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FredCDobbs

What Are You Watching Now?

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4 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

That is a great film! I especially enjoyed the jazz score and Harry Belafonte's song that he sings at the jazz club.  I thought the ending was especially poignant. 

Yes, it had been 5 years at least since I'd watched it. Forgot how good it was! The jazz music on the soundtrack gives the film a little something extra. It stays with you after the movie finishes playing. Belafonte is superb, though he's probably a better musician than he is an actor.

Ryan and Begley are outstanding. And so are the ladies in supporting roles (Winters and Grahame).

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, it had been 5 years at least since I'd watched it. Forgot how good it was! The jazz music on the soundtrack gives the film a little something extra. It stays with you after the movie finishes playing. Belafonte is superb, though he's probably a better musician than he is an actor.

Ryan and Begley are outstanding. And so are the ladies in supporting roles (Winters and Grahame).

Grahame and Winters are in very small roles.  Upon my first viewing, I didn't really see what the overall point was of either character, except Winters' character, I suppose, provided an insight into Robert Ryan's homelife.  On a subsequent viewing however, I found both ladies' parts very effective and found that they were important parts of the story.

Begley's part is excellent.  His demise is very bittersweet.  I almost want him to get away with his crime, just so he can stick it to "the man."  However, at the same time, he is so overcome with sheer anger toward his former employer that he gets sloppy and allows his anger to get the best of him.  I recently saw Begley in another noir, Backfire, and thought that Begley was excellent in his part as a member of law enforcement.  I liked to think that this was Begley's character from Odds Against Tomorrow.  Somewhere between 1950's Backfire and 1959's Odds Against Tomorrow, Begley got fired and he is now very upset.  

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6 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Grahame and Winters are in very small roles.  Upon my first viewing, I didn't really see what the overall point was of either character, except Winters' character, I suppose, provided an insight into Robert Ryan's homelife.  On a subsequent viewing however, I found both ladies' parts very effective and found that they were important parts of the story.

Begley's part is excellent.  His demise is very bittersweet.  I almost want him to get away with his crime, just so he can stick it to "the man."  However, at the same time, he is so overcome with sheer anger toward his former employer that he gets sloppy and allows his anger to get the best of him.  I recently saw Begley in another noir, Backfire, and thought that Begley was excellent in his part as a member of law enforcement.  I liked to think that this was Begley's character from Odds Against Tomorrow.  Somewhere between 1950's Backfire and 1959's Odds Against Tomorrow, Begley got fired and he is now very upset.  

Oh that's great...yes, like some sort of continuity between both movies.

I also was rooting for Begley, and I think that's because his acting made us sympathize with the character. Especially when he tried to throw the key to Belafonte as he was dying. He was like a surrogate father to him, their bond transcended racial barriers.

The women were like two sides of the same coin-- one was loyal (Winters) and the other was a cheater (Grahame). We were meant to think that Winters was too good for him and it drove him to take his frustrations out with Grahame, as well as agree to do the heist. I would liked to have had a scene at the end when Winters found out he died...since she was completely in the dark about his new job.

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On demand  at present is the powerful 1985 tv movie version of Death of a Salesman   You of all should know this, why has the 1951 Oscar nommed version starring *Fredric March never aired?

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19 minutes ago, spence said:

On demand  at present is the powerful 1985 tv movie version of Death of a Salesman   You of all should know this, why has the 1951 Oscar nommed version starring *Fredric March never aired?

Probably a rights issue. I wish TCM could show it. It was on YouTube not long ago. March gives an incredible performance in it.

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24 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

It was on YouTube not long ago. March gives an incredible performance in it.

It's still on Youtube...I was looking for another Frederic March and ran across it...looks like a pretty good print.  Must be public domain (or no complaints from Columbia) or they would've pulled it by now.

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I just finished the 13-part BBC series entitled To Serve Them All My Days about a WWI young vet relieved of duty due to injury and shell shock and who gets involved with teaching in elite all-boy boarding school in England. It was originally broadcast in 1980-1. I had a sort of like-dislike ambiguity about it but now that it's over, I have a sort of nostalgic view of it. It is possible, I have learned, to feel nostalgic even of things that are clearly outside of my own experience. Nostalgia is a quality, just like happy or sad. That little world and that little bit of history spanning 20 years and in another sense 14 episodes, is over. It's a good show and it seems to want to stay with me awhile.

In strident contrast I am now confronted with the second disc of Season One of The Handmaid's Tale. For those who know the story (based on novel and where a regular feature film was made) it is rather intense and depressing, a story of a dystopia involved with the subjection of women. but done so well that it's hard to ignore.. I was thinking how tough the lead heroine role must have been to play (admirably done by Elizabeth Moss Mad Men ). I would imagine it to be an exhausting experience. It seems to me that there is a corresponding but much less severe challenge present in the watching it.

 

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14 hours ago, TopBilled said:

MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945)

It had been a while since I watched it. 

Buddy you may have scooped me on this film?

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On 8/28/2019 at 10:53 PM, laffite said:

I just finished the 13-part BBC series entitled To Serve Them All My Days about a WWI young vet relieved of duty due to injury and shell shock and who gets involved with teaching in elite all-boy boarding school in England. It was originally broadcast in 1980-1. I had a sort of like-dislike ambiguity about it but now that it's over, I have a sort of nostalgic view of it. It is possible, I have learned, to feel nostalgic even of things that are clearly outside of my own experience. Nostalgia is a quality, just like happy or sad. That little world and that little bit of history spanning 20 years and in another sense 14 episodes, is over. It's a good show and it seems to want to stay with me awhile.

In strident contrast I am now confronted with the second disc of Season One of The Handmaid's Tale. For those who know the story (based on novel and where a regular feature film was made) it is rather intense and depressing, a story of a dystopia involved with the subjection of women. but done so well that it's hard to ignore.. I was thinking how tough the lead heroine role must have been to play (admirably done by Elizabeth Moss Mad Men ). I would imagine it to be an exhausting experience. It seems to me that there is a corresponding but much less severe challenge present in the watching it.

 

all of those absolutely tremendous WWII docu's must be mandatory viewing in schools for kids!

Now I know your not especially speaking of that, but still my statement remains   Anybody else agree?

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On 8/28/2019 at 10:09 PM, TopBilled said:

Probably a rights issue. I wish TCM could show it. It was on YouTube not long ago. March gives an incredible performance in it.

Just rewatched it twice while online   *Hoffman was utterly superb as Willie Loman-(pretty certain he won an Emmy)!  Too bad we can't see the *March version to compare though? (P.S. *Dustin poked his 81yr ild head out at poss Oscar season last year to promote a new release & was literally cut down to size by women that claimed during Death... he was sooo obnoxious towards them, he vanished ever since?

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5 minutes ago, spence said:

Buddy you may have scooped me on this film?

Do you mean to say you've never seen it? MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS is a great Columbia noir.

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I have finished the first season of The Handmaid's Tale after which I had to resist the urge to go out and torture someone. I have missed my last two SM meeting due the satisfaction of watching this and I got a call from my dominatrix who was wondering where the hell I have been. I could hear the cracking of her whip in the background. I said who needs a whip when you can engage high **** [m a s o c h i s m] just by sitting in front of the TV. This show is a masterpiece of dystopia. It just keeps on coming and very nearly get exhausting. One outrage against humanity after another. It is well conceived story though and it survives censure because of its artistic integrity and execution. I mentioned earlier that Elizabeth Moss is good in this but I found after awhile I began to tire of looking at her face. She has close ups galore most of which she is shown in the throes of various expressions of agony, physically and emotionally.  I have to say that I am indeed TIRED OF LOOKING AT THAT FACE. And although she is not bad looking it begins to strain credulity that she should be so desired by powerful men (or should i say VERY powerful men, since all men are powerful in comparison to women (unless he happens to be married to one he loves and have to watch her being a handmaid, or if you otherwise oppose the regime). Overexposure to this show should be avoided and I therefore believe, at least for myself, that binge watching is not recommended. I don't even have the Second Season in the queue as I am taking a break. It's not certain that I will even continue. Even if I can get through S2, there is a S3 as well. And if that's not enough, I read in the book section of the NYT that Margaret Atwood, whose novel the show is based, has just finished a 800-page sequel, which could mean another TV show. And now, to Season 3 (a new story each season) of Fargo. This show has gotten a little rough over the first two seasons, but it's a nursery rhyme in comparison, ///

 

///

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I am watching OF HUMAN BONDAGE (1934). I'd only seen the remakes, never the original.

I am at the 50-minute mark right now...and I have been enjoying it. 

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55 minutes ago, laffite said:

I have finished the first season of The Handmaid's Tale after which I had to resist the urge to go out and torture someone. I have missed my last two SM meeting due the satisfaction of watching this and I got a call from my dominatrix who was wondering where the hell I have been. I could hear the cracking of her whip in the background. I said who needs a whip when you can engage high **** [m a s o c h i s m] just by sitting in front of the TV. This show is a masterpiece of dystopia. It just keeps on coming and very nearly get exhausting. One outrage against humanity after another. It is well conceived story though and it survives censure because of its artistic integrity and execution. I mentioned earlier that Elizabeth Moss is good in this but I found after awhile I began to tire of looking at her face. She has close ups galore most of which she is shown in the throes of various expressions of agony, physically and emotionally.  I have to say that I am indeed TIRED OF LOOKING AT THAT FACE. And although she is not bad looking it begins to strain credulity that she should be so desired by powerful men (or should i say VERY powerful men, since all men are powerful in comparison to women (unless he happens to be married to one he loves and have to watch her being a handmaid, or if you otherwise oppose the regime). Overexposure to this show should be avoided and I therefore believe, at least for myself, that binge watching is not recommended. I don't even have the Second Season in the queue as I am taking a break. It's not certain that I will even continue. Even if I can get through S2, there is a S3 as well. And if that's not enough, I read in the book section of the NYT that Margaret Atwood, whose novel the show is based, has just finished a 800-page sequel, which could mean another TV show. And now, to Season 3 (a new story each season) of Fargo. This show has gotten a little rough over the first two seasons, but it's a nursery rhyme in comparison, ///

Some reviewer or another coined the term "misery porn" for shows that elicit the type of feeling you're describing watching The Handmaid's Tale. Shows that seem to wallow in making their characters miserable before occasionally killing them, making the surviving characters that much more miserable. The first show I recall getting that label was the AMC police mystery show The Killing, but the label has been given to other dark shows such as The Walking DeadThe Leftovers, and even Game of Thrones. There have been others, but my mind is still fuzzy from a nap and I can't recall any more at the moment.

I liked Fargo season one a lot, season two even more, but season three not as much. It's still worth seeing, and better than most else on TV at the time. Season four is said to be airing late next year.

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45 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Some reviewer or another coined the term "misery porn" for shows that elicit the type of feeling you're describing watching The Handmaid's Tale. Shows that seem to wallow in making their characters miserable before occasionally killing them, making the surviving characters that much more miserable. The first show I recall getting that label was the AMC police mystery show The Killing, but the label has been given to other dark shows such as The Walking DeadThe Leftovers, and even Game of Thrones. There have been others, but my mind is still fuzzy from a nap and I can't recall any more at the moment.

I liked Fargo season one a lot, season two even more, but season three not as much. It's still worth seeing, and better than most else on TV at the time. Season four is said to be airing late next year.

Interesting, but I don't consider THT as misery porn, per se (or at least the porn part) because the misery is commensurate with the level of dystopia that exist. And it helps immeasurably when the premise is interesting because it is rooted in a current-day reality setting and not simply a concocted futuristic fantasy setting as an excuse to showcase misery; as in, The Walking Dead, for instance. And it helps too that the show does not over do it ; if they did, then that would be porn. They maintain a certain artistic integrity by not going over the top. The misery is only to be expected considering the that horrific premise. And it is well done (to coin a phrase). So I respect the story and how it was handled. But all that doesn't make it any easier to take, at times.

Game of Thrones easily escapes being tabbed misery porn IMO because despite the harsher moments, the show is simply too good in so many respects ; characters, acting, dialogue, sets, ___ values (I can't think of the word), as well as story. (In GOT, the story suffers somewhat because it's just too long, but the underlying premise, the game, remains intact).

I loved Fargo SI, hated S2, so I hope that S3 rebounds.  True Detective S3 will available on the Flix on Sept 4. The Si was pretty good, S2 was a mess. The story was unintelligible to me. So hoping for another rebound here.

Soon, I hope to get aback to a movie, ha. I now have the Criterion Channel and it's a waste of I don't use it once in a while.

 

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The Alamo (1960) - DVD

w/ John Wayne (Col. Davy Crockett), Richard Widmark (Col. Jim Bowie), Laurence Harvey (Col. William Travis), Frankie Avalon, Patrick Wayne, Linda Cristal, Joan O'Brien, Chill Wills, Joseph Calleia. Plus Ken Curtis, Denver Pyle, Hank Worden, Olive Carey, Ruben Padilla (Generalissimo Antonio Miguel Lopez de Santa Ana) and Richard Boone (General Sam Houston). Written by James Edward Grant. Music by Dimitri Tomkin. And produced and directed by John Wayne.

The sixth movie in the John Wayne Film Collection. TB indicating earlier that The Horse Soldiers (1959) "feels like we're transitioning from the John Ford Stock Company to the John Wayne Stock Company". So, of course, The Alamo follows The Horse Soldiers on this collection.

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2 hours ago, LiamCasey said:

The Alamo (1960) - DVD

w/ John Wayne (Col. Davy Crockett), Richard Widmark (Col. Jim Bowie), Laurence Harvey (Col. William Travis), Frankie Avalon, Patrick Wayne, Linda Cristal, Joan O'Brien, Chill Wills, Joseph Calleia. Plus Ken Curtis, Denver Pyle, Hank Worden, Olive Carey, Ruben Padilla (Generalissimo Antonio Miguel Lopez de Santa Ana) and Richard Boone (General Sam Houston). Written by James Edward Grant. Music by Dimitri Tomkin. And produced and directed by John Wayne.

The sixth movie in the John Wayne Film Collection. TB indicating earlier that The Horse Soldiers (1959) "feels like we're transitioning from the John Ford Stock Company to the John Wayne Stock Company". So, of course, The Alamo follows The Horse Soldiers on this collection.

Yes, I think with THE ALAMO, it is definitely the John Wayne Stock Company. Wayne is now running the show, in front of and behind the camera...even if he still continues to collaborate with Ford on a few more projects.

Incidentally, Wayne was supposed to film this story for Herbert Yates at Republic circa 1953/1954. But they had a disagreement about the choice of leading lady (Yates was pushing for his wife Vera Ralston, with whom Duke had already done two movies in the mid-to-late '40s). Wayne wanted someone else to play the love interest. When Yates refused, Wayne walked away from the studio and formed Batjac Productions, which he initially used to do projects at Warner Brothers as a freelancer.

Yates went ahead and made his Alamo story, which became known as THE LAST COMMAND (1955). It starred Sterling Hayden and Anna Maria Alberghetti and was shot in TruColor. In the meanwhile, Wayne still intended to bring his own version to the screen, which he finally succeeded in doing at United Artists in 1960.

I tend to prefer the Yates-Republic version. I think its pacing is better. Wayne's version is too long. 

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57 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I'm watching NOB HILL (1945). Raft and Bennett always work so well together.

Geez   musta seen that on the late, late, late show in the mid 1980's-(to take another great line from THE HONEYMOONERS in another all-time episode, where Norton snuck down to watch tv in Ralph's apt)  TV OR NOT TV was it's title, are you a fan of them by the way Now many are ****in' & want to remove his other lifesize statue located at the NYC Bus Terminal? The other that got goldderby's Tom 0'Neil so furious, was built in frt of EMMY Headquarters, who never awarded The Great 0ne Jackie Gleason-(l9l6-87) 1ingle statue???

(TRIVIA/FUN/FACTS: as you know Gleason -(man, he was broke as a kid!), never won an Oscar either, just that 1 shot in The Hustler of course, but actually thought he'd go so far as walking down the aisle in/for 1963's Papa's Delicate Condition (***)

 

You of all musta seen this site to behold THE GREAT ONE-(&*Orson & Lucy started that nickname) him trippin out on LSD in 1968's just stunningly awful Skidoo?

 

What did you think mof NOB HILL by the way a wooden but truly tough guy/actor & Raft, died broke as well in 1980.

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23 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, I think with THE ALAMO, it is definitely the John Wayne Stock Company. Wayne is now running the show, in front of and behind the camera...even if he still continues to collaborate with Ford on a few more projects.

Incidentally, Wayne was supposed to film this story for Herbert Yates at Republic circa 1953/1954. But they had a disagreement about the choice of leading lady (Yates was pushing for his wife Vera Ralston, with whom Duke had already done two movies in the mid-to-late '40s). Wayne wanted someone else to play the love interest. When Yates refused, Wayne walked away from the studio and formed Batjac Productions, which he initially used to do projects at Warner Brothers as a freelancer.

Yates went ahead and made his Alamo story, which became known as THE LAST COMMAND (1955). It starred Sterling Hayden and Anna Maria Alberghetti and was shot in TruColor. In the meanwhile, Wayne still intended to bring his own version to the screen, which he finally succeeded in doing at United Artists in 1960.

I tend to prefer the Yates-Republic version. I think its pacing is better. Wayne's version is too long. 

People made light of that version, but you can easily see *JW took the *Ford mantle here & I think it's well made (***1/2) Not so sadly when he did '68's Green Berets.   Ever see the well made ($23m,.) (***) *Billy Bob Thornton version?

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On 8/31/2019 at 7:22 PM, TopBilled said:

I'm watching BABY FACE NELSON (1957) on YouTube.

Screen Shot 2019-08-31 at 4.06.49 PM.jpeg

The Mick was at times brilliant in this cheapo gangster flick.  Haven't seen it since the '80's also on very late tv-(my favorite time by far of the day, how about yourself?)   Cary Grant without pause when asked who's the most talented actor in Hollywood, "MICKEY ROONEY" always his quick answer

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8 minutes ago, spence said:

What did you think of NOB HILL by the way a wooden but truly tough guy/actor & Raft, died broke as well in 1980.

Thanks for asking, Spence! I just finished it. I'm a huge-huge fan of George Raft. And also Joan Bennett. So I enjoyed the film very much. I think Raft's personality comes through in almost all his roles. What we see on screen is the real deal. Bennett is much more poised, mannered (a bit artificial if the role calls for it)...and Raft has this way of pulling her down to earth. In NOB HILL, that was needed because she's playing an upper class woman who is slumming with him.

They previously did the screwball comedy SHE COULDN'T TAKE IT (1935), and the gangster drama THE HOUSE ACROSS THE BAY (1940). 

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Another string pc of work by Mickey was the remake in 1959 of where The Great: Spencer Tracy got his teeth on, on stage in The Last Mile

They say the rarely impressed *Ford went every night for 4 consecutive nights to see him as Killer Mears & then of course brought him to just then Fox Studios in 1930 for the prison comedy Up the River (Fox) (***)

 

A question that always bothered me, why did the make the 1930 version of it with dullard Preston Foster VS. *Tracy?   Meaning of course The Last Mile, I mean as *Kate said he started out a bit in gangster roles anyway?

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