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What Are You Listening To?


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It's 1963.

I'm standing in front of a movie theatre, with my family and grandparents, amongst a large crowd watching a parade. But, I am not watching the parade. Instead, I am longingly gazing at the poster for The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock starring My Favorite Person in the Whole Wide World: Lou Costello.

It's a warm, summer day. I am eight years old, without a care in the world. The Cuban Missile Crisis had passed. "Camelot" was still in full flower. All was right with the world.

And somebody in the throng had a transistor radio playing this tune .  .  .

 

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1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

somebody in the throng had a transistor radio playing this tune .  .  .

Your whole memory is wonderful... I'm a few years younger, I turned 2 years old November 1, 1963.  So, I wasn't even two that summer...What a glorious summer that must have been.  That's a favorite recording of NAT KING COLE.  Gorgeous. 

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1 minute ago, Allhallowsday said:

Your whole memory is wonderful... I'm a few years younger, I turned 2 years old November 1, 1963.  So, I wasn't even two that summer...What a glorious summer that must have been.  That's a favorite recording of NAT KING COLE.  Gorgeous. 

Hey, thanks, Allhallowsday!

My compliments to you on your eclectic and expansive taste in music.

I think the memory of that day in 1963 will be with me when I'm on my deathbed.

Generalization Alert: Nostalgia is a wonderful thing. Childhood memories tend to be rosy, blissful, and idealized . . . precisely because a child has not yet experienced life's traumas, trials and tribulations, and tragedies.

Just eleven days after "That Sunday, That Summer" peaked at Number 3 on Billboard's charts and twenty-one days after your birth,  Camelot came to an abrupt, shocking, and tragic end; America was violently shoved into a new era;  and something in the American spirit . . . died.

One year later the world really changed!

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Another musical trip down Memory Lane, this one set during, roughly, the same time period as my previous reminiscence.

I'm sitting in the kitchen, at the breakfast table, eating Rice Krispies.

Accompanying the snap, crackle, pop of that toothsome ambrosia gifted from Battle Creek, Michigan is The Bob Crane Show on KNX radio in Los Angeles. As I recall, Crane spun "middle of the road" (MOR) tunes such as Sukiyaki by Kyu Sakamoto and Can't Get Used to Losing You by Andy Williams.

. . . and this peppy tune, jauntily vocalized by the arguable masters of the "Go sound." Whenever I dig into a bowl of Kellogg's Rice Krispies, it always pops into my head.

 

 

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In today's "New Prohibition" era when hypersensitive ninnies; hypervigilant hall monitors; and desiccated, eternally hostile feminists foam at the mouth, cluck their tongues, gnash their teeth, and tremulously clutch their pearls over "Baby, It's Cold Outside," I suspect that this "pervy" ditty (from The Most Happy Fella) is on the Cancel Culture's Hit Parade.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Long sigh... deep breath... nobody wears pearls anymore... ;) 

"Standin' On The Corner" is not only SO correct, as in nature, it's practically biological.  :rolleyes:

Thank you, Captain Obvious (and I mean that in the nicest possible way! 😉)!

"Brother you can't go to jail for what you're thinking
Or for that woo look in your eye
"

Well. Not yet. But, give Politically Correct Puritans time . . . .

Strange times when vulgarity such as WAP is freely performed on The GRAMMYs -- and broadcast during Prime Time when kiddies can watch -- but Baby, It's Cold Outside is considered beyond the pale and banned from American airwaves. O tempora! O mores!

 

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