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Kinda Kinks by The Kinks (Album; Rhino; R2 70316): Reviews, Ratings,  Credits, Song list - Rate Your Music

Kinda Kinks-Aug 1965*

A pretty good album, they still haven't ironed out the rough spots yet, but some good stuff. The first song is "Look For Me Baby" a fairly catchy pop song. Dave sings the next two "Got My Feet On The Ground" and "Naggin' Woman" a blues song by Jimmy Anderson, Dave's voice has an annoying yelping quality on these. One of the best on the album is Ray's "Nothin In The World Can Stop Me Worrin' 'Bout That Girl", a good slow tempo song with an Ipanema type feel with nice bass and acoustic guitar. My favorite on here is the #6 hit "Tired Of Waiting For You", a good ballad and Ray does some of his best singing, with a pleading tone in his voice. Side 2 begins with a Motown remake "Dancing In The Street", not bad but cannot top Martha And The Vandellas.  The best of Dave's lead vocals is "Come On Now" a short but energetic rocker. "So Long" is another OK slow song. The last track is 'Something Better Beginning" a nice ballad in the style of the 1950s meeting on the dance floor type song. I like the sound they got on the opening guitar part.

*Once again I am reviewing the 1988 Rhino Records release, which is the one I own.

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The Kinks – Kinkdom (1988, Vinyl) - Discogs

Kinkdom by The Kinks- Dec 1965*

The best Kinks album so far, it has many of their finest songs of this period. The opener is "A Well Respected Man" a top twenty song with some of Ray's greatest lyrics. It is a pointed jab at the well to do English who may not be as happy as they seem. Dave wrote his first song here "Wait Till The Summer Comes Along"  which is pretty good, like the guitar picking. "Such A Shame" has a good melody and jangling rhythm guitar. "See My Friends" is hypnotic early psychedelia, long before it became popular. "Sitting On My Sofa" is a blues riff with spare lyrics. Side 2 opens with the hilarious "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" a satiric look at a foppish Londoner who follows all the latest fashion trends, sung in Ray's thickest English accent. "Who'll Be The Next In Line" is quick little rocker. "I Need You" is another of their early driving rockers with another great guitar solo.  "It's All Right" is a fun rave up with some wild harmonica playing. The closer "I'm Not Like Everybody Else" has more great lyrics about a rebel who does not want to conform to society. Ray wrote it but Dave sings it, he does a good job, sung in a sneering, defiant tone.

* I am reviewing the 1988 Rhino Records reissue, which is good since the track list is much better than the original

 

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44 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Kinks – Kinkdom (1988, Vinyl) - Discogs

Kinkdom by The Kinks- Dec 1965*

The best Kinks album so far, it has many of their finest songs of this period. The opener is "A Well Respected Man" a top twenty song with some of Ray's greatest lyrics. It is a pointed jab at the well to do English who may not be as happy as they seem. Dave wrote his first song here "Wait Till The Summer Comes Along"  which is pretty good, like the guitar picking. "Such A Shame" has a good melody and jangling rhythm guitar. "See My Friends" is hypnotic early psychedelia, long before it became popular. "Sitting On My Sofa" is a blues riff with spare lyrics. Side 2 opens with the hilarious "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" a satiric look at a foppish Londoner who follows all the latest fashion trends, sung in Ray's thickest English accent. "Who'll Be The Next In Line" is quick little rocker. "I Need You" is another of their early driving rockers with another great guitar solo.  "It's All Right" is a fun rave up with some wild harmonica playing. The closer "I'm Not Like Everybody Else" has more great lyrics about a rebel who does not want to conform to society. Ray wrote it but Dave sings it, he does a good job, sung in a sneering, defiant tone.

* I am reviewing the 1988 Rhino Records reissue, which is good since the track list is much better than the original

 

Ray Davies really starts to show his lyrical chops and what would be one of his trade marks;  this take on stuffy English society and biting jabs, with just the right amount of humor and satire,  in songs like A Well Respected Man,  Dedicated Follower of Fashion, I'm Not Like Everybody Else and Who'll Be  The Next In Line.

 

  

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53 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Ray Davies really starts to show his lyrical chops and what would be one of his trade marks;

One of the greatest lyricist of his generation, I think right up there with Lennon & McCartney and Dylan. His melodies are often great too.

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1965 - The Kink Kontroversy - front.jpg

The Kink Kontroversy by The Kinks-Apr 1966

A good album, showing a few signs of things to come. The first track is the old blues song "Milk Cow Blues" which was also done by Elvis Presley, it is the last cover song the Kinks would release. "Ring The Bells" is a sweet love song with a nice melody. "Gotta Get The First Plane Home" is a good rocker with a nice guitar riff and Ray's harmonica playing. Dave gets a solo song "I Am Free" with some laid back vocals from him. "Till The End Of The Day" is another of their raucous singles they were first noted for, it only went to #50 in the US, but still a good song. Side 2 has an introspective song from Ray "The World Keeps Going Round". "I'm On An Island" is one of their humorous songs, Ray is funny goofing around with his singing. My favorite on this album is "Where Have All The Good Times Gone" Ray once again showing his old soul personality in the lyrics, Ray and Dave harmonize on the chorus.  "You Can't Win" is an OK bluesy number which ends the record.

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Face to Face (The Kinks album) coverart.jpg

Face To Face by The Kinks-Dec 1966

The group had all their creative juices flowing now and created this pop masterwork. "Party Line" is a rollicking tune about the long ago world of telephone party lines, Dave sings lead. "Rosy Won't You Please Come Home" is a bittersweet tale of a girl who reached the upper classes and now ignores her working class family. "Dandy" is jaunty music hall number about a womanizer who will remain a bachelor the rest of his life. "Too Much On My Mind" is a slower, more serious song about depression, one of the lines is "my poor demented mind is slowly going".  "Session Man" is a great tribute to session musicians. Some great thunder and rain sounds on "Rainy Day In June" , it also has some eerie images of demons, elves and gnomes. "House In The Country" is another Ray Davies dig at the English class system in this tale of a smug rich kid who inherited his father's money and cares only for his nice house and expensive sports car. Side 2 has some more hilarious satire on commercialization, in this one an Englishman wins a trip to Hawaii but finds nothing truly "Hawaiian" when he gets there. Another rich guy loses everything in "Most Exclusive Residence For Sale" and ends up drunk and penniless. "Fancy" is a hypnotic raga sounding song, one of the lyrics is "No one can penetrate me". "Little Miss Queen Of Darkness" is girl who happily dances at the discotheque  but is really sad inside ."You're Looking Fine" is love song sung by Dave in a yelping voice. 'Sunny Afternoon" is another English guy done in by the tax man, it was a great vaudevillian style tune and became a top 20 hit. This often cynical, witty album ends with a sweet love song "I'll Remember".

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SomethingElseKinksCover.jpg

Something Else By The Kinks -Jan 1968

I wouldn't have thought the Kinks could have topped Face To Face, but they did, second masterpiece in a row. "David Watts" starts things off with some great piano (probably Nicky Hopkins, who is credited on the album), a tale of the guy you know from school who was the smartest, strongest and all around golden boy. The narrator of the song wishes he could be like him. My favorite track maybe Dave's composition (with a little help from brother Ray) "Death Of A Clown", it's an intriguing story of the sad life of circuses, there is a hauntingly beautiful falsetto bridge sung by Ray's wife Rasa. "Two Sisters" is a great song about sibling jealousy, one sister is a party girl and the other a housewife and mother. Rock groups don't normally show sympathy to drab housewives, but the Kinks were not a typical rock group and here Pricilla the housewife is a heroine. "No Return" has a nice gentle bossa nova beat. "Harry Rag" is a great raucous pub singalong song, seems to be about cigarettes. "Tin Soldier Man" is a fun song that sounds like it came from an operetta, nice horn arrangement. We are back to average English life with "Situation Vacant" a witty and ironic song about  Johnny a man just married to Suzy, but they live with her mother. The mother in law has too much ambition and goads Johnny into leaving his steady job. Side 2 begins with "Love Me Till The Sun Shines" another good song written solo by Dave. "Lazy Old Sun" has some more South American flavor in the music, Ray sings in a funny, lazy voice. Ray is able make the English tradition of "Afternoon Tea" into a great song. Dave has another song "Funny Face" which has some of his most intriguing lyrics-"I see you peering through frosted windows, eyes don't smile, all they do is cry". "End Of The Season" is a vaudevillian tune with suitably campy singing from Ray. It ends with the Kink classic "Waterloo Sunset",  a beautiful song where the narrator doesn't need any friends, he just watches the world from his window and the sunset feels like paradise. 

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On 7/12/2020 at 12:46 PM, Det Jim McLeod said:

TheKinksVillageGreenPreservationSociety.jpg

The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society Jan 1969

I just saw a PBS documentary on the making of this classic album so I pulled it out and gave it a listen for the first time in years. It definitely is one of the group's best records. Ray Davies' song writing was excellent as always and the band's playing is impeccable. The album was not a success in it's day but has gained acclaim in later years. The songs are nostalgic for simpler times but still have the Davies wit to them. It begins with the title song, as they sing about "preserving the old ways" and "God save little shops, china cups and virginity", hardly the stuff most rock bands were doing at this turbulent time. "Do You Remember Walter" is a witty song about an old school friend who probably now is "fat and married". "Picture Book" is a wonderful, catchy song about looking at old photographs, the last song "People Take Pictures Of Each Other" is a similar theme where the pictures are taken to "prove they really existed. "Village Green" is another nostalgic, wistful song about simple small town living. There are also two songs which tackle the supernatural. "Phenomenal Cat" is a  fairy tale about a cat who lives just to eat, there is an impish voice on the chorus. "Wicked Annabella" is a spooky tale of a witch with enslaved little demons. The songs are very English but although I am American, I have English heritage and was always fascinated by the culture. Listening to the album makes you wish for simpler times as well, even if you are not English.

I bumped up my review for this Kinks album, so I have all their records in order.

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8 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society Jan 1969

One of a small number of perfect record albums, in any genre, and one of the best. 

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The front cover artwork of the album. A white coffee mug with the word "Arthur" and a picture of two men sits in the foreground; a sepia-tone profile photo of the Kinks sits behind it; a swan and other small, various objects sit behind the photo. A hand raises a flag from behind the pileup, which reads "The Kinks". These objects sit on a green background, with the exception of the top border, which is covered by storm clouds.

Arthur (Or The Decline And Fall Of British Empire) by The Kinks-Nov 1969

Another very good album, though not as great as the last three. They have a new bassist John Dalton, after Pete Quaife left the band. Still some excellent songs, it is sometimes hard to pick up on the words as Ray sometimes rushes through them and the production overpowers them. The album was Ray writing a soundtrack to a British TV special about a working class man facing where his life has gone. The opener "Victoria" is a great song about a man thinking about his early life with Victoria as the only Queen he knew back then. A rousing chorus on this one. "Yes Sir No Sir" is a witty song about army life, starting with military drumming by Mick Avory, lyrics like "permission to breathe, sir". "Some Mother's Son is a poignant song about a soldier dying in war and the affect on his loved ones. "Drivin" is funny upbeat tune about taking the family for a drive to escape reality. "Brainwashed" has some good horn arrangements in this tale about losing your identity when working a job every day. 'Australia" is about finding something in another country, the song is OK but goes on too long (6:40). Side 2 begins with my favorite on the album "Shangri La" a multi part song about having a nice house, a car and sitting by the fire at night. It begins with a beautiful haunting melody with acoustic guitar, harpsichord enters in the middle and ends up a bopping rocker. "Mr Churchill Says' shows some nostalgia for the WWII era. "She Bought A Hat Like Princess Marina" is a very funny vaudevillian tune. "Nothing To Say" shows how grown children drift away from their parents when they have children of their own. The title song once again has the title character wondering about his life.

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