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The World of Alfred Hitchcock


MissGoddess
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When he first comes to try to buy that piece of land and explains his motives, he's rather sincere. He's worked hard and yet he's always been snubbed by the likes of the Hillcrists...he wants to genuinely better his standing and his family, in particular. He's very wounded by the slights which the Hillcrists have visited on his children, and takes it very personally. I felt for him. It's just that like a lot of people, he cloaked underlying greed and desire to punish people like the Hillcrists with a mania for "progress". It even led him to inhumane extremes which the Hillcrists themselves were not guilty of (that we are aware of).

 

You're right, he's a self-made man and that is to be admired. But he's crossed the line from looking to improve his standing and helping his family to purposely harming others in the name of "progress," but it's purely about greed and power.

 

Hitch made him an assassin in Foreign Correspondent. It's only in Hitch I see him cast against type.

 

Oh, I forgot about that one. Good call.

 

Yes, and he was truly appalled at the way the Hillcrists snubbed her.

 

Right. He was looking to comfort her.

 

They're a "Petrified Forest". Yet, still more humane than Hornblower.

 

Nicely said!

 

It's interesting, because, like Ford, Hitch doesn't outright condemn either "class". He knows the inevitably "progress" comes at a cost and though the older, establishment have their myopia and rigidness, they also had more humanity in many ways. That's what I find fascinating about the film, there is no real "villain".

 

There are villains, at least to me. Hornblower starts it off with his looking to do in the Hillcrests, even going back on his word to them. Then Mrs. Hillcrest plays dirty pool, dragging his daughter-in-law through the mud. And then you've got Dawker (Edward Chapman), who is looking to line his pockets and protect his hide.

 

Spare me!

 

That's what Mrs. Hillcrest said to Chloe!

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>

> You're right, he's a self-made man and that is to be admired. But he's crossed the line from looking to improve his standing and helping his family to purposely harming others in the name of "progress," but it's purely about greed and power.

>

 

Yes, he's the face of the "corporate" future.

 

> There are villains, at least to me. Hornblower starts it off with his looking to do in the Hillcrests, even going back on his word to them. Then Mrs. Hillcrest plays dirty pool, dragging his daughter-in-law through the mud. And then you've got Dawker (Edward Chapman), who is looking to line his pockets and protect his hide.

>

 

But they are most of them shown to have their good points, too. Mrs Hillcrist is just as upset over the eviction of those tenants as her husband. Dawker is unscrupulous, but even he seems to have some humanity. No one comes off scott free except maybe the boring kids. But they don't seem to take much of a stand either way. They whine about what should be done but do little themselves about changing things.

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Yes, he's the face of the "corporate" future.

 

Definitely. He's aggressive greed. And you get the idea the Hillcrests are heritage. They are living off the money and name of their ancestors.

 

But they are most of them shown to have their good points, too.

 

I agree with you. No one is purely black.

 

Mrs Hillcrist is just as upset over the eviction of those tenants as her husband.

 

Yes, but is it because of the tenants or because Hornblower has broken his word to them?

 

Dawker is unscrupulous, but even he seems to have some humanity.

 

He just goes where the money is. He's basically on the Hillcrest side, though.

 

No one comes off scott free except maybe the boring kids. But they don't seem to take much of a stand either way. They whine about what should be done but do little themselves about changing things.

 

What could they do? They are powerless. They can only "whine."

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> Definitely. He's aggressive greed. And you get the idea the Hillcrests are heritage. They are living off the money and name of their ancestors.

>

 

Yes! They, or rather, he, did not earn one farthing, any more than their children will.

 

>

> Yes, but is it because of the tenants or because Hornblower has broken his word to them?

>

 

I hadn't thought about that angle. I'd have to watch again. I thought I saw her seem to hesitate over some of her worst moments.

 

>

> He just goes where the money is. He's basically on the Hillcrest side, though.

>

 

He almost gave in to the temptations of Chloe, though. You could see, like Mrs Hillcrist, how he hesitates.

 

> What could they do? They are powerless. They can only "whine."

 

Oh, so all rich kids are powerless. Interesting. They'll be glad to hear they're off the hook.

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I thought I saw her seem to hesitate over some of her worst moments.

 

I'm with ya. I don't think she was all evil. She definitely felt bad about Chloe at the end of the film. Speaking of which, where is your "Hitch ending" list?

 

He almost gave in to the temptations of Chloe, though. You could see, like Mrs Hillcrist, how he hesitates.

 

He can be pushed around, yes.

 

Oh, so all rich kids are powerless. Interesting. They'll be glad to hear they're off the hook.

 

Jill spoke up. Her love interest was less brave. I don't think he disagreed with his father, though. That's why he didn't say anything.

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> I'm with ya. I don't think she was all evil. She definitely felt bad about Chloe at the end of the film. Speaking of which, where is your "Hitch ending" list?

>

 

I'm still working on it. I don't remember endings of several films, so it could change as I revisit them. I can't remember the ending of Murder! and yet I do remember liking it quite a lot. Crazy.

 

> Jill spoke up. Her love interest was less brave. I don't think he disagreed with his father, though. That's why he didn't say anything.

 

They were boring washouts. Jill was okay, but rather stodgy.

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I'm still working on it. I don't remember endings of several films, so it could change as I revisit them. I can't remember the ending of Murder! and yet I do remember liking it quite a lot. Crazy.

 

Ohhhhh, you'd hate that one.

 

They were boring washouts. Jill was okay, but rather stodgy.

 

Jill was idealistic. Hornblower's boys were looking to follow in his shoes, it's just they weren't as ruthless.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> But she also didn't seem to think badly of her parents' snubbing Chloe.

>

> I think she feared her mother. She seemed very comfortable with her father. Did she call him "Dodo"?

 

Yes, ha! I'm trying to remember who else used that nickname in a movie...I can hear and see a blonde, 1930s actress saying that word...was it in another Hitch movie? Oh, this is going to drive me crazy.....

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Cinemaven -

 

Your endings list was out of this world! You completely nailed every movie, and why the endings are so satisfying, or maybe why they are NOT satisfying.... this is the crux of Hitch to me - his refusal to tie everything up in a neat bow for the audience. Even when he seems to, has he really?

 

I've started my list:

 

1. Night Must Fall....... D'OH!

 

I better start over.

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As you all know, Hitchcock wanted Anthony Perkins to play the role of Professor Armstrong. But the studio forced Hitchcock to cast Paul Newman. In my opinion, Perkins would have done a brilliant job playing the role of Professor Armstrong. What do you think about it, everyone?

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I think so too. Perkins could be very romantic. I find the discussions between Professor Lindt and Professor Armstrong at the chalkboard to be very dull. I think discussions between Lindt and Armstrong would have been much more interesting if Perkins was playing the role. And there would have been a feel of humor if Perkins was playing the role.

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Here's my rather conventional list of favorite Hitchcock endings. I can't write as inspiringly as you did, T-Mave. So I refer everyone to her post for those movies we like in common.

 

1. *Vertigo* - The most impactful, emotional ending in Hitch's works. The ending haunts me long after the film is over, no matter how often I see it.

 

2. *The Birds* - The eeriest of endings, it feels very scary and threatening, the whole world suddenly looking malevolent. Brilliant use of sound, too.

 

3. *Notorious* - It's true, you almost feel sorry for Claude Rains with those sad, frightened eyes getting locked out of the getaway car. Face the music and dance to it, Alex!

 

4. *Lifeboat* - Oh no, not again!!! Another unexpected twist before the end that I never foresee, no matter how often I watch.

 

5. *Rear Window* - Maybe the cutest Hitchcock ending and clever in that is wraps up all the little separate "stories" in the other apartments before getting to Lisa and Jeff.

 

6. *North by Northwest* - Clever segue from Lincoln's nose ( :) ) to the train compartment.

 

7. *To Catch a Thief* - Hilarious! A thief is caught not by the police, but by marriage and a mother-in-law.

 

8. Dial "M" For Murder - My favorite Hitchcock villain. And mainly because he's so gallant as a loser. Wonder if he was so calm when lost a tennis match?

 

9. *The Man Who Knew Too Much* (1956) - Hitch ratchets up the suspense to such a high pitch and then plops you down with an abruptly comic thud. The very unexpectedness makes it memorable to me. I never remember it's going to end that way. Most people would have ended on the little boy rushing to his mother's arms.

 

10. *Mr. and Mrs. Smith* - Naughty! Naughty!

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