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45 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Sometime you must tell me about some of the other foreign TV shows that you follow or have followed.

Aside from mysteries, two of my favorite shows are French shows called " The Village " - - which is about the French Resistance and  "Spiral" ,  which is a "Law & Order" type show, with equal emphasis on  the judicial & police sides, based in Paris.

Interesting. I've never watched any French TV. How do you get French TV? Are these programs that air on PBS?

When I had Hulu there was an Australian drama I watched sometimes.

The main British shows I watch on Britbox are mysteries (Vera, Inspector Morse, Midsomer Murders, Shetland which is a show made in Scotland, Sherlock Holmes with Jeremy Britt, etc.). And I watch daily episodes of my favorite British soaps (Emmerdale and EastEnders; I've given up on Coronation Street until the current producer leaves since she's really ruined it in two short years). There are some good classic comedy shows on Britbox, as well as specials about the royal family, and shows about gardening and wildlife. Basically a bit of everything!

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The French TV shows along with the Scandinavian and Italian Mysteries are free on my local PBS station. They have a number of digital stations and one carries carries MHz worldview.

Now you can pay for it, MHz choice if you want to, but, of course what I'm looking at is free. And of course it's all subtitled.

They have other digital stations where they show the usual BBC Masterpiece Theater stuff-- and what they choose to show locally on these are all in English and that would be Midsomer Murders, Keeping Up Appearances,  Doc Martin and As Time Goes By.

I had to buy the Vicar of Dibley because they've never shown it except on specials-- that's how I knew about it.

Have you looked into this Acorn streaming-- I bought DVDs from them and they're always trying to sell it to me.

BTW-- I've watched French movies on Hulu and on YouTube.

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12 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

The French TV shows along with the Scandinavian and Italian Mysteries are free on my local PBS station. They have a number of digital stations and one carries carries MHz worldview.

Now you can pay for it, MHz choice if you want to, but, of course what I'm looking at is free. And of course it's all subtitled.

They have other digital stations where they show the usual BBC Masterpiece Theater stuff-- and what they choose to show locally on these are all in English and that would be Midsomer Murders, Keeping Up Appearances,  Doc Martin and As Time Goes By.

I had to buy the Vicar of Dibley because they've never shown it except on specials-- that's how I knew about it.

Have you looked into this Acorn streaming-- I bought DVDs from them and they're always trying to sell it to me.

BTW-- I've watched French movies on Hulu and on YouTube.

I did check Acorn out but thought it was pricey. And Britbox really has everything I want. 

I love how much British culture is reflected on Britbox. Like when there's a holiday, we see things like the boys' chorus singing Christmas carols at Kings college, or singing religious hymns at the college to commemorate Easter. 

On St. Patrick's Day Britbox added some rare Irish comedies. Things that hadn't been shown since the 80s and 90s. So you get a sense of culture and how things have evolved in Britain by seeing these older and newer productions side by side.

During the weeks leading up to the Oscar telecast, they dug in their archives and posted a TV miniseries Daniel Day Lewish had made for the BBC in 1985. All because he was up for an Oscar and they were honoring him. It's really a great streaming site.

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27 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I did check Acorn out but thought it was pricey. And Britbox really has everything I want. 

I love how much British culture is reflected on Britbox. Like when there's a holiday, we see things like the boys' chorus singing Christmas Carols at Kings college, or singing religious hymns at the college to commemorate Easter. 

On St. Patrick's Day Britbox added some rare Irish comedies. Things that hadn't been since since the 80s and 90s. So you get a sense of culture and how things have evolved in Britain by seeing these older and newer shows side by side.

During the weeks leading up to the Oscar telecast, the dug in their archives and posted a TV miniseries Daniel Day Lewish had made for the BBC in 1985. All because he was up for an Oscar and they were honoring him. It's really a great streaming site.

I have a degree in French so I'm a French speaker and went to school and worked there.  I adapted to and I adopted French culture as my second culture since I was in high school

But how I got into britcoms, it's kind of funny. I was doing one of those 3 months stays in France and I was about to overstay my Visa. So I just went over to England for a brief sejour And I ended up staying 6 months.

I fell in love with this big TV sitcom  over there,  "Only When I Laugh". Before that I thought all their comedy  was like Benny Hill and I certainly didn't care for him.

By living there I came to understand a little bit better their Lifestyles and way of looking at things. I never would think that their culture in general was on the same level as French culture, but on the other hand it has more similarities to American culture which can also put you at ease.

The English are very helpful and have a lot of admiration for Americans.

 

BTW--The star of "Only When I Laugh " was veteran actor James Bolam, who was also one of the original stars of "New Tricks".

 

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I am looking at Midsomer Murders on Britbox. I love how they have organized the episodes:

Cast Favorites, which we have been discussing.
Method -- includes bludgeoned; stabbed, drowned; poisoned; shot; strangled/suffocated
Location (with map) -- includes Badger's Drift; Midsomer Worthy; Midsomer Magna; Midsomer Parva; Midsomer Mallow; Morton Fendle; Aspern Tallow; Fletcher's Cross; Midsomer Malham; Midsomer Deverell; Martyr Warren
Killer Cameos
Family Feuds
New to Midsomer (I guess these are episodes where new people show up and get involved in murder.)
Plus episodes are arranged by teams -- Barnaby & Troy; Barnaby & Scott; T. Barnaby & Jones; J. Barnaby & Jones; Barnaby & Nelson; Barnaby & Winter.

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Finally watched SWING TIME, since Unspooled is doing a podcast on it this week and I'm doing the TCM course this month. Wow, for a big chunk of the movie it's on one--the scene to scene plot progression and presentation feels like it's way out there for awhile and kind of on pluto until things start to wrap up after the blackface number.

I'm not familiar with many older musicals or Fred Astaire. What a weird movie star that guy seems like. He's got such a goofy look to be a romantic lead but it works for the broad tone and comedy. There's lots of clever callbacks with words and things set up earlier showing up later at key points (e.g. the palmed ace). Stevens did a great job blocking a number of the dialogue scenes, so that there's some visual storytelling going on. 

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The 1962 production of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA on Starz. Didn't think I'd like it since I'm such a fan of Claude Rains in the 1943 version. But this one's quite good, in different ways. Herbert Lom does a fantastic job with the death scene at the end. The Hammer studio style means it has a unique energy that we don't find in Hollywood films.

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watching 42nd Street on tcm..for the eleven millionth time...I don't know why I always feel compelled to watch this over and over...always wonder if Ginger Rogers doesn't watch Ruby Keeler dancing and think 'how'd she get the lead?'...Oh dear, Gold Diggers of 1933 is on after this...I often feel compelled to watch that too...maybe my house is haunted by Busby Berkeley...

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On 6/4/2018 at 8:32 PM, TopBilled said:

I am looking at Midsomer Murders on Britbox. I love how they have organized the episodes:

Cast Favorites, which we have been discussing.
Method -- includes bludgeoned; stabbed, drowned; poisoned; shot; strangled/suffocated
Location (with map) -- includes Badger's Drift; Midsomer Worthy; Midsomer Magna; Midsomer Parva; Midsomer Mallow; Morton Fendle; Aspern Tallow; Fletcher's Cross; Midsomer Malham; Midsomer Deverell; Martyr Warren
Killer Cameos
Family Feuds
New to Midsomer (I guess these are episodes where new people show up and get involved in murder.)
Plus episodes are arranged by teams -- Barnaby & Troy; Barnaby & Scott; T. Barnaby & Jones; J. Barnaby & Jones; Barnaby & Nelson; Barnaby & Winter.

 

Monday night I watched "Blood Wedding" for about the third time. It's really quite an excellent episode and near the end of John Nettles' run.  The guest star was Charles Edwards, who played Edith's unfortunate love interest in "Downton Abbey".

 PBS shows them in chronological order.

Top Billed-- Do you have a favorite Detective Sergeant for Barnaby?

Most fans on the website go for Troy because he's modelled after the original character in the novels. But they had to tone that character down a bit because he was quite, blunt and bigoted in some of his opinions. So the character on TV is just a bit tacky, but all together lovable. ( Daniel Casey)

The second actor who played the Detective Sergeant did not catch on with the public and was disliked by John Nettles.  Although some of their episodes together were quite excellent. ( John Hopkins)

I think the actor who played Jones suited Nettles the best because he was more subservient and willing to learn.  And there was never any chance of him upstaging Nettles. LOL ( Jason Hughes)

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5 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Monday night I watched "Blood Wedding" for about the third time. It's really quite an excellent episode and near the end of John Nettles' run.  The guest star was Charles Edwards, who played Edith's unfortunate love interest in "Downton Abbey".

 PBS shows them in chronological order.

Top Billed-- Do you have a favorite Detective Sergeant for Barnaby?

Most fans on the website go for Troy because he's modelled after the original character in the novels. But they had to tone that character down a bit because he was quite, blunt and bigoted in some of his opinions. So the character on TV is just a bit tacky, but all together lovable. ( Daniel Casey)

The second actor who played the Detective Sergeant did not catch on with the public and was disliked by John Nettles.  Although some of their episodes together were quite excellent. ( John Hopkins)

I think the actor who played Jones suited Nettles the best because he was more subservient and willing to learn.  And there was never any chance of him upstaging Nettles. LOL ( Jason Hughes)

Jones is my favorite. I like how he bridges the two eras. Jason Hughes returns in a season 19 episode ("Last Man Out") and at that point he's D.I. Jones and working undercover.

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Jones is my favorite. I like how he bridges the two eras. Jason Hughes returns in a season 19 episode ("Last Man Out") and at that point he's D.I. Jones and working undercover.

Somewhere online I read an article, interview with Jason Hughes. He said he quit because he was quite put out that he had a long commute to the location and he wasn't paid enough money to live near the location.

Since he had appeared in so many episodes-- I think it was five seasons--I couldn't figure out why there was such a problem like that.

 

I like Troy the best. His ability to carry the plot without the star reminds me a lot of Inspector Lewis when he was a detective sergeant. Daniel Casey has enough charisma and rapport with the audience to have his own TV series as a DCI. He also was a versatile actor with a comedic bent that the other two really didn't handle as well. I should say Jason had somewhat of a comedic bent, but John Hopkins was rather stiff.

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16 hours ago, shutoo said:

watching 42nd Street on tcm..for the eleven millionth time...I don't know why I always feel compelled to watch this over and over...always wonder if Ginger Rogers doesn't watch Ruby Keeler dancing and think 'how'd she get the lead?'...Oh dear, Gold Diggers of 1933 is on after this...I often feel compelled to watch that too...maybe my house is haunted by Busby Berkeley...

I love Gold Diggers of 1933.  I'm not normally a Busby Berkeley fan.  I find his famed kaleidoscope dance numbers monotonous at times.  Gold Diggers of 1933 cracks me up--especially "Pettin' in the Park."  That number is just so bizarre.  From the song, to Billy Barty as a Baby, to Baby Billy Barty on roller skates, to the chastity belts, it is amazing.

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23 hours ago, BrianBlake said:

Finally watched SWING TIME, since Unspooled is doing a podcast on it this week and I'm doing the TCM course this month. Wow, for a big chunk of the movie it's on one--the scene to scene plot progression and presentation feels like it's way out there for awhile and kind of on pluto until things start to wrap up after the blackface number.

I'm not familiar with many older musicals or Fred Astaire. What a weird movie star that guy seems like. He's got such a goofy look to be a romantic lead but it works for the broad tone and comedy. There's lots of clever callbacks with words and things set up earlier showing up later at key points (e.g. the palmed ace). Stevens did a great job blocking a number of the dialogue scenes, so that there's some visual storytelling going on. 

I think Fred Astaire is not the typical movie star.  He's very thin, he'd balding, he's definitely no Errol Flynn.  However, I think that he was popular because he is so likeable.  His dancing is elegant and he's so classy.  If he wasn't such a great dancer, I don't know that he would have become the star he became.

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I just watched yesterday's special two-part episode of Emmerdale. It really brought a lot of tears to my eyes. Such a sad but uplifting story. This is by far Emma Atkins' best work and she's been on the show since 2000, always doing a great job. It helps that they cast a guy who really has cerebral palsy to play her secret son.

Screen Shot 2018-06-06 at 4.38.26 PM.jpg

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6 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I think Fred Astaire is not the typical movie star.  He's very thin, he'd balding, he's definitely no Errol Flynn.  However, I think that he was popular because he is so likeable.  His dancing is elegant and he's so classy.  If he wasn't such a great dancer, I don't know that he would have become the star he became.

That's part of it. He does have a class and grace, but at least in SWING TIME, you can tell he's got a bit carny/vaudeville in there. He is elegant and smooth, but it's a bit performative somehow. Victor Moore being in the movie also I think is meant to make him seem even more elegant--he's crass and likely to intentionally cheat people, but even just looking at appearance and style: Moore is balding even more, he's more rotund, he's not as tall, he stumbles around more, and he slurs his speech far more.

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I think Fred Astaire is not the typical movie star.  He's very thin, he'd balding, he's definitely no Errol Flynn.  However, I think that he was popular because he is so likeable.  His dancing is elegant and he's so classy.  If he wasn't such a great dancer, I don't know that he would have become the star he became.

 

 

On 6/5/2018 at 2:41 PM, BrianBlake said:

Finally watched SWING TIME, since Unspooled is doing a podcast on it this week and I'm doing the TCM course this month. Wow, for a big chunk of the movie it's on one--the scene to scene plot progression and presentation feels like it's way out there for awhile and kind of on pluto until things start to wrap up after the blackface number.

I'm not familiar with many older musicals or Fred Astaire. What a weird movie star that guy seems like. He's got such a goofy look to be a romantic lead but it works for the broad tone and comedy. There's lots of clever callbacks with words and things set up earlier showing up later at key points (e.g. the palmed ace). Stevens did a great job blocking a number of the dialogue scenes, so that there's some visual storytelling going on. 

 

Fred Astaire is definitely no Errol Flynn or Clark Gable because he spent nearly 30 years of his life perfecting his art in musical comedy shows and performances, dancing-- mixing tap, ballroom and ballet-- and singing-- when he was "Asked" to come to Hollywood to make musical films.

When you have perfected  a certain amount of talent, not just in dancing and singing, but also in acting, then you don't have to rely entirely upon your good looks or upon advancement that you may receive through your association with  middle-aged actresses  or  studio hacks.

  It's well to remember that when Fred Astaire came to Hollywood he was already a veteran Broadway star and a Royal Family favorite on the West End Stage in London.

So Fred Astaire didn't really come to Hollywood begging Warner Brothers or MGM to make him a star. RKO signed him up on his stage reputation.

They knew what they had and they simply took it from there.  So the studio did not have to spend  time and money coaching him on press interviews, elocution, stage movement etc because he was already a stage star-- after having spent his entire childhood in Vaudeville.

Yet, what Fred Astaire did was not just to become another movie star, but also to advance the genre of the film musical to another level --that's why he received a special Oscar.

He was the star performer in his films, but he also supervised the filming of his own dances -- he created a special dolly for the camera to give the audience the feel of actually watching him closeup on stage. Along with his choreographic assistant Hermes Pan, he was responsible for all of his choreography as a solo artist and with partners.

I could say it's not just a matter of musical comedy,  singing and dancing-- there are also a number of movie stars who aren't really what you would call technically beautiful, like Bette Davis or Spencer Tracy, but who had so much talent that the public simply accepted them and wanted to see their work.

No, I don't think Fred Astaire would have become a great movie star had he not been a great dance artist. However, you had at the same time, I think, other great dance artists who never became movie stars because they didn't have that certain quirky something, whether it was a down-to-earth homespun elegance or whatever Fred Astaire had that the public loved so much.

You could indeed say that Fred Astaire was a thin, slightly balding dancer who was definitely not just another pretty face. LOL

 

 

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15 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

WOMAN ON THE RUN (1950); Ann Sheridan 

Proof Ann Sheridan's career didn't end after Warner Brothers. She still appeared in some good films during the 1950s. 

I also love COME NEXT SPRING, a rural drama she made with Steve Cochran at Republic Pictures.

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16 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

This thread seems appropriate for General Discussions. Did TCM move it here?

I'm not sure, but I think it's best if it's not in General Discussions because there is a similar thread over there where people describe what they just watched (past tense). My understanding is FredCDobbs' created this thread to be more like a "live thread" with people talking about what they were watching right now-- in the moment.

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Watching FORT DEFIANCE (1951) on Starz.

It had been years since I'd seen it, probably the last time it aired on TCM (in 2011).

I always need ten minutes to get used to Cinecolor, which I find a very artificial coloring process. The dirt looks red. The guys' blue jeans look turquoise. Everything looks pastel.

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