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In Cold Blood (1967)


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What do you mean, "come true"? The film was based on a true crime event which Truman Capote wrote about in a more or less fictional form. The events he describes in his book certainly were based on an actual murder, a kind of home invasion that occurred - I'd have to look it up, but I'm guessing the late 50s. This was a very famous crime and the trial that followed equally so. There is not only the original In Cold Blood movie, 1967, but also a television mini- series. 1996, plus two quite recent films about Truman Capote and his investigation of the murders, Capote (2005), and Infamous (2006).

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 12, 2010 1:12 PM

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 12, 2010 1:13 PM

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People swear by this book. I haven't read it, but I'm told it's exceptionally well written. I guess I'm put off by the subject matter; not exactly beach reading. But someday I'll take a crack at it. I like the movie. Like CAPOTE. The book has got to be next.

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It is a very well written book, but not a difficult one, and is relatively short. I think

there is an ongoing debate about what details Capote made up and what is fact,

but that doesn't have an impact on the general tone of the book. Perry and Dick

have to be two of the creepiest "characters" to appear in a movie. Many movie villains

are a bit on the fantastic side, but these two could be walking around unnoticed

anywhere. And they probably are.

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*The film was based on a true crime event which Truman Capote wrote about in a more or less fictional form.*

 

MsW,

 

The book by Truman Capote is a work of non-fiction. He didn't fictionalize the story. What made the book a best seller and made Capote's reputation as an author is that it was one of the first narrative non-fiction books about a sensational crime instead of the usual "just the facts" type that had become the standard.

 

Capote's approach to the story catapulted him to the ranks of best-selling authors and introduced a genre that today is the standard.

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lzcutter: I should have been more careful in my wording of my description of the book ("In Cold Blood")

 

I'm very much aware that it is an actual "true crime" account of a "home invasion" type murder of the Clutter family. When I used to work in a book store, it was always shelved in the "true crime" section, not fiction. What I meant was, the way it is written, it reads almost like fiction, as opposed to the more documentary like traditional non-fiction style of writing usually employed in books written about true crime events.

Capote, as most people involved with these boards know, of course was the creator of Breakfast at Tiffany's along with a number of other works of fiction. I've always been under the impression that the way he wrote In Cold Blood was considered innovative, even controversial, because of the fiction like style he used .

 

(Yes, he was friends with Harper Lee, some think the character of Dell in To Kill a Mockingbird is based on Truman Capote, but he was a good writer in his own right, and he probably wrote In Cold Blood pretty much on his own. At least, "in my humble opinion.")

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Lee's assistance on In Cold Blood is fact, not conjecture. How much she did is what is debated. However, Capote's own notes indicate she provided quite a bit of help, and he provided no help to her on To Kill a Mockingbird, as many assumed. She, of course, has remained mute, as usual.

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The young boy's name in "Mockingbird" is "Dill" not Dell. I do that all the time when I'm typing. She use to call him her "Pocket Merlin" for his creative and inventive ways of doing things....

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"Dill", right, not "Dell". I have a masochistic tendency to admit when I'm wrong, even when I'm given an "out" (like a typo). But I just had the name wrong, I"m afraid it wasn't a typo. I should have remembered, because the first time I read To Kill a Mockingbird I kept thinking about pickles whenever Dill's name came up.

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> {quote:title=johnm_001 wrote:}{quote}

> Lee's assistance on In Cold Blood is fact, not conjecture. How much she did is what is debated. However, Capote's own notes indicate she provided quite a bit of help, and he provided no help to her on To Kill a Mockingbird, as many assumed. She, of course, has remained mute, as usual.

 

For those interested in this topic, I'll suggest the book "Mockingbird - A Portrait of Harper Lee" by Charles J. Shields which was published in 2006. It's a fascinating look into her life including her relationship with Capote, over the years, and her assistance with his writing "In Cold Blood".

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I just noticed an interesting thing while having *In Cold Blood* on in the background. Robert Blake is asking his partner if he remembered Bogie in *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre*, and then talked about going to Mexico to find gold.

 

It struck me because Robert Blake was the little kid in *Treasure* that sold Fred C. Dobbs the winning lottery ticket. I just never noticed it before.

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The movie just went off on TCM a little while ago. My favorite part is when I think it was Blake's character was talking in front of a window and it's raining, and the light from outside makes it look as if water is running down his face. I think it's supposed to suggest that he wants to cry, or on the inside, he is crying. This technique has been imitated since the release of In Cold Blood....

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In the great documentary on cinematography "Visions of Light" they show this scene, and the late, great Conrad Hall says that the rain reflecting on Blake's face was a happy accident, that they didn't plan on the streaking of water on his face that way. But it is amazing....

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Just watched 1969's "Midnight Cowboy" with the accompanying commentary. During the final scene on the bus with Hoffman and Voight, it started to rain on the windows, similar to the effect evidenced in "In Cold Blood". The cameraman, unfortunately (or fortunately) stopped filming and the rain quit.

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cinemafan wrote:

<< It struck me because Robert Blake was the little kid in Treasure that sold Fred C. Dobbs the winning lottery ticket. I just never noticed it before. >>

 

Robert Blake is probually the reason Fred C. Dobbs protects his goods :)

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I don't know how old any of you are but I was about thirteen when all this happened. It was only a year after the Starkweather/Fugate crime spree (a teen-age boy and girl killed 12 people in 3 western states-including her parents and baby sister) and it scared us kids witless. What was happening to our country? Could this happen to us? Could some of our friends-or us-go crazy like this? Didn't this just happen in old Western movies?

 

As both cases played out and the murderers were executed (3 out of 4, they spared the girl) we seemed to lose a sense of safety. The rest of the 60's took care of what was left. Ten years after this came Tate-LaBianca.

 

I read the book and watched this movie before. I couldn't again as it seem so real that other time I kept looking away. I hate to admit it but perhaps Robert Blake's playing one of the killers had something to do with it. I've always liked his work and he and I want to believe his jury was right as I'm certain others do. Mixing reel and real life isn't right or fair but I know it's out there. This takes away from the remaining Clutter family members and friends who lost them is such a horrible manner and miss them. The story is really about what happened to them for no reason, the man-hours and work taken to bring the killers in, and that they paid for it. Maybe I need to see this again in spite of my misgivings.

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In "Treasure of the Sierra Madre", Robert Blake was the boy who sold the lottery ticket that enabled

them to prospect for gold in Mexico. In "In Cold Blood" Blake's character goes to Mexico, has a treasure map and talks about finding lost gold in the Yucatan region!

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redriver, *Badlands* is truly one of my favourite movies of all time. Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek are

both unforgettable in it. I love one of Sissy's opening lines (I should have saved this for the "Favourite Lines" thread.)

"He was rale hayndsome. Wha, he was almost as hayndsome as James Dean". Not sure that's 100% the wording, but close. I always enjoy quoting that line, complete with Sissy's accent.

 

I'm not sure why I don't find *Badlands* one of those desolate films I can't bear to watch a second time, like the others we're talking about here. Horrible things happen in it, it's based on an actual killing spree.Maybe it's Sissy's accent. Or the Carl Orff soundtrack. Or maybe it's just because it's so damn good.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 17, 2010 9:03 PM ! I think I might have gotten this thread mixed up with the 10 Rillington Place thread, which explains my references to other "disturbing" films.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 17, 2010 9:55 PM

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