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The World of Alfred Hitchcock


MissGoddess
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So let me understand this...who is "orchestrating" all these events...the director? Is he represented at all? Is he "fate" or something? Or do you see it just as an allegory, with everything and everyone symbolizing something? Like Mitch is "man" and nature is "mother" and the other female characters are all different aspects of a woman's life?

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So let me understand this...who is "orchestrating" all these events...the director? Is he represented at all? Is he "fate" or something? Or do you see it just as an allegory, with everything and everyone symbolizing something? Like Mitch is "man" and nature is "mother" and the other female characters are all different aspects of a woman's life?

 

Love can have many effects on people. It's a "storm." Annie is holding out hope that Mitch will return to her. She's already "dead" but is afraid to face it. Lydia is afraid of losing Mitch. Her world will be drastically changed if Melanie wins Mitch's love. I believe she is the one who brings forth the wrath. She's the mother. She's Mother Nature. The birds turn still at the end because Lydia has come to accept Melanie. Melanie is put through heck because she's the one who has stirred the pot. She's fallen in love with Mitch and it's a real kind of love, not a passing fancy. Does she have the strength to commit to Mitch? Can she go through "heck" for him?

 

Does a man stick by his woman (wife) or does he side with mom? Mitch and Melanie are the ones who are bludgeoned. Mitch was with Melanie.

 

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>

> Love can have many effects on people. It's a "storm." Annie is holding out hope that Mitch will return to her. She's already "dead" but is afraid to face it. Lydia is afraid of losing Mitch. Her world will be drastically changed if Melanie wins Mitch's love. I believe she is the one who brings forth the wrath. She's the mother. She's Mother Nature. The birds turn still at the end because Lydia has come to accept Melanie. Melanie is put through heck because she's the one who has stirred the pot. She's fallen in love with Mitch and it's a real kind of love, not a passing fancy. Does she have the strength to commit to Mitch? Can she go through "heck" for him?

>

> Does a man stick by his woman (wife) or does he side with mom? Mitch and Melanie are the ones who are bludgeoned. Mitch was with Melanie.

>

 

I have to give you credit, that was pretty darned good. I would have scoffed at this kind of analysis and conjecture about what I always viewed as a "technically experimental" film of Hitch's. I'm glad to look at it in this new way.

 

Do you really believe Hitch intended it this way? That he thought about EASY VIRTUE in relation to it? Are there any other films of his you see this symbolically? What about SPELLBOUND? Peck seems to go through a similar trial by fire that Melanie Daniels does, except he was cracked before he met Constance.

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I have to give you credit, that was pretty darned good. I would have scoffed at this kind of analysis and conjecture about what I always viewed as a "technically experimental" film of Hitch's. I'm glad to look at it in this new way.

 

Thank you.

 

Do you really believe Hitch intended it this way?

 

I do, yes. Why would Hitch go to the trouble to develop a story about a mother, a potential wife, and an ex? Why the lovebirds? If I didn't lose steam with my scene analysis, I believe I could have shown more examples of the story. For example, Melanie is not close to her mother.

 

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That he thought about EASY VIRTUE in relation to it?

 

Now that's something I'm not sure about. Melanie just reminds me of "easy virtue." She's being judged.

 

Are there any other films of his you see this symbolically?

 

Well, you know about Vertigo. Hitch often sneaks in symbolism in his films. You mentioned a few in your favorite endings list, such as To Catch a Thief and the endings to Mr. and Mrs. Smith and North by Northwest.

 

What about SPELLBOUND? Peck seems to go through a similar trial by fire that Melanie Daniels does, except he was cracked before he met Constance.

 

I believe Spellbound is all about Constance (Ingrid Bergman). And, yes, that film has quite a bit of symbolism. Much of it is sexual, since Constance is a repressed woman who finds herself aroused by John (Gregory Peck). It's an "awakening" film. Melanie Daniels is also awakened, just in a different way.

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>

> I do, yes. Why would Hitch go to the trouble to develop a story about a mother, a potential wife, and an ex? Why the lovebirds? If I didn't lose steam with my scene analysis, I believe I could have shown more examples of the story. For example, Melanie is not close to her mother.

>

 

Boy, mothers sure get it in Hitch's films.

 

> Now that's something I'm not sure about. Melanie just reminds me of "easy virtue." She's being judged.

>

 

Yes, that's true; that scene in the diner almost plays like a tribunal. Melanie is a threat, a "witch" to be burned to save the "village" from evil.

 

> Well, you know about Vertigo. Hitch often sneaks in symbolism in his films. You mentioned a few in your favorite endings list, such as To Catch a Thief and the endings to Mr. and Mrs. Smith and North by Northwest.

>

 

I see the symbolism in isolated instances like you describe above, but I mean a film that is in it's whole concept, symbolic.

 

> I believe Spellbound is all about Constance (Ingrid Bergman). And, yes, that film has quite a bit of symbolism. Much of it is sexual, since Constance is a repressed woman who finds herself aroused by John (Gregory Peck). It's an "awakening" film. Melanie Daniels is also awakened, just in a different way.

 

Why is Peck the one who's tortured?

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Boy, mothers sure get it in Hitch's films.

 

Definitely!

 

Yes, that's true; that scene in the diner almost plays like a tribunal. Melanie is a threat, a "witch" to be burned to save the "village" from evil.

 

Exactly. It's Melanie's fault for disrupting their happy "family."

 

I see the symbolism in isolated instances like you describe above, but I mean a film that is in it's whole concept, symbolic.

 

I'd say Vertigo is pretty close. It's about male obsessiveness with something female.

 

Why is Peck the one who's tortured?

 

You know, I really haven't analyzed that aspect of Spellbound. His weakness pushes Connie to be strong. She's fallen hard for him. So hard that she's willing to abandon her "beliefs" for him. She's certainly spellbound. In a way, Spellbound is the female version of Vertigo.

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> I'd say Vertigo is pretty close. It's about male obsessiveness with something female.

>

 

I'm sure you're right, though I always saw it as a love story.

 

>

> You know, I really haven't analyzed that aspect of Spellbound. His weakness pushes Connie to be strong. She's fallen hard for him. So hard that she's willing to abandon her "beliefs" for him. She's certainly spellbound. In a way, Spellbound is the female version of Vertigo.

 

I guess, though she's more like his keeper and caretaker than his lover.

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I'm sure you're right, though I always saw it as a love story.

 

Well, many of us guys think of it as love. :D

 

I guess, though she's more like his keeper and caretaker than his lover.

 

Yes, and I'm someone who believes this is a female turn-on. But don't be fooled, Constance wants it all.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I'm sure you're right, though I always saw it as a love story.

>

> Well, many of us guys think of it as love. :D

>

 

Never mind.

 

> I guess, though she's more like his keeper and caretaker than his lover.

>

> Yes, and I'm someone who believes this is a female turn-on. But don't be fooled, Constance wants it all.

 

I know, I do believe she's truly in love. She's finding out life isn't all it's depicted in books, not even shrink books.

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Never mind.

 

Yeah, that's usually how it works. No mind needed.

 

I know, I do believe she's truly in love.

 

It's not just love with Constance, either. This is why I see it as the female version of Vertigo.

 

She's finding out life isn't all it's depicted in books, not even shrink books.

 

You got it. What happens when someone really stimulates you? Now what do you do?

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>

> It's not just love with Constance, either. This is why I see it as the female version of Vertigo.

>

 

It's the same to me.

 

 

> She's finding out life isn't all it's depicted in books, not even shrink books.

>

> You got it. What happens when someone really stimulates you? Now what do you do?

 

Go to a shrink, quick, or you'll need one after. :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> It's the same to me.

>

> What is?

 

 

Never mind.

 

 

>

> Go to a shrink, quick, or you'll need one after.

>

> For a loon like you, yes! :P

 

Right! I'm talking to you!

 

What about MARNIE? Is that about male obsessiveness or mother problems?

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