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The World of Alfred Hitchcock


MissGoddess
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> What woman doesn't show disapproval?!

>

 

I disapprove of that!

 

> Yes, most definitely. And don't you often say you find film noir to be "cold," particularly the men?

>

 

Sometimes, yes. But my quarrel is not with Frenzy's coldness, it's the ordinary, dull, insipidness.

 

> I can't see Cary Grant signing off on his playing "working class." He would seem out of place.

>

 

WEll he did it.

 

> I've known more "Uncle Bob's" than "Uncle Charlie's." He's far more "regular" to me. This is Frenzy.

 

That I believe. It's a "modern" movie. Hence it being quite distasteful to me. I don't want movies about people I've known.

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I disapprove of that!

 

That's all I've known with you!

 

Sometimes, yes. But my quarrel is not with Frenzy's coldness, it's the ordinary, dull, insipidness.

 

You just said "Uncle Charlie" was warm! Ordinary folk can be dull but I found the film to be rather engrossing. You found it to be gross. :D

 

WEll he did it.

 

Yes, he did. He plays such a man in Mr. Lucky. He's a schemer.

 

That I believe. It's a "modern" movie. Hence it being quite distasteful to me. I don't want movies about people I've known.

 

You certainly prefer escapism and dreams versus reality and nightmares. Generally speaking, I associate that with female. I'm a stupid guy who likes nightmares. :P

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> You just said "Uncle Charlie" was warm! Ordinary folk can be dull but I found the film to be rather engrossing. You found it to be gross. :D

>

 

It's not the "ordinary" in the sense of "every day" or "working class" that I mean...I mean these 70s actors have an emptiness to them, you sense they have no real life outside of acting. They are so insipid. When Joseph Cotten takes on a role, he brings a richness of character to it no matter who he is portraying.

 

This is something generational, I believe.

 

> Yes, he did. He plays such a man in Mr. Lucky. He's a schemer.

>

 

He's not charming, though, in None but the Lonely Heart. He's rather rotten and it's not played for laughs.

 

> You certainly prefer escapism and dreams versus reality and nightmares. Generally speaking, I associate that with female. I'm a stupid guy who likes nightmares. :P

 

I don't mind a nightmare, if I know there will be a point where we wake up.

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It's not the "ordinary" in the sense of "every day" or "working class" that I mean...I mean these 70s actors have an emptiness to them, you sense they have no real life outside of acting. They are so insipid. When Joseph Cotten takes on a role, he brings a richness of character to it no matter who he is portraying.

 

They were stage performers, not movie stars. But I understand your point. It's true, Frenzy is a 70s film and Hitch was trying to stay relevant in a changing film world. I really enjoy his two 70s films. I believe both are very Hitchcockian.

 

He's not charming, though, in None but the Lonely Heart. He's rather rotten and it's not played for laughs.

 

It sounds very interesting.

 

I don't mind a nightmare, if I know there will be a point where we wake up.

 

No!

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>

> They were stage performers, not movie stars. But I understand your point. It's true, Frenzy is a 70s film and Hitch was trying to stay relevant in a changing film world. I really enjoy his two 70s films. I believe both are very Hitchcockian.

>

 

And I think he had little choice in the actors he worked with at this point. They are all (except the one playing Blaney) good and talented performers, they're just rather empty to me.

 

> It sounds very interesting.

>

 

It's a bleak, depressing movie so maybe you'd love it! Closest Cary ever came to "noir".

 

> I don't mind a nightmare, if I know there will be a point where we wake up.

>

> No!

 

Yes! Hitch said it best when he analyzed why people enjoy getting scared in the movies...it's because they know they're safe and they're not in the position of the people suffering up there on the screen. That's akin to waking up after the nightmare.

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And I think he had little choice in the actors he worked with at this point. They are all (except the one playing Blaney) good and talented performers, they're just rather empty to me.

 

I don't believe he wanted anything to do with stars after Torn Curtain.

 

It's a bleak, depressing movie so maybe you'd love it! Closest Cary ever came to "noir".

 

You're tempting me!

 

Yes! Hitch said it best when he analyzed why people enjoy getting scared in the movies...it's because they know they're safe and they're not in the position of the people suffering up there on the screen. That's akin to waking up after the nightmare.

 

Hitch rarely ever had a tragic ending. I love my tragedies.

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> I don't believe he wanted anything to do with stars after Torn Curtain.

>

 

The new breed of stars, no. They had more power and exerted control and influence over their films, which Hitch would not tolerate, nor should he have. So yes, I see where he'd prefer "unknowns". But he can't have been blind to the results.

 

> Hitch rarely ever had a tragic ending. I love my tragedies.

 

You are crazy! But some tragic endings do seem the only possible way. I just can't take too many of them.

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I remember Stewart giving a somewhat similar speech when he calls out Brandon and Phillip

toward the end of the movie, though I believe they left the "you swine" phrase and some other

parts out. It came as a bit of a shock because up till then Rupert had been pretty calm and

collected. One of the aspects of the movie I noticed was the old "weak link" partner that so

often happens in crime pictures. Phillip becomes pretty hysterical and careless in his speech

and actions around Rupert and I got the impression that super cool Brandon might just be

considering making bigmouth Phillip his next victim.

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You mentioned liking the ending of FRENZY..I wonder what are your---and anyone else who would please join in---top ten favorite Hitchcock endings?

 

I just love this question. It's a Hitch list I've never done.

 

20. Sabotage

19. I Confess

18. Rope

17. Spellbound

16. Dial M for Murder

15. Number Seventeen

14. Secret Agent

13. The Manxman

12. Young and Innocent

11. Marnie

10. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

9. Blackmail

8. Saboteur

7. Murder!

6. Frenzy

5. Strangers on a Train

4. Foreign Correspondent

3. Vertigo

2. Notorious

1. Psycho

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SPOILERS

 

Here are my top 10 endings.

 

1) Foreign Correspondent (1940)

2) Rope (1948)

3) Saboteur (1942)

4) The Paradine Case (1947)

5) Psycho (1960)

6) Vertigo (1958)

7) Marnie (1964)

8) Waltzes from Vienna (1934)

9) The Birds (1963)

10) Notorious (1946)

 

I don't know if anyone knows this - Hitchcock wanted to end Strangers on a Train with Guy saying "Bruno, Bruno Anthony - a clever fellow." But the studio forced him to shoot a happy ending.

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> {quote:title=konway87 wrote:}{quote}

> I don't know if anyone knows this - Hitchcock wanted to end Strangers on a Train with Guy saying "Bruno, Bruno Anthony - a clever fellow." But the studio forced him to shoot a happy ending.

 

I don't think I'd ever heard about that before, but I do find it a bit surprising - I'd have thought that by that point in his career, Hitch had enough clout to make his movies the way he wanted, with minimal studio interference.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> You mentioned liking the ending of FRENZY..I wonder what are your---and anyone else who would please join in---top ten favorite Hitchcock endings?

>

> I just love this question. It's a Hitch list I've never done.

>

> 20. Sabotage

> 19. I Confess

> 18. Rope

> 17. Spellbound

> 16. Dial M for Murder

> 15. Number Seventeen

> 14. Secret Agent

> 13. The Manxman

> 12. Young and Innocent

> 11. Marnie

> 10. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

> 9. Blackmail

> 8. Saboteur

> 7. Murder!

> 6. Frenzy

> 5. Strangers on a Train

> 4. Foreign Correspondent

> 3. Vertigo

> 2. Notorious

> 1. Psycho

 

Wow, I'm amazed how many early Hitch titles are on your list. Seven of them. I don't even remember the endings to most of them. So, are the endings to the top listed titles big reasons why those films are favorites? I know you've said Psycho was your very favorite.

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"You mentioned liking the ending of FRENZY..I wonder what are your---and anyone else who would please join in---top ten favorite Hitchcock endings?" - < MissGoddess >

 

Wow...good question. You're getting my neurons stirring...energized...thinking. Some of my cob-webs are clearing b'cuz I'm thinking seriously about the movies I like, to be able to answer this question. But I just didn't want to give you my list without telling you why.

 

I've read your posts where you speak of Hitchcock's earlier British films. Me...I like my Hitchy when he goes Hollywood. The irony in Hitchcock?s endings are killer. Sometimes it?s the situ-ation... sometimes it?s just a line or a gesture. Sometimes it's the next to the last scene. These are my favorite endings, Miss Goddess. Oh, I might be using the word tension a lot:

 

(10.) "MARNIE" - SEAN CONNERY, TIPPI HEDREN.

 

This used to be one of my favorite Hitchcock movies when I was a teenager. I like the ending b'cuz it kind of falls flat after all the psychosexual kleptomaniacal machinations Marnie goes through. When Connery figures out Tippi's mystery and all is solved, they stand outside her mother's house and Marnie says to Mark that she doesn't want to go to jail, "I'd rather be with you." (HUH?) I have to laugh...at...this...happy...ending???

 

(9.) "REAR WINDOW" - JAMES STEWART, GRACE KELLY, RAYMOND BURR.

 

HA!! James Stewart is right back where he started...incapacitated with now two broken legs. I love the slo-mo extreme close-up of Grace?s and Jimmy?s kiss. (Thank you Hitch!) But I like the ending. She gives away our secret, ladies. Yes...we may feign being interested in what our man loves to do, but underneath it all...is a fashion magazine.

 

(8.) "DIAL M FOR MURDER" - RAY MILLAND, GRACE KELLY, ROBERT CUMMINGS.

 

Boy, those wacky Brits. They can commit murder most foul and when caught they say: "Pip pip cheerio, well-played my good man.? The key to this ending is...the key. Milland is caught b?cuz he uses the right key. He goes to his bar for one last drink. And the triumphant John Williams combs his mustache. Elementary my dear Hitchcock!

 

(7.) "NORTH BY NORTHWEST" - CARY GRANT, EVA MARIE SAINT, JAMES MASON.

 

This time Hitchcock Blonde duty is served by Eva Marie Saint; she's so sophisticated and mea-sured. The Mount Rushmore motif is thrilling. And Hitch?s leap of having Cary Grant pull Eva Marie Saint up from the gargantuan mountain face into his bed is very romantic to me and a

good cinematic joke.

 

Girls, wouldn?t you risk a mountain if you?re assured the end result could be Cary Grant??? :x

 

(6.) "THE BIRDS" - TIPPI HEDREN, ROD TAYLOR, SUZANNE PLESHETTE.

 

Forget those radiated giant ants, scorpions, tarantulas, gila monsters and half-naked fifty foot men. Only my little Hitchy could turn Nature against Mankind. Ohhhh, the tension of Rod having to get everyone into the car as the birds just sit there. It was like being on pins and needles. We watch the car slowly drive away. The frame is filled with all types of birds. No music score in the movie. Only Hitch makes me believe that Nature turning against us could be a real possibility. And wouldn?t Man deserve it? And the kicker in ?THE BIRDS?...there is no real explanation. Spooky.

 

(5.) "SHADOW OF A DOUBT" - JOSEPH COTTEN, TERESA WRIGHT.

 

The whole idea of young Charlie being her family?s protector is great to me. And then the tables turn and she?s stalked by her Uncle. The struggle on the train...whew! In the end, as the town pays its respect at Uncle Charlie?s funeral, young Charlie and her detective man stand outside the church...knowing the truth. Santa Clara is safe. What does she say about things or people going a little crazy. Like Uncle Charlie. Their tone and body language could be talking about the price of corn.

 

(4.) "SABOTEUR" - ROBERT CUMMINGS, PRISCILLA LANE.

 

Yeah, I know he?s a pinhead, but I do like them both as a Hitchcock couple. They?re both so darned typically American. I like that. As the seams slowly split apart on Norman Lloyd?s jacket, Hitch creates tension. Oh my god, I don't really want him to fall. But he does. Hitchcock is right. Life is sometimes held together...by a thread.

 

(3.) "NOTORIOUS" - CARY GRANT, INGRID BERGMAN, CLAUDE RAINS.

 

Cary?s tarnished armor ultimately shines brightly as he finally rescues his girlfriend from a hot-

bed of Nazis while her husband follows impotently along. Claude?s fate is sealed when Cary locks the car door. And Claude?s final ?mincing? steps as he walks back up to the mansion says it all. The door shuts. THE END.

 

(Dammmmmmmmit Hitch. How can you make me feel sorry for the bad guys?)

 

(2.) "PSYCHO" - ANTHONY PERKINS, JANET LEIGH.

 

("They'll see and they'll say: 'why she wouldn?t even hurt a fly.' ?)

 

...And then Hitch dissolves to the car that poor Marion Crane lies dead in, as they pull it from the swamp. $40,000 is bundled in a newspaper next to her body. For me, "PSYCHO" is my perfect motion picture from its title, its casting, its turn of events. (Love Lurene Tuttle too).

 

But my absolute favorite Hitchcock ending packs an emotional wallop.

 

(1.) "VERTIGO" - JAMES STEWART, KIM NOVAK.

 

James Stewart presses and pokes and prods and pushes and pulls...until he loses his love once more. His arms are slightly outstretched at his sides as he looks over the side of the tower. He is doomed. Hitchcock's most cruel and ironic joke. Scroll down and look at this last photo of Kim in her white coat:

 

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=152281&start=0&tstart=0

 

Stewart might as well jump himself.

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Konway! :)

 

> {quote:title=konway87 wrote:}{quote}

> SPOILERS

>

> Here are my top 10 endings.

>

> 1) Foreign Correspondent (1940)

> 2) Rope (1948)

> 3) Saboteur (1942)

> 4) The Paradine Case (1947)

> 5) Psycho (1960)

> 6) Vertigo (1958)

> 7) Marnie (1964)

> 8) Waltzes from Vienna (1934)

> 9) The Birds (1963)

> 10) Notorious (1946)

>

 

Great list...and you even included Waltzes from Vienna!

I remember you're a big fan of The Paradine Case.

 

So is the ending of Foreign Correspondent so strong to you because of the plane crash and the special effects, or some other reason (like how emotional it was)?

 

 

> I don't know if anyone knows this - Hitchcock wanted to end Strangers on a Train with Guy saying "Bruno, Bruno Anthony - a clever fellow." But the studio forced him to shoot a happy ending.

 

I did not know this. That would be an odd ending, it kind of bespeaks admiration for Bruno, depending on how Granger spoke it and what emphasis he placed on the words.

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Hi CineMaven! You really showed you are the "maven" around here with that

terrific list and I'm very, very glad you took the time to tell us why you chose

those film endings.

 

>

> I've read your posts where you speak of Hitchcock's earlier British films. Me...I like my Hitchy when he goes Hollywood. The irony in Hitchcocks endings are killer. Sometimes its the situ-ation... sometimes its just a line or a gesture. Sometimes it's the next to the last scene. These are my favorite endings, Miss Goddess. Oh, I might be using the word tension a lot:

>

 

Those movies are his best known---for very good reason. Proceed, Madame Mave!

 

> (10.) "MARNIE" - SEAN CONNERY, TIPPI HEDREN.

>

> This used to be one of my favorite Hitchcock movies when I was a teenager. I like the ending b'cuz it kind of falls flat after all the psychosexual kleptomaniacal machinations Marnie goes through. When Connery figures out Tippi's mystery and all is solved, they stand outside her mother's house and Marnie says to Mark that she doesn't want to go to jail, "I'd rather be with you." (HUH?) I have to laugh...at...this...happy...ending???

>

 

She goes home with Sean Connery! Yes! That's a happy ending! :D

 

 

> (9.) "REAR WINDOW" - JAMES STEWART, GRACE KELLY, RAYMOND BURR.

>

> HA!! James Stewart is right back where he started...incapacitated with now two broken legs. I love the slo-mo extreme close-up of Graces and Jimmys kiss. (Thank you Hitch!) But I like the ending. She gives away our secret, ladies. Yes...we may feign being interested in what our man loves to do, but underneath it all...is a fashion magazine.

>

 

Hahaaaa! Hitch certainly knew Lisa Carol wasn't going to change that much! Nor would he want her to.

 

> (8.) "DIAL M FOR MURDER" - RAY MILLAND, GRACE KELLY, ROBERT CUMMINGS.

>

> Boy, those wacky Brits. They can commit murder most foul and when caught they say: Pip pip cheerio, well-played my good man. The key to this ending is...the key. Milland is caught bcuz he uses the right key. He goes to his bar for one last drink. And the triumphant John Williams combs his mustache. Elementary my dear Hitchcock!

>

 

Part of why I like Milland so much in this movie is how gracefully he accepts defeat. In fact, I never actually admired (liked, yes, not admired) his character until that last scene.

 

> (6.) "THE BIRDS" - TIPPI HEDREN, ROD TAYLOR, SUZANNE PLESHETTE.

>

> Forget those radiated giant ants, scorpions, tarantulas, gila monsters and half-naked fifty foot men. Only my little Hitchy could turn Nature against Mankind. Ohhhh, the tension of Rod having to get everyone into the car as the birds just sit there. It was like being on pins and needles. We watch the car slowly drive away. The frame is filled with all types of birds. No music score in the movie. Only Hitch makes me believe that Nature turning against us could be a real possibility. And wouldnt Man deserve it? And the kicker in THE BIRDS...there is no real explanation. Spooky.

>

 

Wonderful! This one is high on my list of favorite endings, too, and you 'splained why better than I could.

 

 

 

> (5.) "SHADOW OF A DOUBT" - JOSEPH COTTEN, TERESA WRIGHT.

>

> The whole idea of young Charlie being her familys protector is great to me. And then the tables turn and shes stalked by her Uncle. The struggle on the train...whew! In the end, as the town pays its respect at Uncle Charlies funeral, young Charlie and her detective man stand outside the church...knowing the truth. Santa Clara is safe. What does she say about things or people going a little crazy. Like Uncle Charlie. Their tone and body language could be talking about the price of corn.

>

 

That was well said. Their matter-of-fact tone belies the seriousness and implications of everything they've just gone through. Maybe the rest of Santa Clara can return to normal, but these two folks will never really be the same.

 

> (4.) "SABOTEUR" - ROBERT CUMMINGS, PRISCILLA LANE.

>

> Yeah, I know hes a pinhead, but I do like them both as a Hitchcock couple. Theyre both so darned typically American. I like that. As the seams slowly split apart on Norman Lloyds jacket, Hitch creates tension. Oh my god, I don't really want him to fall. But he does. Hitchcock is right. Life is sometimes held together...by a thread.

>

 

That was great! You need to show that to Norman Lloyd.

 

 

>

> (Dammmmmmmmit Hitch. How can you make me feel sorry for the bad guys?)

>

 

Claude Rains with those sad eyes...

 

 

>

> But my absolute favorite Hitchcock ending packs an emotional wallop.

>

> (1.) "VERTIGO" - JAMES STEWART, KIM NOVAK.

>

> James Stewart presses and pokes and prods and pushes and pulls...until he loses his love once more. His arms are slightly outstretched at his sides as he looks over the side of the tower. He is doomed. Hitchcock's most cruel and ironic joke. Scroll down and look at this last photo of Kim in her white coat:

>

> http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=152281&start=0&tstart=0

>

> Stewart might as well jump himself.

 

:) That one is my favorite, too. It is the most emotional of all his film endings, to me. You just feel so devastated, like you've gone through a battle and just took one last bullet.

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Wow, I'm amazed how many early Hitch titles are on your list. Seven of them. I don't even remember the endings to most of them.

 

Hitch was very ambitious with his 30s endings, particularly with Number Seventeen, Secret Agent, and Rich and Strange. They are the "crash" endings, ala Foreign Correspondent.

 

Blackmail is similar to Saboteur and North by Northwest. It's the "spectacular" with a setting playing a role.

 

The ending to the original The Man Who Knew Too Much is a rarity with Hitch. It's a gangster shootout. And it's with Peter Lorre! That alone makes it fascinating to me.

 

Young and Innocent is a classic "unmasking" along the lines of The 39 Steps. Even The Manxman is kind of this.

 

Murder! is the most shocking Hitch ending, in my eyes. It stuns me.

 

So, are the endings to the top listed titles big reasons why those films are favorites?

 

It helps those films, surely, but I wouldn't say they are big reasons. Of the ones on my list, I'd say Murder! and The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) are the ones where the ending was better than the film. Number Seventeen and Secret Agent have jarring endings. They kind of come out of nowhere. The former is so very slow throughout but ends fast.

 

I know you've said Psycho was your very favorite.

 

It is. I like it from start to finish. It's such a unique film in that the story focus completely shifts. I find that to be breathtaking. It's basically two films in one.

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I taped an evening of early Hitchcock sound films. I have seen "Blackmail" but I had better get cracking on the others if I'm not going to be left out.

 

My favorite ending is "Psycho." Hitchcock seemed, on several occasions, to have open ended endings. "Psycho" and "The Birds" seem to me that way. Even "Vertigo" ends almost too abruptly.

 

Enjoying reading all you smart people.

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SPOILERS

 

I find Foreign Correspondent's ending very powerful. Its a film with no big stars. And I thought Joel MCrea did a great job playing the role. And the final speech by Haverstock ("Hello America, Hang on to your lights") take the film into much more stronger level. I like The Paradine Case, because of James Bridie's line at the end of the film - "Incidentally darling, you do need a shave." The original cut of The Paradine Case was a much more stronger film. Ethel Barrymore's performance was absolutely brilliant in Original Cut. That's why she was nominated for an Oscar. But Selznick replaced some of her scenes with his silly retakes. I think the film would have been one of Hitchcock's best films if Robert Newton was cast as William Marsh (Andre Latour in the film).

 

Hitchcock wanted the valet to be a manure smelling stable hand.

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Check out your favorite Stars of Yesterday and Today ... when they were still in School!

 

[Robert Deniro|http://www.celebrityschoolpics.com/celebrity/000026/robert-deniro/]

 

[Humphrey Bogart|http://www.celebrityschoolpics.com/celebrity/001180/humphrey-bogart/]

 

[Dean Martin|http://www.celebrityschoolpics.com/celebrity/001491/dean-martin/]

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The interesting thing is both sides of the controversy had their good and bad points, so it was not all melodrama.

 

And what is Hornblower's good point?

 

I hadn't realized Edmund Gwenn went so far back with Hitch, and he has one of the largest roles in the picture as Hornblower, the greedy land grabber.

 

I agree. His scenes are the best in the film. It was interesting to see Gwenn play a "villain." I've only known him as the gentle old man.

 

In fact he, and the lady whose past becomes a key issue, played by Phyllis Konstam, were an intriguing "team" so to speak. He seemed quite attached to her, as much as to his sons,

 

Great point. And I really liked that he cared about Chloe.

 

who, like the spawn of the other faction, the Hillcrists, seemed less vivid and defined than their parents, if more open minded.

 

Yes, very much so. The Hillcrists were rather repressed.

 

As for the Hillcrists, that Mrs Hillcrist was something else! Wow, don't get on HER bad side, she pulls no punches for a "lady". Loved her character, though, played by the interestingly named Helen Haye (without the "s").

 

She was terrific. Tough as nails. Icy, icy, icy. I liked when Chloe wanted her approval at the auction but the Mrs. just blew her off. Powerful. It felt like me with you. :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> The interesting thing is both sides of the controversy had their good and bad points, so it was not all melodrama.

>

> And what is Hornblower's good point?

>

 

When he first comes to try to buy that piece of land and explains his motives, he's rather sincere. He's worked hard and yet he's always been snubbed by the likes of the Hillcrists...he wants to genuinely better his standing and his family, in particular. He's very wounded by the slights which the Hillcrists have visited on his children, and takes it very personally. I felt for him. It's just that like a lot of people, he cloaked underlying greed and desire to punish people like the Hillcrists with a mania for "progress". It even led him to inhumane extremes which the Hillcrists themselves were not guilty of (that we are aware of).

 

> I agree. His scenes are the best in the film. It was interesting to see Gwenn play a "villain." I've only known him as the gentle old man.

>

 

Hitch made him an assassin in Foreign Correspondent. It's only in Hitch I see him cast against type.

 

>

> Great point. And I really liked that he cared about Chloe.

>

 

Yes, and he was truly appalled at the way the Hillcrists snubbed her.

 

 

> who, like the spawn of the other faction, the Hillcrists, seemed less vivid and defined than their parents, if more open minded.

>

> Yes, very much so. The Hillcrists were rather repressed.

>

 

They're a "Petrified Forest". Yet, still more humane than Hornblower. It's interesting, because, like Ford, Hitch doesn't outright condemn either "class". He knows the inevitably "progress" comes at a cost and though the older, establishment have their myopia and rigidness, they also had more humanity in many ways. That's what I find fascinating about the film, there is no real "villain".

 

> She was terrific. Tough as nails. Icy, icy, icy. I liked when Chloe wanted her approval at the auction but the Mrs. just blew her off. Powerful. It felt like me with you. :P

 

Spare me!

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