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RICH'S B (AND WORSE) JUVENILE DELINQUENT THREAD


scsu1975
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Lost, Lonely and Vicious (1958)
Directed by Frank Myers

http://www.archive.org/details/Lost_Lonely_and_Vicious_1958

Extremely dull "docudrama" of one Johnnie Dennis, young movie star, who alternates between being a nice guy and a mope. That's the movie.

The opening narration goes as follows: "In this town of make believe, the truth behind the scenes is also filled with drama - blah blah blah - against this Hollywood backdrop of fantasy, yesterday's teenager, now growing up, faces tomorrow, still searching for kicks, but deeply searching for meaning." I deeply searched this film for meaning, but only came up with gas. Even the scene during the opening credits makes no sense.

Unknown Ken Clayton plays Johnnie. At the start of the film, Clayton bears a slight resemblance to James Dean; by the end of the film, he looks more like liberal columnist David Corn of "Mother Jones." Lilyan Chauvin, the only recognizable face in the cast, plays Clayton's acting coach. However, we never see her coaching him, and she just seems to appear in scenes for no reason. Cute Barbara Wilson plays Clayton's love interest - but you have to wait about 55 minutes before they finally make out, at which point we also see Wilson's stuffed animal fall from the sofa. The symbolism escapes me. Richard Gilden plays Walt, but I have no idea what he is doing in the picture. He works on his car, gets into two fights with Clayton (some of the body positions these two get in are hysterical), and generally ticks everyone off. Gilden is cursed with a double-whammy; he looks uncannily like 40s B-movie star Dave O'Brien, and sounds uncannily like 50s Z-movie star John Agar. Gilden has a pal named Pig, and there is a blonde dame named Darlene who shakes her rear end a lot. There is lots of stock footage of Hollywood, even though the film was shot in Tuscaloosa.

Clayton seems obsessed with death; I'll admit I considered it myself while watching this bilge. Then he is Mr. Nice Guy for awhile, then, in the climax, decides to drive at a high speed down the highway in his sports car (hey, does this remind you of any young actor with the identical initials of J.D.?) while Wilson is reading a letter he wrote to her.

If you are still awake after 70 minutes, you'll hear more psychobabble from the narrator: "And so, with an actor's dramatics, John Dennis comes to a crossroads in life."

Will Johnnie crash? Will true love win out? Will the stuffed animal fall off the sofa again?





Gilden tries to impress Chauvin by showing he can balance two tiny dancers on his shoulder.
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I'm no doctor, but this guy really needs to see a urologist.
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Ninotchka on a really bad day.
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"It's my turn to change the oil!"
"No, it's mine!"
"Is not!"
"Is too!"
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I think that stuffed animal is worried it's going to take another tumble.
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Zamfir hits the skids.
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> {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> I think that stuffed animal is worried it's going to take another tumble.

> Untitled5-65.png

 

LOL!!!!

 

I thought the title of this film was a description of how you were feeling after a day of teaching. Glad to see you still have your sense of humor. :D:D

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  • 3 weeks later...

The Beatniks (1960, although the film's credits say 1958)
Directed by Paul Frees

http://www.archive.org/details/the_beatniks

This is faulty advertising. There are no beatniks in this film. There are no goatees, no bongos, no poetry readings, and no intellectuals; however, there are plenty of stupid people.

Tony Travis plays Eddy Crane, the leader of a bunch of morons. In the film's opening scene, they don masks and knock over a liquor store, then head to a greasy spoon. Eddy's babe Iris, played by Karen Kadler (a dead-ringer for Mara Corday) convinces him to sing a song while the jukebox is on. So we get treated to lyrics like this:

"Leather coat, duckbill hair, call me wild, I don't care.
Sideburns don't need your sympathy.
Save your tears, don't cry for me, I'll get along, just let me be,
Sideburns don't need your sympathy."

A talent scout just happens to be standing by the phone while this is going on, and convinces Eddy to go for an audition. This is the same guy who convinced Klinton Spilsbury he'd be perfect as The Lone Ranger.

Eddy tries out, and meets cool blonde receptionist Helen, played by Joyce Terry. It is love at first sight. Eddy goes on television (director Paul Frees lends his announcing voice) and we suffer through

"Anything your little heart desires,
Your slightest wish is my command,
There's nothing I won't do,
I'm so in love with you"

Eddy becomes an overnight sensation, probably because the viewing audience is deaf and blind. However, he is unable to shake the losers he hangs with, especially the psychotic "Moon," played by Peter Breck.

Eventually, they all end up in a bar, where Breck clocks the bartender with a bottle of booze. The bartender gets off a shot and wounds one of the gang. This could have a negative impact on Eddy's career, so he calls Helen and tells her he is giving up his singing. The audience breathes a sigh of relief. Then he changes his mind. The audience walks out.

In the exciting climax, Eddy confesses all to Helen, Moon knifes Eddy's agent, and Eddy and Moon duke it out. Then Eddy decides to face the music (not his own, unfortunately) and take his medicine (by this point, I had a few belts myself).

I'm not sure why a voice-over specialist like Paul Frees decided to direct this (he also wrote it, and is credited with some of the songs). Coincidentally, there seem to be a lot of voice-overs in this film, including Frees doing a detective's voice. Travis is okay as an actor, and not bad as a singer, despite the lousy songs. He looks like the product of a love triangle between Steve Cochran, James Farentino, and Hal March. Breck is over-the-top and irritating; you'll want him killed off immediately, but no such luck. The girls are good looking.

My favorite scene is when the hotel manager, played by Claude Stroud, tries to assert his authority after the gang trash a room.

Stroud: "Oh my goodness, what have you done to the room? Why, this is terrible. Uh, you'll pay for this. ... Why, you young hoodlums, I'll call the police."
Breck: "Hey man, you say one word to anyone and I'm gonna moon you."
Stroud: "You're gonna what ?"
Breck: "Moon you!"

After listening to Stroud, I now know what Porky Pig would sound like if he led an alternative lifestyle.



Larry Fine is the victim of a holdup.
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Mrs. Manicotti does the mambo.
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"Is this the party to whom I am speaking?"
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"Hey, Daddy-o, what do you mean they canceled The Big Valley?"
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"Sideburns don't need your sympathy. However, my career does."
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"Okay, Weiner, now you're gonna pay for tweeting my kid sister!"
ZPeEira.jpg




This film could have used a lot more of this.
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> {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> "Leather coat, duckbill hair, call me wild, I don't care.

> Sideburns don't need your sympathy.

> Save your tears, don't cry for me, I'll get along, just let me be,

> Sideburns don't need your sympathy."

 

Duck bill hair? I recall a haircut called the "DA," which was short for "duck's a*s." It did indeed look like a duck's tail. I never heard of a duckbill haircut. I had a flattop, and used Lucky Tiger butch wax. Adults considered DAs to be obscene... it was a different era.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Jun 12, 2011 9:59 PM

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Jun 12, 2011 10:00 PM

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> I never heard of a duckbill haircut.

 

Me neither, so I went back and checked, and that's what he says. The song begins at the 7:00 minute mark. It's a gas, man.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}> Duck bill hair? I recall a haircut called the "DA," which was short for "duck's a*s." It did indeed look like a duck's tail. I never heard of a duckbill haircut. I had a flattop, and used Lucky Tiger butch wax.

 

We called it a "duck tail" haircut. If I recall correctly, Lucky Tiger was somewhat pink, wasn't it?

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> We called it a "duck tail" haircut. If I recall correctly, Lucky Tiger was somewhat pink, wasn't it?

 

"Ducktail" was the polite name for it, but at least in Oklahoma City, where I lived in the mid-50s, it was commonly called a "D.A.," short for duck'sass.

 

Lucky Tiger... it's been so long... I think it was closer to red than pink, and in a flatter jar than the one shown below. I do recall liking the drawing of the tiger on the label. So, I'd guess that the jar below was a later version than the ones I used. It looks more 60s.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Jun 13, 2011 9:58 PM

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