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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

ok,  right, I won't argue with that.   Maybe we could agree it was a collaborative effort.    (But Gram Parsons was better looking.  😐 )

Oh no, I totally disagree.  CHRIS HILLMAN was always handsome even with his manfro 50 years ago... 'course he was younger than any of his bandmates...  I do think GRAM PARSONS was an enormous talent - I have his two albums and also the first two ("real") FLYING BURRITO BROTHERS albums which I both love (they "didn't sell" either - very poor sales). 

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Maybe we could agree it was a collaborative effort. 

I'd guess the only BYRDS album GRAM PARSONS was on is Sweetheart Of The Rodeo.  I know his tenure with BYRDS was brief.  I owned one or two BYRDS collections on vinyl eventually, but the only album of theirs proper I bought (and sometimes still listen to) is Sweetheart Of The Rodeo. Ah! Yes!  Yet another poor seller!  "NOBODY BOUGHT IT!" :)

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"Oh no, I totally disagree.  CHRIS HILLMAN was always handsome even with his manfro 50 years ago"

Hmmm...question of taste, I guess  (which applies at least as much to looks as to music.)

You posted about Dave Brubeck a little while back.  I think an under-rated album by him is "Jazz Impressions of New York".  Especially this track, which to me is wonderfully melancholy and moody, especially with that bluesy piano bit  at around  4:20 or so  .

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

"Celluloid Heroes" a beautiful, poignant tribute to classic film stars

Aside from Village Green songs, there aren't many KINKS songs I love and that's one of them.  Wonderful.

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8 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Especially this track, which to me is wonderfully melancholy and moody, especially with that bluesy piano bit  at around  4:20 or so  .

That recording is included in that DAVE BRUBECK collection I was listening to... and I would not have looked if you hadn't pointed it out.  Thanks!   Bluesy Jazzy melancholic mid-century urban... right up my alley.

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56 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Kinksshowbiz.jpg

Everybody's In Show Biz by The Kinks-Aug 1972

A double album, one studio tracks, the other a live disc. The studio one is very entertaining, the live one not so much, seems unnecessary to include it, really brings down the quality of the whole package.

Disc 1

It starts with "Here Come Yet Another Day" a fast paced and funny song about a rock star's life on the road. "Maximum Consumption" continues the life of a performer, he is obsessed with food. "Unreal Reality" is just OK, about illusions. "Hot Potatoes" is another funny and catchy song about food. Ray slips into his working class bloke persona for this one, as his baby nags him about getting a job and if he doesn't all he will get for dinner is potatoes. "Sitting In My Hotel" is pretty good, more about life on the road and stuck in hotels. Side 2 opens with "Motorway" about a job which forces the narrator to ride down the motorway and eat a lot of bad food. Dave's only contribution is "You Don't Know My Name", not one of his best. "Supersonic Rocket Ship" is a fun song about wanting to fly away from earth. It has a good reggae beat and I like the guitar sound on it. "Look A Little On The Sunny Side" is another funny comical song with a  Dixieland feel with the horns. Ray is having a good time goofing around on this one. The last and best song (and one of the group's best ever) is "Celluloid Heroes" a beautiful, poignant tribute to classic film stars. It's about the stars on Hollywood boulevard, some that you recognize (he mentions Greta Garbo, Rudolph Valentino, Bela Lugosi, Bette Davis, George Sanders, Mickey Rooney and "dearest Marilyn") and some you hardly heard of.

Disc 2

The live set does not have any of the classic Kinks hits. It is mostly just songs that were on Muswell Hillbillies, their most recent record. There a  couple of snippets of Ray camping it up on old songs like "Mr Wonderful",  "Banana Boat Song" and "Baby Face". The last track is 1:40 of Ray leading the audience in the chorus of their hit "Lola". So it is not really worth it, but Disc 1 is definitely worth listening to.

I couldn't agree with you with you more about the live disc part of this album.  Full disclosure, I rarely like "live" albums, even when by my favourite artists  (the one exception maybe being "The Who Live at Leeds".)  But the Kinks in particular don't work for me as a live band.  I have seen them live twice  (ages ago...yes,  I'm old   -ish !)  both times at Massey Hall in Toronto.   Ray just hams it up too much, he's more interested in goofing around and trying to get the audience to sing along, not to mention mocking his brother Dave, than he is in seriously performing his music.  ( Hey, if I'd wanted to sing " Dedicated Follower of Fashion" myself, I'd have stayed at home, saved the fifty bucks  (or however much it was at the t ime), and played the record. )  

But the first disc is pretty good.  Most of the tracks are ok, as you mention.  And again as you mention,  the two stand-outs are "Sitting in My Hotel Room"  -  so meditative and lonely-  and of course,  "Celluloid Heroes".    I have to assume that anyone who comes to this website  (the Turner Classic Movies forum)  has to love this song.  We know all the "stars" Ray mentions !  The song is , as you put it so well,   " a beautiful, poignant tribute to classic film stars".    I'd put "Celluloid Heroes" up there in the top 20 Ray Davies compositions, which is really saying something, since I think this guy was a great song-writer.

 

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

I'd put "Celluloid Heroes" up there in the top 20 Ray Davies compositions, which is really saying something, since I think this guy was a great song-writer.

ALEX TREBEK:  Good!

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1 minute ago, Allhallowsday said:

ALEX TREBEK:  Good!

 ??   Maybe Mr.  Trebek  had a nice way of saying "Good" when he approved of something??  I'm embarrassed to admit,  I never really watched Jeopardy..  "That said",  I understand Alex was an exceptionally decent and intelligent man, and I'm proud he was Canadian.   (but of course most Americans probably don't know that.)

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6 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 ??   Maybe Mr.  Trebek  had a nice way of saying "Good" when he approved of something??  I'm embarrassed to admit,  I never really watched Jeopardy..  "That said",  I understand Alex was an exceptionally decent and intelligent man, and I'm proud he was Canadian.   (but of course most Americans probably don't know that.)

We know!  ALEX was proud of his Canadian heritage and made sure his viewers knew it!  And yes!  It was wonderful to have ALEX approve or confirm your correct response.   "Celluloid Heroes" is one of RAY DAVIES best. 

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8 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I have seen them live twice  (ages ago...yes,  I'm old   -ish !)  both times at Massey Hall in Toronto.   Ray just hams it up too much, he's more interested in goofing around and trying to get the audience to sing along, not to mention mocking his brother Dave, than he is in seriously performing his music.

I never saw the Kinks live but did see Ray Davies solo when he did a show in a small theater in Greenwich Village NYC. This was in 1996 when he was promoting his book X Ray, he would read stories from it and he performed nearly all the famous Kinks songs, it was a great show.

And about his relationship with brother Dave, in 2013 I was at book signing for Ray's next book Americana. There was a radio host interviewing him, he was asked how Dave was. His first reply was "Dave who?" with his cheeky grin. He then said he was doing alright and he writes some great music. The audience applauded but when it died down, he couldn't resist adding "But he's a punk!"

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11 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

And about his relationship with brother Dave, in 2013 I was at book signing for Ray's next book Americana. There was a radio host interviewing him, he was asked how Dave was. His first reply was "Dave who?" with his cheeky grin. He then said he was doing alright and he writes some great music. The audience applauded but when it died down, he couldn't resist adding "But he's a punk!"

I had read one of the biggest problems with THE KINKS touring was the brothers fighting all the time. 

Speaking of "nobody listening" to :

 

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KinksPreservation1.jpg

Preservation Act 1 by The Kinks -Nov 1973

The Kinks try musical theater on record. The first track "Morning Song" sounds like it could be from a musical, no singing but there is a lot of humming. "Daylight" sets the scene with some Village Green types going about their daily lives. "Sweet Lady Genevieve" is nice one about a lost love, sung by Ray as a character simply called The Tramp. "There's A Change In The Weather" has three characters-Working Class Man, Middle Class Man and Upper Class Man, all sung by Ray, they seem to be all worried about some impending trouble brewing. The Tramp sings "Where Are They Now?" about English types that now longer seem to exist, like Teddy Boys, Mods and Rockers. "One Of The Survivors" is about Johnny Thunder, one of the last of the motorcycle riding types who digs Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly and Dion And The Belmonts.  Side 2 begins with "Cricket" a song sung by The Vicar, he equates the game of cricket with Godliness. "Money And Corruption/I Am Your Man" finally seems to get the story going as the people are fed up with being ignored and empty promises. A new character Mr Black, tells them he will be their savior and will unite all the workers. "Here Comes Flash" has the ominous sound of the villainous Flash who is coming to do you in. The best song is "Sitting In The Midday Sun" sung by The Tramp who is perfectly happy to do nothing all day but sit in the sun. The last song "Demolition" is Flash and his cronies taking over and demolishing everything in their path. So this is not one of the group's best, it is just an introduction to a few characters and a story that so far is not too involving.

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Bob Dylan is 80 today. Here is an old favorite from I think 1975. He once said Blood On The Tracks was an entire album based on Chekhov stories. I love Bob, but I know you can't always take him at his word. I'm not even sure there was a motorcycle accident. 

But I do love this one. 

 

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KinksPreservation2.jpg

Preservation Act 2 by The Kinks -May 1974

Ray Davies continues his musical piece and really goes theatrical on this one. It is at time uneven, but a few good songs here and the production is good.

Side 1

An radio announcer tells us that Mr Black and his People's Army are trying to overthrow the corrupt regime of Flash. "Introduction To The Solution" is sung by The Tramp who tells of Mr Black carefully plotting his next move while Flash and his men drink champagne. "When A Solution Comes" is Mr Black wanting to change the world. Flash and his Floosies and Spivs sing about how "Money Talks". "Shepherds Of The Nation" is one of the better songs, an ironic and funny one where Mr Black and his Do Gooders tell about how they are down on pornography, sex, sin, depravity and homosexuality. The want to keep their new nation "clean".

Side 2

 Flash then sings about how people call him "Scum Of The Earth" but he is just human like you. "Second Hand Car Spiv" is about a slum kid who left school, went on Welfare and now is smartly dressed criminal for Flash. "He's Evil" is Mr Black telling about the evilness of Flash to the crowds. "Mirror Of Love" introduces a new character, Belle, who is Flash's special floosie. Ray sings this character as well, he does nearly all of them. An announcement tells us Mr Black and his army and Flash and his men are doing battle.

Side 3

"Nobody Gives" is the Tramp reminding us of other corrupt regimes who have failed in history. The Tramp and the Do Gooders sing "Oh Where Oh Where is Love" as they lament about the war and hatefulness all around. "Flash's Dream" is spoken word track, as Flash is visiting by his soul  and reminds him of his evil deeds. "Flash's Confession" has him realizing what he has done and now he will have to answer for it.

Side 4

"Nothing Lasts Forever" is one of the best on this album. A plaintive ballad by Belle (now sung by a female singer) and Flash, it has a beautiful melody.  The Peoples' Army is victorious and Flash is taken prisoner. "Artificial Man" shows Mr Black is no better than Flash as he and a Mad Scientist now want to build a world of artificial people totally programmed with pre conditioned thoughts and emotions. The female singer Belle is back with "Scrapheap City" as she describes Flash's empire being dismantled. The best song is the last "Salvation Road" a rousing marching song.

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One more in honor of Dylan's 80th. Joan Baez insisted for years this was written about her husband, and not Bob. I don't know who she thought she was kidding, but it is a lovely work.

 

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Preservation Act 2 by The Kinks -May 1974

According to Wiki,  Act 2 charted higher (Billboard 114)  than Act 1  (Billboard 177).   Neither is an impressive show. 

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The Kinks - Soap Opera.jpg

Soap Opera by The Kinks-May 1975

Another concept album by the Kinks, and this is a good one, I liked it much better than Preservation. It begins with "Everybody's A Star" in which the main character Starmaker, is a rock star who wants to prove he can make anybody a star. He switches places with ordinary man Norman and lives with the man's wife and works at his dull job. "Ordinary People' is the kind of song Ray does best, about the plight of the ordinary  British working man. "Rush Hour Blues" is a good song done in blues style about waking up, having tea, catching the train to work. "Nine To Five" shows how the Star is finding out how dull life is working at this ordinary office job. The next two songs "When Work Is Over" and "Have Another Drink" captures the feeling of unwinding after work at the bar with a few drinks. "Underneath The Neon Sign" has some great guitar playing, sort of a sad country tune. My favorite song on here is "Holiday Romance" about taking a holiday at a seaside hotel and he has an affair. It has a vaudevillian feel and nice string arrangement. "You Make It All Worth While"  has Star and the wife Andrea (played by June Ritchie) arguing over dinner and we know find out that Star was actually Norman all along, it was just his fantasy about being a rock star, I thought this was a good twist to the story.  'Ducks On The Wall" is a hilarious song about Norman/Star hating on the terrible taste décor in his house, a bunch of ducks on the wall. Norman realizes he must now face reality again in "Face In The Crowd". The final song "You Can't Stop The Music" is a tribute to all rock stars.

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