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Happy 35th Anniversary: Jaws (1975)!


CelluloidKid
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Jaws is regarded as a watershed film in motion picture history, the father of the summer blockbuster film and one of the first "high concept" films.

 

 

Due to the film's success in advance screenings, studio executives decided to distribute it in a much wider release than ever before. The Omen followed suit in the summer of 1976 and then Star Wars one year later in 1977, cementing the notion for movie studios to distribute their big-release action and adventure pictures (commonly referred to as tentpole pictures) during the summer.

 

 

Jaws is widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. It was number 48 on American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movies, a list of the greatest American films of all time, dropping down to number 56 on the 10 Year Anniversary list. It ranked second on a similar list for thrillers, 100 Years... 100 Thrills.

 

 

 

 

<ahttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/eb/JAWS_Movie_poster.jpg>

 

 

 

 

<ahttp://www.thewordslinger.com/media/images/JAWS_Steven_Bruce.png>

 

*STEVEN AND "BRUCE" SMILE FOR THE CAMERA*

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  • 3 weeks later...

Scariest movie I've ever seen. It's easy to cite the negative impact of the blockbuster on the film industry. It's plain to see what's transpired since 1974. But to undermine the expert cinematic storytelling of this outstanding thriller would be unfair. The tension is almost unbearable. The music alone makes you shiver. The characterizations are likeable and intriguing. The plot, simple and satisfying, is beautifully established and nurtured throughout this wonderful adventure.

 

Brilliantly marketed across the nation, consumers were convinced they simply had to see this thing. Why? Because the studios told them so! But I don't want to dilute my own argument. Say what you will about the external effects of this pioneer movie. Then get some popcorn and have a seat. You'll enjoy a well written, perfectly structured, unbelievably suspenseful show. To this day, I've never seen anything like it.

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Whenever I think of *Jaws*, I think of the film editor, Verna Fields, who helped make this film as great as it is. Since she didn't have any usable footage of the shark, she went with the idea of making the shark menacing as she could, for as long as she could, without being able to show it.

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I am just now watching *Jaws* on Encore. One of the scariest moments for me is the scene when Brody is sitting on the beach, and his wife is sunbathing, and as the scene switches back and forth between Brody and the water, the camera moves closer to Brody each time. That was great editing, and I guess we need to thank Verna Fields for that moment!

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Since she didn't have any usable footage of the shark, she went with the idea of making the shark menacing as she could, for as long as she could, without being able to show it.

 

Now that was some creative thinking that REALLY paid off to the benefit of the movie for sure.

 

I was 11 (going on 12) years old when this movie came out, and it was one of the first "grown up" monster movies I ever went to the theater to see. (and if my parents had ANY idea what we were going to watch... ha. I do not imagine they'd have EVER let us go)

 

It is STILL one of the most frightening films I can ever recall seeing. And it was SO scary the way the tension just built and built.. mainly because the monster was so "unseen" for much of the film. You only get glimpses of him here and there as he goes about causing all that mayhem. You just never knew for certain WHEN he'd pop up, but you knew he was coming... and that made him all the more frightening. (and then of course there was the MUSIC... don't even get me started on THAT. Did I mention how scary this movie is?? ha)

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she went with the idea of making the shark menacing as she could, for as long as she could, without being able to show it.

 

That choice is what made this movie what it is. To tell the story any other way would have killed it. I didn't know the name of the film editor, but we've seen the results of her work. The film is beautifully (and nerve wrackingly) edited.

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I agree she couldn't have done a better job if she tried. Jaws is one of those movies that, when I'm channel surfing and I land on it, I generally watch it until the end. I love Dreyfus in it, his exasperation with the mayor, and with the shark hunter (I can't think of his name right now).

 

To me the scariest scene is when Dreyfus and Scheider are on Dreyfus' boat while Dreyfus is diving and that head shows up -- screech - every time. I have yet to be disappointed by a Spielberg film.

*****

mrsl

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> {quote:title=mrsl wrote:}{quote}

> I agree she couldn't have done a better job if she tried. Jaws is one of those movies that, when I'm channel surfing and I land on it, I generally watch it until the end. I love Dreyfus in it, his exasperation with the mayor, and with the shark hunter (I can't think of his name right now).

>

> To me the scariest scene is when Dreyfus and Scheider are on Dreyfus' boat while Dreyfus is diving and that head shows up -- screech - every time. I have yet to be disappointed by a Spielberg film.

> *****

> mrsl

 

The boat captain was Quint played by Robert Shaw. My memory may be inaccurate but it seems to me that he died not too long after this film came out--maybe a couple of years. And he was fairly young.

 

Actually, Roy Scheider is who makes the film for me. It's definitely one of his best roles and made him a bigger star. I know he'd been the second lead in a few films before Jaws, most notably The French Connection, but this one made him an A list leading man for a few years.

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When ALL THAT JAZZ was in the planning stage, they considered dubbing the singing with another voice. Scheider said something like, "What? I did summer stock. We all did. I can sing and dance. I'm no Fred Astaire, but I'm up for the job."

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*'Jaws' took a bite out of movie history 35 years ago this week‎*

 

June 21, 2010

 

 

*Susan King covers classic Hollywood for the Hero Complex blog. Here, she dips a toe into the history of the first summer blockbuster, "Jaws," which was released 35 years ago this week.*

 

 

Duh-dum ... duh-dum ... Movie audiences didn?t know what hit them -- or bit them -- 35 years ago this week as ?Jaws? became the cinematic sensation of 1975. The lazy, hazy days of summer and summer movies would never be quite the same.

 

 

On June 20, 1975, Universal released the first true summer blockbuster, ?Jaws,? to 466 theaters across the country. Wide distribution of a film was practically unheard of in those days. Usually, a studio would release a film piecemeal, with limited engagements in the big cities before finally entering neighborhood theaters. Back in Los Angeles, for example, the old Cinerama Dome would have exclusive engagements of the biggest films.

 

 

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/herocomplex/2010/06/jaws-movie-35th-anniversary.html

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My Dad took my sister and I to see this film when we were kids (she was 9, I was 10). Shortly after viewing the film we went to Florida (we lived in Chicago) and I would NOT GO IN THE WATER for anything. Even a fresh water lake (Lake Michigan) spooked me.

 

SPOILERS:

 

The head popping out of the boat makes me jump when I see it today, but the most scary scene is the first kill right at the beginning of the movie.

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

.

>

> I was 11 (going on 12) years old when this movie came out, and it was one of the first "grown up" monster movies I ever went to the theater to see. (and if my parents had ANY idea what we were going to watch... ha. I do not imagine they'd have EVER let us go)

>

 

I was about that age too, but I wasn't allowed to see it! I was so mad! So I got a copy of the book and read it and was freaked out about water I couldn't see the bottom of (lakes, the ocean, really deep puddles, etc) for a couple of years. (Guess my parents were right about me not being old enough!)

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