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?In Our Time?: boring


FredCDobbs
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Oh, what a boring movie!. The first hour was a copy of the opening of ?Rebecca?, with Ida playing the shy ?paid companion and traveling secretary? role to the rich old candy-eating lady, and Henried played the Maxim de Winter role.

 

On and on and on and on.

 

Finally, they got married. (I knew they would, because I?ve already seen ?Rebecca?.)

 

Now they are trying to teach Polish peasants how to farm with a tractor. (No wonder Poland was so easily invaded.)

 

Yaaawwwnnnnnn...

 

When do we get to the Nazi attack and fighting back part? The movie?s almost over.

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> {quote:title=cinemafan wrote:}{quote}

> Fred, I just caught the end. What was with those unusual musical notes being played over and over?

> (I'm hoping it wasn't in my head.)

 

I didn?t notice, but it might have been a recurring theme from Chopin from a Polish music box mentioned earlier in the movie.

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The key question isn't whether the movie is boring, it's how the movies made tens of millions of Americans more ready to indulge Poland's postwar communist government. Or at least that's what one Polish-American historian claims in a new book from the University Press of Kentucky.

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> {quote:title=skimpole wrote:}{quote}

> The key question isn't whether the movie is boring, it's how the movies made tens of millions of Americans more ready to indulge Poland's postwar communist government. Or at least that's what one Polish-American historian claims in a new book from the University Press of Kentucky.

 

So do you think the film might have been some kind of Communist propaganda? Maybe that?s why they talked so much about the arrogance of aristocrats, ?modernizing the farm?, ?utilizing tractors?, and ?freeing the peasants?.

 

----------------------

 

PS: Howard Koch was one of the two screenwriters.

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0462321/bio

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Fred: I saw this for the first time last week and liked it. There was a similarity to Rebecca in the beginning but it was the aristocracy that came out as fools in the film. First, Jennifer's snobby in-laws rate her as not good enough for their heir, then they don't want modern influences even though they increase production and profits. The farmers are like the rest of us, they fumble the machinery at first but get the hang of it and better themselves. Finally, all of them stand up to the Nazis and burn the wheat and the family home rather than let them get it while the husband joins the fight. I see very few films about Poland's role in the war and this portrays them as able to learn and courageous. It was a two-star film but not a total waste. I usually stand with you FredC but not this time. I'm glad I tuned in.

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This was the first time I had seen the picture. Definitely had elements of REBECCA and GONE WITH THE WIND. I enjoyed Franz Waxman's score and thought Lupino was, as always, excellent. When Ashley, I mean Stefan, came back from battle, it looked like his monologue filmed-in-closeup was an insert done in a pick-up or post-preview session. His make up was radically different, without most of the aberrations and contusions that were on his face in the other shots. It was nice to see another film with Michael Chekov of the Moscow Art Theater. Nazimova only made one more film after this, SINCE YOU WENT AWAY. But I thought the script was a mish-mosh and, as a whole, was less successful than individual scenes.

 

But any chance to watch Victor Francen is always worth the price of admission.

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