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Season Six of The Golden Girls. I absolutely love this show; all four actresses are phenomenal. This is one of the shows that I re-watch over and over again.

 

Sophia: She weighed 32 pounds.

Dorothy: Ma, no one weighs 32 pounds when they're born.

Sophia: That's what the man at the circus said!

 

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I'm watching With Six You Get Eggroll which came on right after Yours, Mine and Ours.  Every time I see 'Eggroll,' I can't help but think how homely the youngest son is.  He looks like a miniature Mo Rocca from the "I Love the 70s, 80s, 90s, etc." shows that were on VH1 10 years back.  

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I just finished watching "M" with Peter Lorre that I recorded a few days ago as part of the Weimar Republic film series on TCM.

 

It was AMAZING.  I didn't know what I was getting into but I would call this a real experience and a true classic.  The story, direction and the acting were fantastic.  It is hard to image they did this back in the early 30's.

 

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Planning on watching these 4 over the weekend: The Letter (1940), Mrs. Miniver (1942), Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), & Take Me Out to the Ballgame (1949). I just added these to my DVD collection (I got them for $1.99 each)! I haven't seen The Letter or all of Till the Clouds Roll By. The other 2 I've seen before.

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Planning on watching these 4 over the weekend: The Letter (1940), Mrs. Miniver (1942), Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), & Take Me Out to the Ballgame (1949). I just added these to my DVD collection (I got them for $1.99 each)! I haven't seen The Letter or all of Till the Clouds Roll By. The other 2 I've seen before.

Ooh I love "The Letter." It has hands down, one of the best movie openings ever.

 

Let me know after you watch it if you're like me and get John Stephenson and Herbert Marshall confused.

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I was watching Viva Las Vegas.  I know Elvis wasn't known as a great actor and he's really not.  But I love Ann-Margret and there's no denying the chemistry that these two share in this film.  I've seen this film twice now and I always feel like I need to go out running for 12 hours straight, seven days a week to have any chance at attaining Ann-Margret's fabulous figure.  I love this movie.  I love the music.  I love the costumes.  It would never win any awards, but it's a fun movie and sometimes that's all you need.

 

Now, I'm watching Gentleman Jim.  After getting all hot and bothered discussing Errol Flynn's tights and thigh high boots in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex in the "Favorites" thread, I needed to see Flynn.  In this film, he wears tight pants, wet tight pants, short shorts, a union suit, a top hat and tails, and he makes all of them look good! He looks good hungover.  He looks good with a fat lip and black eye.  I'd sign up to be the "cut man" in his corner! 

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Watching a recording from the other day:

"Sex Kittens go to College"

What a cast:

Besides Mamie Van Doren, Marty Milner and Tuesday Weld there are

Louis Nye, John Carradine, Mickey Shaughnessy, Jackie Coogan and even Conway Twitty & WooWoo Grabowski

Where have they been hiding this one??

KLASSIK!!

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The Fly (1958) - TCM

 

This movie includes Vincent Price in one of my favorite of his roles as the title character's brother and the always worthwhile Herbert Marshall as the inspector. But it is Patricia Owens as the title character's wife that truly carries this film for me since we have many scenes where she is the only one capable of delivering dialogue and the only one capable of showing a reaction to what is happening. And the whole movie would have fallen apart if Ms. Owens failed at those scenes.

 

Between the local weather and the domestic tasks that I need to accomplish, I suspect that I'll be inside all day and spending it with TCM up to and including this evening's The Uninvited (1944).

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Soylent Green (1973) - TCM

Planet of the Apes (1968). Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970). The Omega Man (1971). And then Soylent Green. As Ben Mankiewicz touched upon in his introduction, Charlton Heston sure had a negative view of our future. Not that I think there is anything wrong with that (at least from a cinematic point-of-view). As much as I enjoy Star Trek and Star Wars movies, one always goes into those types of movies with the knowledge that they will end on a more or less optimistic note which forces them to be more or less predictable. Not so with dystopian movies like this one which I believe requires the viewer to be more engaged on an intellectual level. To be honest, sometimes I think that Star Wars (1977) was the worse thing that ever happened to Hollywood science-fiction.

As for this one in particular, the high point for me (as I suspect it is for many) is the death scene for Edward G. Robinson's character with Mr. Heston's character in attendance. Both actors were at their best in that one. And having both state that they loved the other in that scene was the absolute right thing to do. Hard to believe Mr. Robinson had the emotional strength to do such a scene knowing that he was soon to die in real life. I know that I couldn't have done it.

 
Mr. Mankiewicz also made mention that Soylent Green won the Nebula Award for 1973. Personally my preferred science-fiction movie for that year is Westworld with Yul Brynner. So I guess I have Rameses beating Moses.
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Five Million Years to Earth (1967) - TCM

 

The statement by darkblue in another thread that this one gets shown quite often is a valid one. But I've always found Five Million Years to Earth worth rewatching. Which probably explains why, no matter how much I like Brian Donlevy as an actor, Andrew Keir is what I see in my mind's eye when I hear or read the word "Quatermass".

 

And, let's be honest, Barbara Shelley is always worth rewatching too!

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Countdown (1968) - TCM

 
This is my first time seeing this movie. And I suspect it will be my last.
 
The synopsis for this movie within Time Warner Cable's online guide is the highly erroneous "Feature version of "Lassie" episodes". But, to be honest, this movie is so unexciting up to this point that I am kinda hoping for Lassie to show up and channel her inner Laika just for a change of pace.
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Countdown (1968) - TCM

 
This is my first time seeing this movie. And I suspect it will be my last.
 
The synopsis for this movie within Time Warner Cable's online guide is the highly erroneous "Feature version of "Lassie" episodes". But, to be honest, this movie is so unexciting up to this point that I am kinda hoping for Lassie to show up and channel her inner Laika just for a change of pace.

 

 

Yes, we caught part of this last night and definitely a BAD film.

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Yes, we caught part of this last night and definitely a BAD film.

 

Hard to believe that this movie was directed by the same Robert Altman who, only two years later, gave us M*A*S*H (1970).

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C'mon, you actually favour Raymond Burr over Capt Bill Shatner? :D

Yes, since Burr grew up near where I live. However,  when it comes to Canadian actors still living, it is Bill Shatner for sure. :)

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Countdown (1968) - TCM

 
This is my first time seeing this movie. And I suspect it will be my last.
 
 

 

Hard to believe that this movie was directed by the same Robert Altman who, only two years later, gave us M*A*S*H (1970).

 

Yes, Robert Altman had very little creative control in his work on COUNTDOWN, working under the constraints of a "director for hire."

 

In his later movies--- M*A*S*H, BREWSTER McCLOUD, McCABE & MRS. MILLER, NASHVILLE, 3 WOMEN--- he would have the artistic control that allowed his personal style to flourish and established him as one of the important figures of the Hollywood Renaissance.    

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I've been watching two films I haven't seen in quite a while: "The Two Mrs. Carrolls" and "Cry Wolf."

 

I had mentioned in another thread that I thought "Carrolls" had problems in the script, but as I look again it really seems to me like it's a neat little thriller. Sure, Hitchcock would have added much, but... Some pan Bogart's performance but I thought he was believable as a man who's a little 'bent' upstairs. Stanwyck has some moments of forced/unnatural acting in the beginning, but eventually she hits her stride. The viewer can focus on her dilemma and we wonder how she'll get herself out of it. Interesting twists and turns in the plot. I love the set of the estate and the dark lighting. Alexis Smith did a great job as a sharp and sexy 'other woman'.

 

The ending is exciting and I also love the moment when (SPOILER):

 

 

 

 

 

Sally discovers Geoffrey's painting of her as an Angel of Death. The painting, too, is striking and shocking.

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Updating my last post: as said, I'm also watching "Cry Wolf".

 

Like the pairing of Stanwyck and Bogart, Stanwyck with Errol Flynn also works well. They do their best with the material that's there. But for some time while watching the film, I'm waiting for something to 'happen'. There's mystery and a lot of 'clues' given, but it's a whole lot of talk and a lot of time focused on the fears of the Geraldine Brooks character.

 

Finally, though, with the scene of Stanwyck going up the dumwaiter, things are heating up. The turn of events with the Geraldine Brooks character, Stanwyck scrambling across the roof, the scary confrontation with Flynn and Flynn's menacing side really coming out, it's getting better.

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