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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

What do you think of "Act Naturally"?

I like the C&W styled songs The Beatles recorded where Ringo sang,  like Honey Don't and Act Naturally.   One major personal reason is I can sing these songs.    I don't have the talent (or the nerve),  to sing John,  Paul,  or George lead parts,  but Ringo's range I can handle.    Act Naturally is a fun song and a perfect fit for Ringo:   reminds me of when he went off alone in A Hard Days Night,,,,  all sad-and-lonely.

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Act Naturally is a fun song and a perfect fit for Ringo:   reminds me of when he went off alone in A Hard Days Night,,,,  all sad-and-lonely.

Couldn't agree more.  Hardly the singer the other three were (JOHN particularly) RINGO was always my favorite BEATLE:)

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The Beatles - Revolver (The U.S. Album) - Amazon.com Music

Revolver by The Beatles-Aug 1966

This is the US version which omits 3 Lennon songs that were on the UK album-"I'm Only Sleeping, Dr Robert, And Your Bird Can Sing, these were included  and reviewed on Yesterday And Today. So here we get 5 songs by Paul, 3 by George, Ringo sings his usual 1 and John has only 2.  Just taking the album as is and it is still a brilliant work and among my top three favorites. George has the opening track "Taxman" a rocking swipe at British tax laws, some great guitar (by Paul) and George names names (Mr Wilson, Mr Heath). Paul comes in with "Eleanor Rigby" a poignant song about loneliness and the death of an unloved spinster. George has a good Indian inspired song "Love You To" complete with sitar and tabla. "Here, There and Everyone" is one of Paul's most beautiful love songs, some of his nicest singing and the most soothing backing vocals ever by John and George. Ringo gets a fun singalong novelty "Yellow Submarine" which was a #2 single here in the States. We finally get a song from John to end Side 1-"She Said She Said" is a strange, intriguing number with distorted guitars and lyrics about "I know what it's like to be dead". Side 2 opens with a joyous Paul song "Good Day Sunshine" some piano give it nice old fashioned ragtime feel. Another beautiful Paul song is the melancholy "For No One" more nice singing and  a delicate horn solo from guest musician Alan Civil. George's third song "I Want To Tell You" has some great guitar, I think this is the least one on the album due to some out of tune backing on the piano, but it is pretty good. "Got To Get You Into My Life" has Paul in R&B mode, backed by some great brass and sung with great gusto. John concludes the album with the startling and hypnotic "Tomorrow Never Knows". The sounds of seagulls and backwards guitar riffs give this an outer worldly feel. John's voice sounds like it is coming from some ancient temple. All four are starting to develop their own distinct personalities and not just a close knit group, but the music is still as great as ever.

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The Beatles, holding marching band instruments and wearing colourful uniforms, stand near a grave covered with flowers that spell "Beatles". Standing behind the band are several dozen famous people.

Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles-May 1967

A concept about a fictional band resulted in another of the group's greatest albums. The title track (sung mostly by Paul) sets the scene as the band is introduced and hope we will enjoy the show. At the end, we are told that the singer Billy Shears will sing a song next, it turns out this is Ringo (he is the only Pepper member to be given a name.) Then it dissolves into "With A Little Help From My Friends", the best song Lennon & McCartney wrote for Ringo, capturing his self deprecating wit and likability. Every song does not have a long band of silence between them it just goes right into the next one. "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" is next, an excellent psychedelic John song with great surreal imagery. Paul has the optimistic "Getting Better" next, it also has some dark lyrics about the narrator having been "cruel to my woman, I beat her and keep her apart from the things that she loved" but admits he is changing his scene. "Fixing A Hole" is another pleasant Paul song with some harpsichord at the beginning, lyrics are about filling the time so your mind does not wander. Paul has his third song in a row next. He is starting to be the dominant member of the group now, just like John was in the earlier years. "She's Leaving Home" was a timely song about the generation gap. Paul sings it very nicely over some harp and strings. The lyrics tell of a runaway girl who leaves her worried parents. John sings the part of the parents as they wonder what they did wrong.  John has an entertaining song about a circus "Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite". It has some appropriate organ music to go with it. George opens Side 2 with his Indian influenced "Within You, Without You" some of his best lyrics about living a life of illusion. Paul has a light hearted English music hall type song with "When I'm Sixty Four", a witty tune about aging. Paul is back again with a jaunty song "Lovely Rita" about falling in love with a meter maid. It gets a bit bawdy at the end with John doing some heavy breathing. "Good Morning Good Morning" is John singing about a married man trying to get through the day. It ends with a bunch of animal sound effects. The clucking chicken at the end turns into an electric guitar sound for next, a reprise of the title song, this time with some great guitar. The band thanks the audience and says it's time to go, but there is one more incredible number up their sleeve. The finale, "A Day In The Life" has John singing in an eerie voice about a man who "blew his mind out in a car".  There is the sound of an orchestra working it's way into a frenzy and then we hear an alarm clock and Paul takes over the vocals, as if the first part was just a dream. Paul then goes into a typical day of waking up, drinking some coffee and catching the bus to work. He falls asleep on the bus and the dreams start again with John's vocals.  He talks about filling the Albert Hall with holes and another round of the mad orchestra and the final chord is hammered down on piano. And here we have another pop music masterpiece. 

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"Café 1930" is the second movement of a four movement work entitled Histoire du Tango (1985) by Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla (1921-1992). Originally composed for guitar and flute, but often performed with other combinations, the work as a whole illustrates the history of the tango, with this movement representing the era when people first began to sit and listen to the tango performed as music, rather than as dance accompaniment. 
 
Guitar - Alexandra Whittingham
 
Violin - Esther Abrami
 
6' 46"
 
 
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On 1/22/2021 at 1:39 PM, Allhallowsday said:

y'mean this?  : The_Yes_Album.png

Yes indeed.  Did some research and see it was actually their 3rd album......this was the one that put them on the map......Steve Howe had joined the band!  Thanks.  Always loved this cover as well.

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3 hours ago, ladydid said:

Yes indeed.  Did some research and see it was actually their 3rd album......this was the one that put them on the map......Steve Howe had joined the band!  Thanks.  Always loved this cover as well.

I had it on vinyl.  Without doubt, the record that put YES on the map.  Personally, I never liked that album which includes :

 

 

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3 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

R-1846223-1518900114-9116.jpeg.jpg

Zep LP covers happen to be a pet topic of mine. LZII art was done by David Juniper, an art school buddy of Jimmy's. He based it on a WWI photo of Baron Von Richthofen and his crew. He threw in some additional faces, one often mistakenly said to be Glynnis Johns (wiki repeats this error) as a pun on recording engineer Glyn Johns, and disguised some of the original faces.

 

Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-2004-0430-501,_Jag

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16 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

I had it on vinyl.  Without doubt, the record that put YES on the map.  Personally, I never liked that album which includes :

 

 

Oh well......we all have our own tastes.    The band did have so many very talented musicians......Howe, Bruford, Wakeman, Squire, Anderson.  

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37 minutes ago, ladydid said:

Oh well......we all have our own tastes.    The band did have so many very talented musicians......Howe, Bruford, Wakeman, Squire, Anderson. 

Yes, all talented.  I saw them ALL get together "in the round" in a show at the Spectrum in Philadelphia around 1990.  Yes, two drummers, to keyboardists...! 

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