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What Are You Listening To?


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I'm watching McCartney 3, 2, 1 on Hulu.

After The Beatles split up, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and George Harrison individually had successful music careers (Ringo proved himself a capable movie actor). But for me, the parts never equalled the whole. To me, their singular efforts are not as memorable and durable as their collective achievements -- their solo works certainly were not ground-breaking, revolutionary, and historic. Lennon and McCartney, I believe, did not surpass Lennon & McCartney.

Of all the evolutionary developments and stages that The Beatles went through during their surprisingly brief reign, I love and cherish their premiere, well-groomed, (relatively) clean-cut "Mop Top" phase when they pumped out infectious and exhilarating Pop hits such as this 1963 chart-topper.

 

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10 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Re: "After The Beatles split up, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and George Harrison individually had successful music careers (Ringo proved himself a capable movie actor). But for me, the parts never equalled the whole. To me, their singular efforts are not as memorable and durable as their collective achievements -- their solo works certainly were not ground-breaking, revolutionary, and historic. Lennon and McCartney, I believe, did not surpass Lennon & McCartney."

  I think it was John Lennon who said that if you want to know what the Beatles would've sounded like in the 1970s, listen to Paul McCartney...

 As far as milestones go, Paul & Linda McCartney's RAM (1971) is considered a precursor of the indie pop genre:     

 

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When I transitioned from vinyl records to compact discs and sold my records, I instantly cut loose the solo records by John Lennon and Ringo Starr. I held onto Paul McCartney's first two records and George Harrison's All Things Must Pass, but eventually they too were removed from my music library (although I still have Harrison's Wonderwall Music). Conversely, I kept all my Beatles records, which I still have.

 

 

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53 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

When I transitioned from vinyl records to compact discs and sold my records, I instantly cut loose the solo records by John Lennon and Ringo Starr. I held onto Paul McCartney's first two records and George Harrison's All Things Must Pass, but eventually they too were removed from my music library (although I still have Harrison's Wonderwall Music). Conversely, I kept all my Beatles records, which I still have.

 

 

 I like how you seem to have contrasted  both sides of the Wonderwall: the stiff upper lip of  "Red Lady Too" next to where George Harrison slept by that time.

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1 minute ago, NoShear said:

 I like how you seem to have contrasted  both sides of the Wonderwall: the stiff upper lip of  "Red Lady Too" next to where George Harrison slept by that time.

Actually I chose those two tracks because they are my favorites (i.e., really the only ones I like) on that album. The bulk of Wonderwall Music, I find it an "acquired taste." When I played George Harrison's solo debut for my grandmother, her critique was as follows:

"Sounds like cats yowling."

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12 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

1963 chart-topper

In the UK... it originally did so-so on USA charts but peaked at #3 USA nearly a year after initial release...

1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I instantly cut loose the solo records by John Lennon

PLASTIC ONO BAND ranks as one of the greatest Rock records by any artist. 

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3 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

In the UK... it originally did so-so on USA charts but peaked at #3 USA nearly a year after initial release...

PLASTIC ONO BAND ranks as one of the greatest Rock records by any artist. 

According to Wikipedia, "[Please Please Me] was released in the UK on 11 January 1963 and reached No. 1 on the New Musical Express and Melody Maker charts."

As for Plastic Ono Band . . .

Yeah, I don't care about the rankings of . . . well, anything. My tastes are not swayed or shaped by ratings, rankings, and others' opinions. I like what I like and don't like what I don't like.

During McCartney 3,2,1, Paul reports that Phil Spector criticized The Beatles for releasing two "A sides" on their 45 rpm singles. Believing that they were throwing away money, he urged them to pair an "A side" song with a "B side" song. McCartney disagreed. Because he and the other Beatles were record buyers, they would have felt cheated by Spector's mercenary strategy.

. . . apparently John, Paul, George, and Ringo had a change of heart when they coupled Let It Be with You Know My Name (Look Up the Number), a quirky, throwaway tune and, IMO, their worst song.

 

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7 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

According to Wikipedia, "[Please Please Me] was released in the UK on 11 January 1963 and reached No. 1 on the New Musical Express and Melody Maker charts."

Yeah, okay, and?  NME and Melody Maker are and were British magazines...  I wrote in the "UK"...

8 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

As for Plastic Ono Band . . .

Yeah, I don't care about the rankings of . . . well, anything. My tastes are not swayed or shaped by ratings, rankings, and others' opinions. I like what I like and don't like what I don't like.

Ratings?  I expressed my opinion, no "rankings" or "ratings" other than my own.   My favorite solo BEATLES record, easily. 

9 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

You Know My Name (Look Up the Number), a quirky, throwaway tune and, IMO, their worst song

Probably my favorite BEATLES...  :D

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16 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

Yeah, okay, and?  NME and Melody Maker are and were British magazines...  I wrote in the "UK"...

Ratings?  I expressed my opinion, no "rankings" or "ratings" other than my own.   My favorite solo BEATLES record, easily. 

Probably my favorite BEATLES...  :D

I admit this sentence confused me as well:  PLASTIC ONO BAND ranks as one of the greatest Rock records by any artist. 

 

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11 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

Yeah, okay, and?  NME and Melody Maker are and were British magazines...  I wrote in the "UK"...

Ratings?  I expressed my opinion, no "rankings" or "ratings" other than my own.   My favorite solo BEATLES record, easily. 

Probably my favorite BEATLES...  :D

Yeah, okay, and British Rock fans had better tastes than American Rock fans. 😉

You wrote "PLASTIC ONO BAND ranks as one of the greatest Rock records by any artist."

Ranks by who? You? Well, then make that opinion clear!

Well, there's no accounting for tastes, is there? 😜

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I admit this sentence confused me as well:  PLASTIC ONO BAND ranks as one of the greatest Rock records by any artist. 

 

I quoted each portion of Millstone's post I was responding to. 

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Just now, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Ranks by who? You? Well, then make that opinion clear!

Well, there's no accounting for tastes, is there?

Blah blah blah.  Nice tone.  Yes, it's my opinion.  I am sorry to confuse you regarding my re-use of your word "ranks" or "rates".  Yes, any opinion I express is my own.  PLASTIC ONO BAND is one of the greatest records in any category. 

We agree, though, on one point.  There is no accounting for taste. 

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11 hours ago, NoShear said:

As far as milestones go, Paul & Linda McCartney's RAM (1971) is considered a precursor of the indie pop genre

Sounds fair.  Back in the day I had all of PAUL's records through McCARTNEY 2 ( when I gave up ) and not Wildlife.  But when I transitioned also to CD, I ensured copies of three of PAUL's:   McCartney    Ram    Band On The Run...  I'm listening to Ram now. 

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9 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

IMO, their worst song

Listening now.  I have long loved that as a favorite BEATLES.  I bought a copy on vinyl of RARITIES around 1980 mainly to own it (not having that 45).  Maybe I love it because it's their worst song. 

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I had all of Paul McCartney's records up to Venus and Mars. Thereafter, his music just didn't grab me.

While reducing my McCartney collection -- and Rock 'n Roll records in general (my tastes were changing) -- I initially held onto his first two albums because they had songs and instrumentals ("Momma Miss America") that, for me, held up to repeated listening. "Maybe I'm Amazed," I thought, proved Paul McCartney was a strong enough songwriter to stand on his own. He didn't need The Beatles; indeed he could thrive to become, possibly, his generation's Cole Porter. "Maybe I'm Amazed" had Durable, Timeless Pop Standard written all over it, to my ears. I still consider it a damned excellent love song!

Ram further convinced me to "keep the faith" with McCartney. "Dear Boy" especially got a lot of needle-play on my stereo. His tunes were pleasing, satisfying, delightful "music to my ears" -- unlike John Lennon's music, which I sometimes found an effort and a challenge that I wasn't interested in making and taking*. McCartney's odd but beguiling "idiosyncracy" of offering brief ditties in media res on albums (e.g., "Her Majesty" on Abbey Road, and at the end of Ram On, a "coming attraction" of "Big Barn Bed," which would later appear on Red Rose Speedway) tickled my fancy.

His band Wings I never felt passionate about. I think I bought Band on the Run primarily because Christopher Lee was on the cover.

By the time Wings at the Speed of Sound was released, I was done with Paul McCartney's "silly love songs." A successful solo artist, he was still making the charts and "knockin' at the door."  But, I no longer wanted to let him in.

* When John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band was released, one critic described it as one, loud, long primal scream.

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10 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

* When John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band was released, one critic described it as one, loud, long primal scream.

And I thought you didn't care what any critic had to say...

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21 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

And I thought you didn't care what any critic had to say...

Hey, Man, you tryin' to bust my chops? 🤨 (he wrote with obligatory emoji to emphasize the proper light-hearted tone to avoid ruffled feathers).

I don't care! And I didn't care! Back then (50 years ago), anything Beatles-produced was critic-proof as far as I was concerned. If a Beatle opped-dray an urd-tay I was all over it.

Ummmmm. That's probably not the best figure of speech to use. Let me rephrase . . .

It didn't matter to me what critics said or wrote about John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. It was a record by a BEATLE! 'Nuff said!

The phrase "primal scream" (the definition of which I actually did not know at the time) used by the critic reviewing Lennon's solo debut indelibly stuck in my mind like doggie-doo on the bottom of a sho . . .

Oh forget it!

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