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5 minutes ago, NoShear said:

  Ah...

 Possibly Howard Roberts on the "Bell..." soundtrack as well, jamesjazzguitar? (The guitar sounds similar on both recordings.)

My guess is that it is Roberts on the "Bell" soundtrack since it sounds similar (and sounds like him),   and Roberts lived within miles of where the film was made and was known to get a lot of such work during the late 50s and into the 60s.

 

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Re: "My guess is that it is Roberts on the "Bell" soundtrack since it sounds similar (and sounds like him),   and Roberts lived within miles of where the film was made and was known to get a lot of such work during the late 50s and into the 60s."

 Presumably at least in part to your knowledge of Howard Roberts, jamesjazzguitar, Roberts shows up periodically on the boards, I've noticed, and I have learned of the other reason because of this - his prominence as a guitarist, of course!

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17 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Re: "My guess is that it is Roberts on the "Bell" soundtrack since it sounds similar (and sounds like him),   and Roberts lived within miles of where the film was made and was known to get a lot of such work during the late 50s and into the 60s."

 As he was not limited to "just" jazz backings - going on to session popular stuff, Howard Roberts made a case that he was THE session guitarist of the Americans - with Big Jim Sullivan making a similar case on the other side of the proverbial pond. 

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1 hour ago, NoShear said:

 As he was not limited to "just" jazz backings - going on to session popular stuff, Howard Roberts made a case that he was THE session guitarist of the Americans - with Big Jim Sullivan making a similar case on the other side of the proverbial pond. 

I'm fine with labeling Roberts THE session guitarist of his era.       He also founded the Guitar Institute of Technology in Hollywood.    

I saw Roberts live many times in West Hollywood jazz clubs.     It was a common joke among jazz musicians and jazz fans that Roberts would let-his-hair-down in these clubs;  I.e.  really let loose with his jazz chops since his-day-job was playing a lot of commercial,  corny,  session music.     Roberts was signed by Capital and made a lot of pop-jazz albums.   I call these pop-jazz since the songs were mostly pop songs and ran < 3-4 minutes.     

Later in his career Roberts put out an album called The Real Howard Roberts;   This was straight ahead jazz like the type I saw him play in those clubs.   

Roberts was a top notch jazz guitarist but he was also a business man which is rare for jazz musicians.  

     

 

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3 hours ago, NoShear said:

One of the most significant rock guitar-oriented albums of all, Van HaleN  is possibly the most important one to be released in the past fifty years or so

I would not argue against it, but one thing I KNOW for sure is I love that album!  A lot of times for a band, the first album is the best...

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5 hours ago, NoShear said:

 Bruce Springsteen's daughter, Jessica, is competing in Tokyo...

 Roy Bittan's shimmering keyboards are heard in BABY IT'S YOU (1983):     

 

 

 

I had that album. The grandiose arrangement and performance of the title tune, to me, had a kind of lush Broadway production-Phil Spector "Wall of Sound" vibe. It dynamically hooked me on Springsteen, impelling me to buy his earlier albums, Greetings from Asbury Park and The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle . . . which sounded nothing like Born to Run and which didn't thrill me*.

* Somewhat similar to a naif enjoying Hairspray and thinking, "Wow! I want to see more John Waters movies!"

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45 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

had that album. The grandiose arrangement and performance of the title tune, to me, had a kind of lush Broadway production-Phil Spector "Wall of Sound" vibe. It dynamically hooked me on Springsteen, impelling me to buy his earlier albums, Greetings from Asbury Park and The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle . . . which sounded nothing like Born to Run and which didn't thrill me*.

The only vinyl of SPRINGSTEEN I ever owned (except some 45 in the 80s) but I was not motivated by his art. 

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14 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

The only vinyl of SPRINGSTEEN I ever owned (except some 45 in the 80s) but I was not motivated by his art. 

I can relate. Springsteen seems to have attained a kind of divine status -- sort of the Carl Sandburg of Rock. I'm not knocking him. His music just doesn't move me.

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3 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

I enjoy that movie because of her. 

Yea,   what got me this time was the transition from "witch" to "human".    Her overall screen persona was a good fit for a cold,  can't cry,  can't fall in love,  "witch".    In the scenes where she does fall in love,  cries,  and thus loses her powers and is  now "human",    the transition was real to me and touching.    Hey,  it worked on the Steward character (he loved her and no love potion was involved),    and it worked on me as well.

 

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3 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

LOUIS ARMSTRONG Hot Fives, Vol. 1 

R-2300027-1369542847-4722.jpeg.jpg

 With both cinemaman's "James Bond Trivia" recent thread and yesterday's star in mind:     

 

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56 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 With both cinemaman's "James Bond Trivia" recent thread and yesterday's star in mind:     

 

I dig all of John Barry's themes for the James Bond movies. My favorite is his composition for On Her Majesty's Secret Service: (which also is my favorite James Bond thriller).

 

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20 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I dig all of John Barry's themes for the James Bond movies. My favorite is his composition for On Her Majesty's Secret Service: (which also is my favorite James Bond thriller).

 

It's interesting how relatively late this instrumental showed up in the franchise, yet, came to be a familiar James Bond theme as well.

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54 minutes ago, NoShear said:

It's interesting how relatively late this instrumental showed up in the franchise, yet, came to be a familiar James Bond theme as well.

Well, the first James Bond thriller, Dr. No, had an instrumental title theme.

Yeah, the producers decided to skip a title song sung by a popular recording artist for OHMSS. Maybe the title was too long or had too many syllables to put to lyrics.

I would have liked to have heard John Barry and Tim Rice try to use "Octopussy" in the theme song for that installment.

      And they call her Oc-to-pu$$y . . .

Tim Rice to John Barry: "Bloody hell! What the heck rhymes with Octopussy?"

* I should qualify my earlier statement about John Barry's James Bond themes. I love his theme song compositions for the Bond flicks with Sean Connery. After Diamonds Are Forever, the title songs just don't grab me -- ditto the Bond flicks post-Connery.

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