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His Kind of Women is a great movie but is it a strange one. There are some very 'true' film noir scenes and dialog in the movie and the basic story of a man that gets into something he knows isn't good for him but where he has no other options is core to noir, but as you noted many of the scenes are camp or over the top comedy. The movie moves from a 'hard' scene (Mitch without a shirt being beaten with a belt sadist), to Price and a boat load of Mexican police sinking while Price gives of Shakespear! Now that is camp!

 

A must see for any movie fan but it is good to warn people that the movies is strange and to expect the unexpected.

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Hi kids, this is your good old Hollywood buddy Bob Mitchum. How are all you

straight shooters doing today? Good. Hey kids, recently I got into a bit of a fix,

through no fault of my own, but you know how that works, the cookie jar type

of stuff. Anyway, I'd just like to pass along one little bit of advice. See the photo

of this funny looking cigarette? Okay, now partners, if you should happen to see

anyone smoking one of these, report them to the police pronto, because that's a

definite no no. I know you're not supposed to tell on people, but if you found out

your pal was a commie, wouldn't you report them? Sure. Well these cigarettes are

about three times as bad as that. Just tell the nice folks down at the station that

Bob sent you. That would sure help with my parole, but that's another story. Okay

kids, back to play. Say, one more thing. If daddy happens to be on a long trip,

leave the back door open okay? That will be our little secret. See ya around.

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Good points, jamesjazzguitar.

 

My favorite line from *His Kind of Woman* is the moment Mitchum snaps back at Russell after one of her gripes:

 

"If you did a little sewing with that needle, you'd be a much happier woman." :)

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fredbaetz,

 

Mitchum is wonderful in "GI Joe." Also in EL DORADO. Two of his better efforts.

 

Miss Wonderly,

 

My favorites have already been discussed. OUT OF THE PAST, the textbook for film noir, and the flawless, scintillating CAPE FEAR. For direct, unadulterated thrills, you can't beat this nail-biting classic. I also like WHERE DANGER LIVES and the Laughton film.

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*Out of the Past* is one of my favorites, too.

 

But my #1 favorite is *Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison*. I first saw that film with my mom on

television when I was three or four.

 

My favorite scene as a child: catching the turtle

 

My favorite scene as an adult: sneaking into the Japanese camp for supplies

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Believe it or not, I've never seen either *Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison* or *G.I.Joe*. I know, I know, and I call myself a Robert Mitchum fan. I don't know how this has happened, I've no excuse. Both these movies are shown fairly often on TCM and are available on dvd. I've just never gotten around to them yet. Hey, this way I have something in the Mitchum universe to look forward to.

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Thank you, finance. I love this film. :)

 

Both "Old Droopy Eyes" and Deborah Kerr make this film a total tour de force. Two people carry this courageous story and make it riveting. Human foibles, the Japanese army, and forces of nature interact with only two people.

 

Miss W., iff you've never seen it, you are missing out on one of the classics.

 

*GI Joe* is also a great film to watch, and see Mitchum's breakthrough role. But for me, he is never more poignant, revelatory, or a team player than he is in *Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison.*

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What about *Father Goose*? It's pretty much only Cary Grant and Lesley Caron. And all those kids. Oh, I guess it doesn't count. There's also those navy officials at the beginning.

 

Maybe the reason why I haven't watched *Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison* is because, it's so available, I figure there's not rush. Aargh, that sounds pretty lame, doesn't it. Well, dammit, I'm going to check it out within the week. My local movie rental place has it. Plus, I like Deborah Kerr.

 

ps -finance, the Black Hawks have the Flyers on the run. I hope there's no rioting .

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 7, 2010 3:25 PM

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> The only other two-person film I can think of offhand is SLEUTH. Any others?

 

 

*My Dinner With Andre*, and Spalding Gray made several fine one-man films. I know there are others.

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misswonderly wondered:

*Was Jim Dougherty a baseball player? (if so, that's two M.M. was married to)*

 

Was Jim Dougherty a playwright? (if so, that's two M.M. was married to). j/k :-)

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Don't think the following were mentioned. Are among my favorite Mitchum films (among so many), not least because of the co-stars:

 

The Lusty Men and White Witch Doctor, both with zesty Susan Hayward.

Second Chance, with my favorite Linda Darnell

Fire Down Below, with another favorite redhead, Rita Hayworth

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Duh - I feel a bit silly, I must admit I've never heard of either Jim Dougherty. I did "google" the name, and came up with two Wikipedia entries. One for the playwright, who , as finance informed us, worked with Robert Mitchum in a munitions plant, and who was Marilyn Monroe's first husband.

The other entry was about a Jim Dougherty who actually is a baseball player. Clearly I didn't spend a lot of time checking this stuff out!

(At least I can name the other playwright she was married to -Arthur Miller. Didn't look it up on Wikipedia, neither. :) )

 

While on the subject of Marilyn Monroe, of course there's the film *River of No Return*, in which she co-starred with...Robert Mitchum! I saw this only once, and it was so long ago, I don't remember it that well. All I can recall is that there was a kid in it, and that the Mitchum character was somewhat contemptuous of her for a good part of the movie. I'd like to see it again.

 

 

I like *The Lusty Men*, not only for Mitch's performance, but also Susan Hayward's and Arthur Kennedy's. (who always reminds me a little of Van Heflin.)

 

My lack of real movie chops is really showing up this week; the other films you mentioned, I've never even heard of ! Oh well, that's one of the good thing about these boards - you learn stuff.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 8, 2010 5:26 PM for typos and spellos.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 8, 2010 5:27 PM

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misswonderly wrote:

*Duh - I feel a bit silly, I must admit I've never heard of either Jim Dougherty. I did "google" the name, and came up with two Wikipedia entries. One for the playwright, who , as finance informed us, worked with Robert Mitchum in a munitions plant, and who was Marilyn Monroe's first husband.*

 

I was actually being facetious with my post, since I thought you were kidding about MM's first husband being a baseball player (like Joe DiMaggio, husband No.2), I just said he must be a playwright (like Arthur Miller, husband No.3).

 

As for the Mitchum movies I mentioned:

 

White Witch Doctor (20th Century Fox-1953) costarred Susan Hayward. It was one of a slew of early 50s movies that tried to recreate the formula of The African Queen (or was it the 1950 remake of King Solomon's Mines), i.e. white people as saviors in Africa, finding adventure and romance; others of this ilk include The Snows Of Kilimanjaro and Mogambo. White Witch Doctor had been initially announced to star Anne Baxter, but with Susan Hayward the biggest star on the lot by 1952, and fresh from the chemistry with Mitchum on loan to RKO, Fox decided to star her and reteam them. It was the last 20th production not filmed in Cinemascope, although i believe some testing of the widescreen process was done on this film.

 

Second Chance (RKO-1953) costarred Linda Darnell. Gangster's moll hides out in South America (actually Taxco, Guerrero, M?xico) from both the mob and the government (so as not to have to testify about her mobster boyfriend), meets boxer with a past Mitchum (he killed a fellow boxer in the ring). Interestingly, it had been planned for Jane Russell, but Mitchum decided he was no longer going along with Hughes' plans to turn the pair (Russell/Mitchum) into a Bogart/Bacall, and Russell was unavailable completing Gentlemen Prefer Blondes at Fox. Next, Susan Hayward was to have done it, but walked out because she didn't like the costumes. Darnell, now free-lancing after many years at Fox, replaced her at the last minute. Hughes had planned this thriller to be shot in 3-D, and a voluptuous female star was to provide another (two other) 3-d thrill. But Linda was feeling overweight, and so spent most of the movie in a two-piece suit, thereby foiling Hughes' plans of thrilling audiences with her 3-D assets. The film is notable for its suspenseful cable-car climax, with menacing mob muscle Jack Palance confronting Darnell and Mitchum.

 

Fire Down Below (Columbia-1957) costarred Rita Hayworth. It was filmed in the Caribbean, and had Rita's studio again hoping for boxoffice magic with another variation of her Gilda character. Mitchum has to transport her and Jack Lemmon, both competing for her favor. Flavorful actioner with calypso music.

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Arturo, as a Mitchum fan, I have seen, and like all of those. It has been years since I saw *White Witch Doctor*, and I wouldn't mind seeing it again. There is a Mitchum movie I don't think I've seen since the late 60s, *Mister Moses*, which, as a teenager, I loved back then, but it doesn't ever seem to be shown, and it's not on DVD.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> There is a Mitchum movie I don't think I've seen since the late 60s, *Mister Moses*, which, as a teenager, I loved back then, but it doesn't ever seem to be shown, and it's not on DVD.

 

I remember that one. I think it premiered on NBC in the sixties; haven't seen it since. Carroll Baker was in it, and Raymond St. Jacques played kind of a "hip" native.

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As I recall, he pretended to be a witch doctor, but was really a revolutionary, and Mitchum eventually recruited him to help with the mission, but I think that's the last time I saw it too, so my memory might not be entirely accurate.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Jun 8, 2010 8:01 PM

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That sounds about right. I just remember him saying lines to Mitchum like "you really blew it, Big Daddy," or something like that. Odd film, but I do remember liking it.

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