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One Flew Over The Cukoo's Nest tonight


WhyaDuck
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This is a great movie. In the book, the Indian doesn't know what is real or not real, or if any of this ever happens. Kirk Douglas wanted to be RP McMurphy, but son Michael Douglas went with Jack Nicholson and you can't say it was a bad choice. Jack nails this one. I'm looking forward to it, with my main focus on the Indian and McMurphy as in the book.

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Kirk was really upset with Michael for not casting him in the role he created on stage, and Ken Kesey said that Kirk was the best R.P. McMurphy ever. Kirk co starred on Broadway with Gene Wilder as Billy Babbit and Ed Ames as Chief Bromden. But the film is an American masterpiece and deserved every Award it received.....

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Kirk had the rights to *Cuckoo's Nest* from the early 1960s. It was his dream to play RP McMurphy on film but he could never find financing.

 

By the time his son was able to secure financing for the picture, Douglas was too old for the part and the producers went after Jack Nicholson.

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I haven't seen this in years, so I'm looking forward to it. Also, I recall someone on the board, not too long ago, complaining that it is never shown. I hope they catch it!

 

I read the book, before I saw the film. Nicholson doesn't physically resemble Randall Patrick Murphy in the slightest. RPM was a tall husky, red headed Irishman. None the less, Jack did quite well with the role. I like Will Sampson in it a lot, but my favorite performance is Brad Dourif as Billy. I think the film did a very good job of presenting the book.

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Sensational movie. As faithful an adaptation as you could ask for, it's dark, thought provoking, tragic and funny. Expertly scripted, I agree with all the choices I can think of off hand. Nicholson's best work. Milos Forman's masterpiece. Dourif, Fletcher and, especially, the ensemble, play their parts without flaw. There's a "Best of The 1970's" collection in the stores lately. For once, they're right on target. ANNIE HALL, DOG DAY AFTERNOON, and this lovely bit of cinematic poetry.

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