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Why are we watching Clint Eastwood all day on Memorial Day??


PaulaJo
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> {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> Just a guess, but it's probably to recognize his heroic efforts as the military pilot who drops napalm on the title monster in Tarantula.

>

 

Nothing against Clint.

Hey, I'd be watching "Tarantula" if it was on today. But most of his stuff is just too new for me and not my style.

When it's Thelma Todd Day or

John Gilbert Day or

Joe E. Brown Day or

Basil Rathbone, Ann Sheridan, Norma Shearer, Bob Hope, Ethel Barrymore, Kathryn Grayson, Margaret O'Brien days (to pick a few from the August schedule)....the good OLD stuff, then I'll be watching.

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> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote}

> I'm not watching.

 

I don?t care much for him myself. I went to see two or three of his movies back in the ?70s, but there was nothing else to see in the ?70s. That was the worst movie decade of all time.

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I've been watching most of the day. Love seeing his films. I have no requirement for film age. A good movie is a good movie. Did you know that the opening segment of the musical number, Do Re MI, from the film, *The Sound of Music* (when the kids and Maria are having their mountainside picnic) and the film *Where Eagles Dare* were filmed at the same location? In fact, when Maria is sitting, playing the guitar, you can see the fortress,behind her. Of course, one was spring and one was winter.

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I thought it was refreshing to see "Nazty Nuisance," "The First Traveling Saleslady," "A Fistful of Dollars," "For A Few Dollars More," "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly," and "Hang 'Em High" on Memorial Day instead of the usual war and combat fare. It would have made my day if "Unforgiven" could have been scheduled for broadcast on Memorial Day.

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> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}

> I thought it was refreshing to see "Nazty Nuisance," "*The First Traveling Saleslady*," "A Fistful of Dollars," "For A Few Dollars More," "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly," and "Hang 'Em High" on Memorial Day instead of the usual war and combat fare. It would have made my day if "Unforgiven" could have been scheduled for broadcast on Memorial Day.

 

I hated the print of this film, completely washed out (that's okay though, I'm not petitioning for a restoration of it) but Carol and Clint? I had a good early morning "tee hee hee". Thanks TCM.

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> {quote:title=PaulaJo wrote:}{quote}

> *It's May 31 ^st^. Clint Eastwood's Birthday* *and* Memorial Day. What should we be scheduling on this day? *I just don't understand why we are watching Clint Eastwood movies today.*

 

I guess I don't understand your question? You already acknowledged above it was his birthday. As a matter of fact, it was his 80th. That's quite a landmark. It just happens that this year Memorial Day fell on the 31st, his birthday. Would you have preferred that TCM just throw in a few more random war movies on top of all those they showed all weekend instead of acknowledging Eastwood who had the misfortune to be born on a day that would also be Memorial Day 80 years after his birth?

 

Don't we say often enough that TCM should be holding special days for stars when they reach milestones in their life (such as Luise Rainer's 100th birthday), especially when they are still alive?

 

As to musicalnovelty who said the films were too new...weren't most of them from about 40+ years ago? Just how old does a film have to be to be on TCM? And, no offence meant, but looking at the list of days you prefer, I find it much easier to stomach a full day of Eastwood than seeing any film again with the too-cutesy Margaret O'Brien (even Meet Me in St. Louis), who to me is only s-l-i-g-h-t-l-y more bearable than Shirley Temple (but I wouldn't want to have to watch a match-off to see which would make me lose my lunch quicker).

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To see if he had fired five or six times, punk. I haven't seen Dirty Harry in a long

time, but it still holds up pretty well, though some of the shock value has worn off

after almost forty years. After Scorpio had been caught the first time and the DA

refused to press any charges, couldn't he have been charged with assault and battery

on Harry, and the attempted murder of his partner? All that could have been done

without any of the evidence Harry obtained illegally. Of course there goes much of

the plot.

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Going back to my law school days ( a long time ago), "fruit of the poisonous tree" casts a pretty broad net in the case of 4th Amendment violations. I think I agree, though, that he could have been charged with smaller crimes totally unrelated to the 4th Amendment violation.

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the ?70s. That was the worst movie decade of all time.

 

It certainly was different. But there were some fine movies in that time span. ANNIE HALL. DOG DAY AFTERNOON. JAWS. I would say the decade that just ended is the worst. There's rarely anything I even want to see.

 

Edited by: redriver on Jun 1, 2010 5:43 PM

to clean up some tech issues

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There are some film fans out there who believe the 70s was one of the best, most innovative periods for movies. A few years ago an interesting book about that very notion came out, " Easy Riders, Raging Bulls." I enjoyed it for all its inside information on filmmaking and Hollywood in the 1970s.

 

It always gets back to this, I guess: what one likes in a movie is a matter of personal taste. Many deplored the proliferation of "sex and violence " in 70s films, and there's no arguing that both did not become more frequent and more graphic. Still, so many great and interesting movies came out then, so many film directors acknowledged today to be iconoclasts of movie making - Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, Woody Allen, not to mention the more "mainstream" box office successes such as George Lucas and Steven Speilberg. These people may not be everyone's favourites, but they deserve their due as ground-breaking directors and men who truly loved movies themselves, both old and new.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 1, 2010 5:30 PM

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> {quote:title=redriver wrote:}{quote}

> the 70s. That was the worst movie decade of all time.

>

> It certainly was different. But there were some fine movies in that time span. ANNIE HALL. DOG DAY AFTERNOON. JAWS.

 

Wow, 3 memorable movies in 10 years! :)

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