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The World of Alfred Hitchcock


MissGoddess
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> I'm innocent! I'm wearing a "fancy" white hat! :P

>

 

Oh boy, again with the clothes. :P

 

> This is true. Scottie (James Stewart) wasn't married. Lil and Alice are after married chaps.

>

 

That's terrific! I never would have thought about the swimming pools...gosh, these two movies are really starting to converge.

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In about 20,000 you're defending yourself against "sweet" and "loving" Frank Grimes, but I've ejoyed the 2,000 of them where you talk about movies.

 

CONGRATULATIONS ON 22,000+ posts, Miss G. You have an expressive way of expressing yourself.

 

"Jameson Thomas as Sam looks like one of my students, the one I said resembles a cross between Boris Karloff and a camel." - < Bronxgirl >

 

Wow! Bronxie!

 

"And I've always wanted to have my underwear sewn by French convent nuns." - < Bronxgirl

 

WOWWWWWW Bronxie!!! I sure hope Sister Betrille isn't one of the seamstresses.

 

Frank Grimes: What a wonderful comparison between[/b]"MARNIE"[/b] and [/b]"CAT PEOPLE."[/b] I

never thought of it. Both young woman, terrified and held hostage by their pasts, unable

to have a ******** fulfilling life. Whaddup with the authors writing about this type of woman?

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A couple of years ago Larry King had the Hitchcock leading ladies, 'Tippi' Hedren, Kim Novak, Janet Leigh and Eve Marie Saint, along with Pat Hitchcock, on for a series of shows about the director. YouTube has parts 2 through 4, but as is often the case on that site, part 1 is missing. What is there is very interesting and probably the last _lengthy_ interviews of the Hitchcock blondes:

 

 

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I have seen this interview before. It was interesting. But here is an interview with Norman Lloyd from Bernard Herrmann website. It is a small interview. Its an interesting read.

 

Norman Lloyd was a close friend of Both Hitchcock and Herrmann. He explains about their personalities and their falling out while working on Torn Curtain.

 

http://www.bernardherrmann.org/articles/smith/lloyd/

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Konway, when I try the link or even the main home page it doesn't come up. I will try it again later from my home computer.

 

I wish I could have been at the TCM Film Festival, when Mr. Lloyd attended and spoke.

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Found it, read it. It was wonderful, thank you, Konway. Boy, Hitch came off sounding soooooo much like Pappy Ford in that it's hilarious. I guess it's an artist's thing. But we all are a little the poorer that those two men didn't keep working together.

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Frank -

 

Your discussion of Marnie/Cat People is really inspired! In fact, your posts on Marnie have been very interesting and some of the best writing you have done on the boards I think.

 

The only difference between them I can think of is that in Marnie, there is an explanation for Marnie's fear, whereas in Cat People, there is no explanation - there is never even an attempt to explain. There is also no attempt to show whether it is all in her mind, or if there really is some curse. Of course, I like that kind of open endedness. We really only see Irena through the eyes of Ollie and Judd, i, e, "regular people". But somehow we know better than they. We know there is something else, not some psychological problem at work..... we empathize with Irena. I love it so.

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Hey Grumpy Dutch Boy!

 

I thought so, too! Boy, was I wrong.

 

You?re just grumpy! Someone needs a hug! And if you say the word, ?No? to me again, I WILL take out my long black gloves! Muwahahaha! Heehee!

 

Yes, Jackie's point was a great one! I don't think it's just survival for her, though. I think it was also something else. She was trying to find a sense of closure through a difficult way.

 

How so?

 

Because I think she really wanted to find that missing element to her life; the true reason for the life she was leading; the ?hate? for men she protruded. she just went about it in the wrong way, inadvertently. Ironically, her way of trying to find ?closure? was through thievery, and using men to her advantage. She just didn?t understand the havoc, she was wreaking.

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Right now, I'm watching that other Hitchcock blonde: DORIS DAY in Guest Programmer's Shirley Jones' pick: "LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME." Doris looks like a million bucks ( pre- Depression, pre-tax dollars ), and sounds like sweet maple syrup ( a dream ). She's putting over these songs. And she does a good solid acting job in this film. Cagney? Oh yeah...he goes without saying.

 

Doris dances...sings...does comedy...does drama. Tsk! She no longer wishes to speak about her career and I'll respect that. But I don't have to like it. Yeah, just call me a selfish film buff.

 

I'm waitin' to see her do "Ten Cents A Dance."

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Well...let me just say that Doris puts a lot of oomph into her rendition of "TEN CENTS A DANCE." I enjoy her in this film. She's totally committed to the part. True to life of Ruth Etting's story...uhmm, NO. But good job. She's steps right up to Cagney, especially when she's drinking and sarcastic to him. It isn't my favorite movie of hers. I like my Day frothy and pert ("Send Me No Flowers" and "Pillow Talk"), hysterical ("The Man Who Knew Too Much" "Midnight Lace" "Julie"), tomboyish ("Calamity Jane") and serious as she was with Cagney.

 

I'm a Doris Day fan.

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You are right, her rendition of Ten Cents A Dance is pretty earthy .

 

Anyone who thinks of Doris as only a frothy comedienne or a light singer needs to watch her in *Love Me or Leave Me.* She is sensational in it. The film is not one of my favorites either, but both performances are great.

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Doris is seriously underappreciated as a bona fide actress. She could do it all and with an unswerving conviction. You never see her just walking through a part, no matter how ephemeral it may have been written to be. Comedy (and musical comedy on top of that) are TOUGH to pull off and to be able to also do serious drama, well, how many musical comedy stars could say they did that? I admire her professionalism.

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Speaking to your "identification" with Marnie, I'll take a "stab" at it. (sorry)

 

It might be a fear of "letting go" and growing up, mistrust of intimacy while yearning for it, and lingering childhood "guilt" involving parental separation.

 

Of course, I could be all wrong, and frequently am.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on May 12, 2010 12:51 AM

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