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The best time-travel movies of all time


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> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote}

> No one seems to have mentioned 1945's Where Do We Go From Here, an unusual Fox musical, in which June Haver, Joan Leslie and Fred MacMurray keep popping up in different historical periods, all tied to a patriotic theme.

 

I think I actually recorded that the last time it was last shown on FMC, but I haven't watched it yet.

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To SansFin:

 

Yes, I remember seeing that article when it appeared in 2043. I kept it mind when I traveled to 2010.

 

But seriously (?): You're right in saying that physics does not support the idea of traveling faster than light -- it would require an infinite amount of energy. Even traveling AT the speed of light would cause the mass of the traveler to become infinite. And Captain Kirk is chubby enough as it is.

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H.G. Wells introduced the ?time travel? concept to the public in 1895, and he attributed it to Professor Simon Newcomb, who was a real guy who thought of the idea of making time a fourth dimension. The Wells idea about making a time-travel machine was not related to ?relativity? in any way, or to Einstein or the speed of light. Not at that time.

 

http://www.online-literature.com/wellshg/timemachine/1/

 

But about 20 to 25 years later, some science-minded people, after studying the first major Einstein theory of relativity of 1905, thought they might devise a way so that backward time travel might be possible, if they could ever invent a rocket that could go faster than the speed of light. But this involved a ?trick?.

 

Here?s a clip from an old 1923 documentary flim about the idea. Figure the year numbers are light rays leaving the earth at the speed of light, and the fast little thing below them, that moves to the left, is a rocket that exceeds the speed of light and goes out and turns around and looks back:

 

http://www.vintagetooncast.com/2006/11/einstein-theory-of-relativity.html

 

The ?trick? involved traveling faster than light and going out a long way, and then turning around and watching the light rays of some past event reaching the traveler way out in space.

 

But there were all sorts of problems with that idea, such not being able to travel that fast, and the only thing we could ?see? like that had to take place outdoors in bright sunlight, we?d ?see? only the tops of people?s heads, and there is no way to construct a telescope that powerful that would enlarge a small scene on earth that much. That is not ?real? backward time travel, such as the kind we see in sci-fi movies, since one could only ?observe the past? without interacting with it.

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Thanks for the title. I read it while I was in High School, and couldn't remember the title. There is also a mediocre Sci Fi film, made in the last few years, that borrows that concept. I can't recall the title.

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Hi again everyone. Does anyone out there remember seeing a truly bizarre film from 1930 called JUST IMAGINE? Not strictly speaking a time-travel film but more of a Rip Van Winkle story. And, get this a multi-genre film Part comdey, part science fiction or prediction and, to top things off,a musical no less. It concerns a rube of sorts played by El Brendel(?) who falls asleep or is frozen awake(?) and finds himself in the far-off world of 1980! An absolutely hilarious and incredibly way-off work which should be seen to be believed.The predictions of life in the future are somewhat reminiscent of the 1939 New York World's Fair film, 1960.Best BruceG.

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Where Do We Go From Here is an unusual musical. I believe Fox was trying to costar June Haver with Jeanne Crain, both of which had found success the previous year in 1944's Home In Indiana. Joan Leslie was borrowed from Warners when Jeanne Crain got the plum assignment of Margie Frake in the 1945 musical remake of State Fair (after it was turned down by Alice Faye), and thereby cementing her stardom. I believe that Fred MacMurray's part in WDWGFH was originally meant for Don Ameche, having just left or about to leave the studio after 10 years.

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Finally got to see George Roy Hill's Slaughterhouse-Five, it's a pretty good movie even though somehow I suspect the original novel on which it is based must be even more enjoyable. Something tells me not everything that was in the book could be put into the movie.

 

But it was still a pretty good movie, with a kind of time travel that is pretty different from most other movies, and it even manages to throw in some sort of space travel, as well (unless those parts taking place in the other planet were all in Pilgrim's imagination, of course).

 

I suppose there are worse things that could happen to a guy than being stuck in another planet with Valerie Perrine for the rest of their lives. ;)

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>>No one seems to have mentioned 1945's Where Do We Go From Here, an unusual Fox musical, in which June Haver, Joan Leslie and Fred MacMurray keep popping up in different historical periods, all tied to a patriotic theme.

 

It's referenced early in the thread. I saw it again on HBO about a year ago and the print is gorgeous.

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> Finally got to see George Roy Hill's Slaughterhouse-Five, it's a pretty good movie even though somehow I suspect the original novel on which it is based must be even more enjoyable. Something tells me not everything that was in the book could be put into the movie.

>

 

I'm a Vonnegut fan, and Slaughterhouse-Five is considered one of his best. The movie is a fair representation, but far from an equal. Read the book if you get the chance.

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It's a pretty fast read. Not too long, and the author's style is easy and flowing. And it's excellent. Hand down, the best Vonnegut I've read, though I don't know them all. I think you'd like it.

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I think that Cat's Cradle is still my favorite Vonnegut. I read it in 1966. All of his books I have read are fun and quick to read, because of his style, and sense of humor. But, there is a lot of real meaning there too.

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I like CAT'S CRADLE, BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS, THE SIRENS OF TITAN. Others left me cold. PLAYER PIANO is quite intelligent. Thought provoking. But it's not a lot of fun. SLAPSTICK never really gets off the ground. At that point, I guess I stopped reading him.

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I like God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, Mother Night, Between Time and Timbuktu, and the previously mentioned Slaughter-house Five, or the Children's Crusade quite a bit too. I haven't read any of his later stuff.

 

Venus on the Half-Shell, featuring Vonnegut's character Kilgore Trout, but actually written by Philip Jose Farmer, is quite a good read too. It's humor and philosophy are very much like Vonnegut's.

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Holly, Maybe Kurt Vonnegut himself was a time traveller. He certainly looked otherworldly or like a man out of place or time.Unfortunaely for him, he did run out of time, and that is a great loss to literature and possibly, time-travel. In their own way, movies are something like alternative universes, depicting what-if and when themes, or remember-when plots.Books are the same. They are gateways to the imagination and roads to the impossible. All that is needed is a good storyteller, either a director or an author, to steer the course for us, and to let us off once in a while to rest.Best, BruceG.

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He certainly looked otherworldly or like a man out of place or time.

 

That he did. About ten years ago, I was wearing shaggy hair and a beard; somebody said, "The sixties are over, my friend. It's time to move on." Says who?

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> Would you say, perhaps, that he might truly have been ahead of his time? ;)

 

 

Or, a reincarnation of Mark Twain, who he resembled, and had a similar sense of humor.

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