 

 

And I always wanted to watch *Rowans & Martin Laugh In* but I am most interested in the episodes when Larry Hovis & Richard Dawson were on the show and those seem impossible to find. :(

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

 

> That's adorable, Jackie. I was never a fan of Red, but you make me want revisit his work. I always thought he was ENORMOUSLY talented and even felt he could have essayed a dramatic role really well...did he ever?

 

 

I don't know. He could have, I think. Now I will say that I have never been very fond of Red's movies....but as a little kid, his TV show was very accessible to me, and he seemed so very sweet and kind. I've been looking for some stuff on youtube and I can't find any pantomime specifically...except one clip called Red Skelton Show - Solo ..... that one looks promising, and seems a lot like the Skelton I remember watching as a kid.

 

I think the button sewing pantomime was on a PBS special that talked about Skelton, Benny, Burns, and Caesar....all who made the transition from Vaudevile to radio to movies to TV.

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To everybody who wrote in about Red Skelton: The family could watch it together. He used double entendres which went over our kiddy heads but made our folks laugh. The skits were funny and his pantomimes always struck an emotional cord like Jackie Gleason's did. The seagulls were Heathcliff and Gertrude; when she was miffed she'd mutter "You dirty bird". Then there was henpecked husband George Appleby whose wife was always played by a sexy blonde guest, Freddie the Freeloader, and con man San Fernando Red. He always ended the show with a smile and "God bless!".

 

I was about the same age as Richard Skelton when he died and I guess it was the first time I realized celebrities had those things happen to them too. That boy knew he was loved. Red was in a class with Red Buttons and Ernie Ford who could make us laugh without blushing. Those were the days!

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I loved the way Skelton would sometimes throw in an adlib now and then. It was the first time I had seen anyone do that and I thought it was great. Little did I know it had been going on forever. He also seemed to have such fun on the show. His laughs, even at his own jokes, seemed so genuine.

 

Jack Benny I really discovered only recently. Someone used to carry him on cable but I didn't stay up until 3am to watch him. Same with Burns and Allen. DVDs are a wonderful thing.

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A couple of comments. Johnny Carson had done some time as a writer for Red Skelton, sometimes on the Tonight Show Johnny would do a little Gertrude and Heathcliff. And of course Johnny's idol was Jack Benny. Whether conciously or not, Johnny definitely had a lot of Benny's mannerisms . Since The Tonight Show and other NBC shows ( like Laugh In, Bob Hope specials, etc) were all taped at the Burbank studios all of the stars could go around doing walk ons on the various shows. It must have been an amazing place to work at in those days, someone should write a book about those days, maybe someone already has.

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Jack Benny was very, very good. Burns and Allen were outstanding, as was Ernie Kovacs.

 

Yes, there was a cable station at the birth of cable which regularly ran these shows, as well as Molly Goldberg and I Married Joan.

 

I never liked Skelton.

 

A great tragedy occurred when vaudeville died, and it occurred again when the writers struck a few years ago.

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I was wrong about the Skelton dvd - the one with "sewing on a button" is called *The Best of Red Skelton* and is only available as a PBS pledge gift and costs way too much money. The second disc in the set is called *The Pantomimes* and that is what I was thinking of. I thought it was available at Netflix, but that is a different "Best of" set. I haven't checked on ebay or any of the other sites...

 

Here is the link to the expensive set... if anyone can find it for less, or just the pantomimes dvd, I'd love to know.

 

http://www.wvpt.net/redskelton.html

 

Most of the other Skelton skits are fun but are very corny. But as a pantomime artist, he was wonderful...a real genius. That is what I always waited for in his show. It's amazing how when the TV went quiet we would be drawn in immediately and just stare at the man for the entire sketch, mesmerized.

 

I would say *Jack Benny* and *Burns and Allen* are probably the greatest comedy shows of their time and a whole lot of other times too. I always loved Benny, partly because I share a birthday with him. I've always been proud of that for some reason. Their shows make it clear why those guys were so loved - they were pros who seemed to love what they were doing, and weren't afraid to let others take the center stage each week while they stood back and gave us a knowing look.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Apr 9, 2010 9:11 AM

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I went to Classicflix.com to see if they maybe had it, but they only have "The Red Skelton Collection" which is just four of his TV "specials".

 

If you guys haven't see Jack being interviewed by Dick Cavett, you should. Here he is:

 

 

 

I love Jack, he's such an original. George and Gracie, too.

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Primosprimos: Thank you for mentioning Ernie Kovacs; I loved his show. The half-hour went by so fast and you always wanted more. Even the commercials were funny. I just couldn?t believe my eyes when the papers reported his death; it was like losing a relative. It was nice to find out what a decent man and loving parent he was for real. Steve Allen was another; they were what real ?family values? were about.

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> {quote:title=mrroberts wrote:}{quote}

> A couple of comments. Johnny Carson had done some time as a writer for Red Skelton, sometimes on the Tonight Show Johnny would do a little Gertrude and Heathcliff. And of course Johnny's idol was Jack Benny. Whether conciously or not, Johnny definitely had a lot of Benny's mannerisms . Since The Tonight Show and other NBC shows ( like Laugh In, Bob Hope specials, etc) were all taped at the Burbank studios all of the stars could go around doing walk ons on the various shows. It must have been an amazing place to work at in those days, someone should write a book about those days, maybe someone already has.

 

 

I love Johnny Carson. I can see the "Benny" in him, too. I bet it was fun in Burbank back then.

 

I still miss Johnny's presence in late night TV. And regret I was born too late to

really appreciate him when he was on. But I did enjoy his shows when I could, even

if I didn't always get the adult humor at the time. :)

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