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On 4/16/2021 at 1:12 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Today at the jazz guitar website is yet debate about Ringo.    Someone said given his limited ability,  he was perfect for the Beatles since one can hear in his playing the emotional connection he had with his mates.

Someone else took that as a knock on Ringo.       I don't.        Ringo (or the vast majority of rock drummers),   does have less ability then a jazz drummer.    But for me he was a perfect fit for the Beatles and their music.      A drummer with more technical ability wouldn't have improved the music.   If anything it would lessen the overall impact and sound of the music.       A musician's "value" to a band isn't measured solely on technical ability or any other single attribute.       Ringo was the perfect fit for the Beatles and the sum-of-the-parts is what is important in any band (rock,  blues, jazz,,,, doesn't mater which genre).

    

Your post reminds me of something George Martin said in a Beatles doc, on the subject of Pete Best. He said he was stunned when he learned the Beatles had fired him, that (and I'm quoting from memory so may not be verbatim) "He was fine for performances. Nobody pays attention to the drummer. I just didn't want to record with him." 

PS - Posting that made me recall Quincy Jones's appraisal in his infamous - and hilarious - interview of a few years ago, relevant excerpt here. ("Great guy, though.")

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Ringo Starr - What's My Name.png

What's My Name by Ringo Starr-Oct 2019

Another OK CD. The first is a funky track "Gotta Get Up To Get Down" which has some vocal help from blues singer Edgar Winter. My favorite song is "Grow Old With Me" a touching version of a posthumously released song by John Lennon. Paul McCartney sings and plays bass on here and there is a nice string arrangement. "Magic" is an OK pop song. Ringo tries a new version of "Money" which is not as good as the Barrett Strong original or the great Beatles cover sung by John. It has a synthesizer instead of piano for the great opening riff. There is a pretty good pop song by Sam Hollander "Better Days". The last song is the title cut, written by Men At Work's Colin Hay, based on the chant Ringo does at his concerts encouraging the crowd to shout his name. This brings all of Ringo's full length albums up to date. He just released an EP of  songs which I have not bought or heard. I may get it but will not review it since I just like to do full length or vinyl LPs. I will definitely be watching for his next one.

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TravWilb1Cover.jpg

The Traveling Wilburys Vol 1- Oct 1988

An aptly called super group here-Ex Beatle George Harrison, Bob Dylan, one of the greatest songwriters of the century, Roy Orbison. one of the greatest voices in pop music history. Jeff Lynne leader of great 1970s band ELO and Tom Petty, one of the more talented of the late 1970s, early 1980s singer/songwriters. They pose as brothers with the last name of Wilbury with these names -Nelson (Harrison), Lucky (Dylan), Lefty (Orbison), Otis (Lynne) and Charlie T Jr (Petty). They all perform to their strengths on this excellent album. I have reviewed all of the Beatles and Harrison solo releases as well as all of Dylan's discography on this thread so I thought it was right to include this since it has some great stuff.

The first track is "Handle With Care", George starts off the lead vocal on this terrific and catchy tune and joined by the voices of the others for a magical combination. Dylan is next with "Dirty World" a very funny song filled with double entendres. it would have fit in nicely on Blonde On Blonde. Lynne does a good rockabilly song "Rattled". The others sing on this as well, though I don't hear Dylan on it. "Last Night" has Petty starting things off with some help from Roy. The next song is my favorite, it is an Orbison solo and sounds like it could have been a hit for him, it is as good as anything he ever did. George can be heard doing some beautiful backup vocals, this is absolute ear candy for both Orbison and Beatle fans.  Side 2 starts with "Congratulations"  a sarcastic break up song from Dylan. "Heading For The Light" is a great up tempo song for George, sounds like it could have been on his best album Cloud Nine. "Margarita" has Dylan starting it off, sounds a bit like an unfinished song, but still pretty good. "Tweeter And The Monkey Man" is a great Dylan story/song about a pair of drug dealers, an undercover cop and his shady sister Jan. It ends with a terrific rockabilly song "End Of The Line" with starts with George singing lead and then being helped by the others, though like "Rattled" I don't hear Dylan on this either.

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Traveling Wilburys Vol 3-Oct 1990

Super group reunion of George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Jeff Lynne and Tom Petty. Roy Orbison had passed away only 2 months after the release of Vol 1. This one is cheekily called Vol 3, (there was no Vol 2). It has some good stuff but not as great as the first. They all use different Wilbury names now- Spike (Harrison), Boo (Dylan), Clayton (Lynne) and Muddy (Petty).

"She's My Baby" has all four swapping lead vocals and great strumming guitars. "Inside Out" is mostly Petty helped by Dylan. Dylan gets a solo with "If You Belonged To Me". Petty and George mostly handle a protest song "The Devil's Been Busy" about pesticides and toxic  waste. "7 Deadly Sins" is a fun 1950s doo w o p type songs, Dylan again mostly in the lead. "Poor House" is good h o n k y tonk song by Lynne and Petty. Side 2 has a good Harrison/Dylan duet "Where Were You Last Night". "New Blue Moon" is another 1950s style song with nice harmonies by all. The final song "Wilbury Twist" is a funny send up of dance craze songs, everybody takes a turn at lead.

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2 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

ELLA FITZGERALD  The Harold Arlen Songbook, Vol. 1

 

Sinatra was asked in an interview, who were the top female vocalists?

HIs reply, "You mean besides Ella Fitzgerald?"

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Mötley Crüe (or as Larry King announced them, The Motley Crew!) goes biker chic and gets all fancy with time signature changes.

Whenever I deliver groceries and scripts to my Dad, this one comes to mind. Tonight it actually came on the radio, so I cranked it and draped my wrist over the top of the wheel and cruised slow while chewing nico gum and feeling, if not actually looking, bada$$.

I'm not a hair metal guy, really, but I like this one. 

 

 

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I've just learned of the death of Jim Steinman, Meat Loaf's songwriter, on Monday the 19th. He was 73. He is seen here in the spoken word intro, with Karla DeVito (Mrs. Robby Benson since 1982) and at the keys. Jim got his start in musical theater in the late 60s, and in that field later met Meat Loaf. Their theatricality is well-evident here. I saw this show live and it was so much more than the usual rock concerts I'd seen up to then. It was more like watching opera.

 

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3 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

I've just learned of the death of Jim Steinman,

My friend long ago so loved Bat Out Of Hell he bought JIM STEINMAN's first and only solo album Bad For Good.  Sad news. 

JSteinman_Bad.jpg

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