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The schedule of June 11th finally revealed - Jacques Cousteau Day


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Why would it be a joke? People around here are always saying they would appreciate documentaries on TCM. Well, in my opinion, there are none better. A great way to honor a great man, and perfect timing, too. By June 11th, there probably won't be a lot of sea life left in the Gulf. Since my brother just cancelled his family's vacation to Florida, they'll have something to remind them of how the ocean used to look. Spill, baby, spill.

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What were his contributions to the cinema, exactly?

 

If TCM is going to ape the Biography channel, how about a documentary on the guy who invented indoor plumbing? I like Julia Child, and heck, she even had a film made about her, how about a documentary about Julia Child?

 

I'd rather see a documentary about the guy or gal who invented something that the movies now cannot live without. I bet there are tons of obscure people, heck they're featured in the obits every year at the SAGs, who deserve a documentary about their lives.

 

I'd rather see one about Desi Arnaz, who brought the three camera system to television. How about the person who invented the mute button, I owe him or her a great deal.

 

Jean Cocteau oui, but Jacques Cousteau, non.

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This is *appalling*. TCM is not Discovery. TCM is not National Geographic. TCM is not the History Channel. With hundreds and hundreds of films languishing in studio vaults, we get an entire day of this? Somebody should be fired.

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*What were his contributions to the cinema, exactly?* - pp

 

TCM honors our war dead on Memorial Day, and our vets on Veterans Day. Their contributions to cinema? Nil. TCM programs Christmas movies in December, and Easter movies, too. Jesus Christ's contribution to cinema? Zero. TCM honors Martin Luther King, Jr. on his birthday. His contribution to cinema? The same. They've also honored the Wright Brothers, not noted filmmakers. And on and on and on...

 

Jacques Cousteau made documentaries about the world's oceans. TCM is not showing a documentary about Jacques Cousteau. Many of the reefs that were filmed are already long gone, and it will be nice to see these little time capsules again.

 

If you're having a fit because these were not shown in theaters, tough. Neither were the Dick Cavett interviews, Elvis's concerts, the Judy Garland TV specials, the Frank Sinatra TV shows... And they've been showing movies that were pieced together from TV series.

 

One day of PBS documentaries isn't going to kill you, unless your conservative mind is just too closed to watch programming from such a bastion of liberality. :-)

 

Thanks for the day of Cousteau, TCM!

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I think you're overreacting just a little. Cousteau was innovative for many different reasons. Firstly he coninvented the aqualung or scuba system. He experimented with different gas mixtures to prolong deep diving which is commonplace now. He also developed several underwater camera systems to enable cinematographers to freely film beneath the sea. He developed a diving saucer ; a submersible years before others did.To say that TCM couldn't honor the man for one day is not asking too muc. Perhaps they should show several movies with key underwater scenes.That way, you might begin to more readily appreciate the man's greatness. He won two academy awards for his "The Silent World" and "The Living Sea". That should count for something. Best, BruceG.

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> {quote:title=BruceGhent wrote:}{quote}

> I think you're overreacting just a little. Cousteau was innovative for many different reasons. Firstly he coninvented the aqualung or scuba system. He experimented with different gas mixtures to prolong deep diving which is commonplace now. He also developed several underwater camera systems to enable cinematographers to freely film beneath the sea. He developed a diving saucer ; a submersible years before others did.To say that TCM couldn't honor the man for one day is not asking too muc. Perhaps they should show several movies with key underwater scenes.That way, you might begin to more readily appreciate the man's greatness. He won two academy awards for his "The Silent World" and "The Living Sea". That should count for something. Best, BruceG.

I think TCM is straying too far from it's base...much too far.

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> {quote:title=BruceGhent wrote:}{quote}

> I think you're overreacting just a little. Cousteau was innovative for many different reasons. Firstly he coninvented the aqualung or scuba system. He experimented with different gas mixtures to prolong deep diving which is commonplace now. He also developed several underwater camera systems to enable cinematographers to freely film beneath the sea. He developed a diving saucer ; a submersible years before others did.To say that TCM couldn't honor the man for one day is not asking too muc. Perhaps they should show several movies with key underwater scenes.That way, you might begin to more readily appreciate the man's greatness. He won two academy awards for his "The Silent World" and "The Living Sea". That should count for something. Best, BruceG.

 

 

I agree.

 

It's a great left-field addition to the June theme of underwater films.

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I am more than fine with a day of Cousteau films/docs - regardless of where they were first presented. Of course I remember the "Documentary Film Month" of the late 1990s fondly too. I cherish my tape containing "The Kennedy Trilogy" made that month. I want to say that TCM even showed *Olympia* and *Triumph Of The Will* that month but I can't confirm it.

 

TCM and documentary films are not a new phenomena. There have been showings of the Frank Capra and John Ford WWII film unit films. TCM has presented concert films such as *Elvis: That's The Way It Is* and *The Last Waltz*. During a tribute to Louis Malle TCM included his film *God's Country*. And this month will include a showing of *Nanook Of The North* while June brings *Word Is Out*. This has been a long tradition for the channel.

 

From *Four Days In November* to *Grey Gardens*, *For All Mankind* to *Salesman*, I am thankful for all the documentaries TCM has presented over the years as they are important parts of the film heritage TCM wishes to celebrate. It is too bad that the Oscar-winning Cousteau films are not part of the schedule - but it is great that TCM is showing the films they are.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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If you're having a fit because these were not shown in theaters, tough

 

Oh my, that's not a very nice thing to say, now is it? Isn't it you who is the champion of free speech and even freer *opinions* on this board?

 

One day of PBS documentaries isn't going to kill you, unless your conservative mind is just too closed to watch programming from such a bastion of liberality.

 

Ouch. And here I thought you were a nice person. Tsk, tsk, I'm quite surprised at you. I'll have to remember this next time your get on your white charger to defend those of us here from the guys with the black hats.

 

Oh, and simply because you continue to berate me, that does not mean I will ever change my *opinion* (shall I repeat the word to which I am entitled - *opinion* - ?)that Cousteau does not belong on TCM.

 

Perhaps they should show several movies with key underwater scenes.

 

BruceGhent, they could show the heart-wrenching final scene in Godzilla, the one with Raymond Burr. At least that way, the day would have something to do with movies. :)

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> {quote:title=BruceGhent wrote:}{quote}

> Cousteau was innovative for many different reasons. Firstly he coninvented the aqualung or scuba system. He experimented with different gas mixtures to prolong deep diving which is commonplace now. He also developed several underwater camera systems to enable cinematographers to freely film beneath the sea.

 

Thanks for writing this in his defense.

Cousteau is a very important element in film history, if only for his innovations in underwater photography. These documentaries were very popular "specials" on TV and rightly so because the footage was pieced together to make comprehensive entertaining stories.

OK, so it's a bit of a stretch to call them "classic movies", but they definitely should be considered "classic film documentaries".

 

Why not give a few a try and see for yourself?

It's kind of sad to me people these days are just not more familiar with Jacques and his late son Phillipe's very important marine conservation work and their contribution to the film industry.

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TikiSoo, I respect your opinions and your posts.

 

I am quite interested in the importance of marine life and oceanic preservation and the coral reefs and the befouling of the world's beaches and loathe and despise the arrogance with which the Japanese treat whales as if they were their own personal buffet table. If I could, I would join Greenpeace and do my best to sink every single whaling ship, all on my own. However, I can't.

 

That said, TCM has, as you know, shown fewer and fewer and fewer (I don't believe the counts to the opposite, sorry, so all those with the stats, don't bother) black and white classic movies and is showing more and more and more newly christened classic movies, i.e., made over the past 30 years, what a joke. Since they are now taking up valuable air time with documentaries to great men and women -- I still want to see one devoted to Mr. Thomas Crapper -- who are only peripherally connected to the entertainment industry, I believe I have the right (although some would disagree) to voice my displeasure.

 

Since I want you to give me the right to complain as much as I freely give you the right to wax ecstatic about Jean Cocteau, er, I mean Inspector Clouseau, um I mean Jacque Cousteau, I bow to your opinion. Ah, such a lovely word, o-pin-ion, don't you think?

 

What I want to know, since TCM is so passionately invested in marine health, when will they be showing a documentary on Steve Irwin? He did as much to get the importance of the ocean in the chain of life to the forefront of the media, where those who arrogantly think they are the be-all and end-all of the species can see it on their iphones or ipads or whatever it is they are glued to, as Mr. Cocteau, ack, Clouseau, ick, Cousteau.

 

:)

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> {quote:title=primosprimos wrote:}{quote}

> > That said, TCM has, as you know, shown fewer and fewer and fewer ( *I don't believe the counts to the opposite, sorry, so all those with the stats, don't bother* ) black and white classic movies...

 

LOL, that's right, don't let facts get in the way of an unsupportable feeling.

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Quite true. Interesting how you ignored the rest of the post.

 

On your beloved states - depends on the time of day the b/w films are shown. They're not shown in prime time as they once were. They're not shown as often as they once were. The channel is glutted with more recent movies than it was 10 years ago. Et cetera, et cetera.

 

Come up with any stats you like, TCM is not what it once was. It's evident simply by them thinking they are the BIO channel.

 

There now, don't you feel silly?

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"That said, TCM has, as you know, shown fewer and fewer and fewer (I don't believe the counts to the opposite, sorry, so all those with the stats, don't bother) black and white classic movies and is showing more and more and more newly christened classic movies, i.e., made over the past 30 years, what a joke. "

 

Even though the stats say that TCM is showing films from the same time period that they always have, there has been a definite shift in what gets shown and when. Primetime has had many more modern films than was the case in years past. Although they have often put the films from the early 30's on in the early morning hours, it seems over the last year and a half they have often been the 2/5 star films by Pathe while the classic Warner and MGM precodes stay locked in the vaults. In the last 3 years has Paid been broadcast? The Man Who Played God or Parachute Jumper? Any of the Warner Brothers Jolson films? Lights of New York? Warner Brothers owns the rights to all of these films yet they are nowhere to be found on TCM's schedule. Meanwhile, "Some Like It Hot" - which is a United Artists property - has been aired about once a month.

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Primetime has had many more modern films than was the case in years past.

 

Exactly. Which belies the TCM is showing the same quality of films as they always have nonsense.

 

No matter. This topic comes up over and over and there will always be those who cheerlead on behalf of TCM, and those who see TCM for what it is. Better than any other regular cable channel and most premium pay channels, but not what it once was.

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