Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


Recommended Posts

The five movies I saw this week were much more enjoyable. Admittedly A Summer Place was as underwhelming as I expected (sentimental ending, underwhelming teen actors, complete lack of insight, non adulterous parents so horrible that one wonders how they ever got married). And the music theme is ripe for parody (Jasper on The Simpsons singing "This is the theme/from A Summer Place being my favorite). By contrast, The Grand Budapest Hotel is as witty and charming as the trailer suggests, and Ralph Fiennes gives a great comic performance. (And it begs the question of how it could possible lose the Oscar for set decoration.) The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug could be trimmed by twenty minutes, and people who read the novel may wonder why it is being turned into eight hours of movies. But I find it pretty fun and exciting, full of nice art direction. I'm not the biggest James Whale fan, but The Old Dark House is by no mean a bad movie, and it has Charles Laughton and Melvyn Douglas! Finally Le Joli Mai is a fine documentary about Paris in May 1962. Chris Marker shows how it's done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Admittedly A Summer Place was as underwhelming as I expected (sentimental ending, underwhelming teen actors, complete lack of insight, non adulterous parents so horrible that one wonders how they ever got married). And the music theme is ripe for parody (Jasper on The Simpsons singing "This is the theme/from A Summer Place being my favorite).

 

I enjoy "A Summer Place." While it isn't a cinematic masterpiece by any means and I'm in agreement that the two non-adulterous parents are horrible people, I still enjoy the movie. I like the theme, even if it's schmaltzy. Though when I first saw the movie, I recognized the song from "Animal House." I now know that this is the movie the song came from. I liked the theme of love that was present in the film and I liked how the relationship of the adulterous couple mirrored that of the young teenage couple, save for the teenage pregnancy.

 

I think the horrible non-adulterous parents were supposed to give the audience some sympathy for the other halves of those couples to cheat on their respective spouses and rekindle their romance. Sandra Dee's mother in that film I absolutely despised. What a horrible, vile woman. When her husband finally told her off I was cheering for him. The alcoholic husband was more pathetic than anything. I was happy that their mates were able to dump them and be happy.

 

While I agree that "A Summer Place" is over-wrought with cheesy sentiment and is overly dramatic at times, I still find it enjoyable. Maybe I have a higher "cheese tolerance" than others?

 

P.S. I love when Jasper sings about "A Summer Place" !

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I saw only three movies over the last two weeks.  The Disorderly Orderly is rather ordinary Lewis shtick:  an infinitely irritating incompetent is manipulatively redeemed by some crude sentimenality.  Tangled isn't a bad movie, but it's totally without genius.  Tabu is a very striking movie visually, and I would have liked it much more if the subtitles could be read easier over the black and white backgrounds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen quite a few films in the past few days that I'd never seen before. 

 

Laura, I've heard much about this film; but had never seen it.  I believe that it was on Netflix Instant Streaming for the longest time.  TCM premiered it for the first time last night as the first installment of their "Essentials" series.  After having watched it, I'm sorry that I didn't watch it on Netflix when it was on.  I had heard much about Gene Tierney, but had never seen her in a film.  I'm happy to say that I've now seen her in two films.  I also enjoyed Dana Andrews very much.  Tierney and Andrews made a great screen team.  I absolutely loved Laura, great cast and plot.  Otto Preminger did a fantastic job.  I look forward to acquiring this film and adding it to my vast movie collection.   

 

Where the Sidewalk Ends, this film aired right after Laura.  Being a sucker for a great film noir, I watched this film as well.  I think this film was also on the Netflix Instant Streaming for awhile; but again, I never watched it.  Again, Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews were a great team, even if Tierney was in a more peripheral role.  I loved Dana Andrews' character and it was interesting to see if he'd finally come clean.  He was in an interesting situation for awhile when he was helping (not directly, but he wasn't preventing it) Gene Tierney's dad go to jail for a crime Andrews committed, while at the same time romancing Tierney who was married to the man that Andrews killed.  This was another great film noir with a wonderful cast.   

 

Cheaper By the Dozen, this film is currently on the Netflix Instant Streaming.  This is the original version of the film, starring Clifton Webb, Myrna Loy and Jeanne Crain.  I had never seen Jeanne Crain in a film, so this was my introduction to her.  While I enjoyed her character, I felt she was too old for the part.  I didn't buy her as a 17-year old.  Aside from Webb and Loy, I was able to identify some of the other supporting actors.  Betty Lynn, better known as Thelma Lou, Barney Fife's girlfriend on The Andy Griffith Show, played one of Jeanne Crain's classmates.  Patti Brady, who played the Gilbreth daughter who was always dieting, played Errol Flynn's daughter in Never Say Goodbye, and Edgar Buchanan, better known as Uncle Joe on Petticoat Junction, was the doctor.  Finally, Barbara Bates, who played the second eldest daughter, was Phoebe in All About Eve.  All in all, this was an enjoyable film.  I especially enjoyed the two eldest daughters bobbing their hair like the their female peers, against their Dad's wishes.  I also enjoyed the kids staging a meeting and basically outvoting their Dad into getting a dog.  Myrna Loy's role was interesting as well.  I think this is the first movie I've seen her in where she hasn't been in a romantic part.  That woman had amazing genes, this film came out about 16 years after The Thin Man and she looked exactly the same. 

 

I'll probably have more reviews in awhile, I've been trying to catch up on my DVR so I can erase things and make room for new stuff!

 

Right now I'm watching Uncertain Glory with Mr. Flynn.  He's looking as dreamy as always.  ::Sigh::

 

P.S. Wow, apparently q u e u e is a naughty word.  I had to replace it with "Streaming."  I must not be up on my slang, because I don't even know how that word could be misconstrued into something dirty and or offensive. 

Edited by speedracer5
Link to post
Share on other sites

markbeckuaf!!!!!!!! Did you see it? Starting off the round of mediocre Westerns today?

 

Best movie I've seen in years. Tiny little movie that should have earned Oscars across the board.

 

Outstanding, it had it all. Aline MacMahon blew me away, and the rest of the cast shone as well.

 

The ending was perfect, I was worried there for a moment.

 

DID YOU SEE IT? I HOPE YOU SAW IT!!!!!!!!! :)

 

Oh, the name?

 

The Life Of Jimmy Dolan.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ErrolFlynn's Girlfriend, you may have a significant rival, as you can see from my photo.  Anyway, glad to hear you are discovering the gorgeous and talented Flynn.  I have to admit The Adventures of Robin Hood is probably my favorite film, and I go into a funk if I don't see it 2 or 3 times a year.  Captain Blood is another favorite of mine, perhaps also because of the presence of Basil Rathbone, who has his own kind of sexy going on. 

 

I usually watch mostly TCM, but saw a few things On Demand last week because my sister was visting.

 

Like a another poster, I found Captain Philips very disappointing and actually fell asleep at one point.  I thought Tom Hanks was excellent, but found the movie overlong.  We all knew where it was going, and it took too long to get there.

 

I was surprised by The BookThief, which got mediocre reviews.  I watched it with my sister, and we were both moved to tears.  All the performances were excellent, especially Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson. 

 

I saw The Grand Budapest Hotel last week-end in the theater.  It's really a visually delightful, funny, and surprising movie.  I also would like to get the score on CD.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In reverse order in which they were shown,  I'd go with Spione, Laura, and for something completely different, The Sin of Madelon Claudet.  I'd throw in Baby Face if it hadn't been aired about half a dozen times a year, whereas the other three don't show up nearly as often.

 

And if I had to choose one, Fritz Lang's Spione (Spies) would win out.  Fans of his two early Dr. Mabuse films would love it.  The Weimar era films of Germany may well be the best set of movies ever made, and this is one of the best of that group.

 

As for the worst, I'll leave that blank.  After just seeing John Wayne in a movie (The Big Trail) that I actually liked, I feel in too good a mood to go negative unless someone mentions The Graduate. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen quite a few films in the past few days that I'd never seen before. 

 

Laura, I've heard much about this film; but had never seen it.  I believe that it was on Netflix Instant Streaming for the longest time.  TCM premiered it for the first time last night as the first installment of their "Essentials" series.  After having watched it, I'm sorry that I didn't watch it on Netflix when it was on.  I had heard much about Gene Tierney, but had never seen her in a film.  I'm happy to say that I've now seen her in two films.  I also enjoyed Dana Andrews very much.  Tierney and Andrews made a great screen team.  I absolutely loved Laura, great cast and plot.  Otto Preminger did a fantastic job.  I look forward to acquiring this film and adding it to my vast movie collection.   

 

Where the Sidewalk Ends, this film aired right after Laura.  Being a sucker for a great film noir, I watched this film as well.  I think this film was also on the Netflix Instant Streaming for awhile; but again, I never watched it.  Again, Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews were a great team, even if Tierney was in a more peripheral role.  I loved Dana Andrews' character and it was interesting to see if he'd finally come clean.  He was in an interesting situation for awhile when he was helping (not directly, but he wasn't preventing it) Gene Tierney's dad go to jail for a crime Andrews committed, while at the same time romancing Tierney who was married to the man that Andrews killed.  This was another great film noir with a wonderful cast.   

 

 

speedracer5, you should also check out Gene Tierney in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN. It is a film nor inTechnicolor, but it works largely due to Gene Tierney's performance.  There is a very memorable scene with Darryl Hickman swimming and Gene Tierney in sunglasses in a row boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most favorite: SPIONE, a very rapid fire silent movie that confused me at times (I am easily  confused) as to what was going on but certainly was the highlight of my week.  I need to see it again so I can put some of the rapid fire scenes together in my withering mind.  Love the German silent cinema!!  "Haghi" the criminal mastermind seemed like a blend of Dr. Strangelove and Lenin/Trotsky as a personality and screen persona.  Excellent movie that I hope to see again so I can pick out more of the nuances.

 

Least favorite:  All the ancient John Wayne flics from the early 30's.  I know that it is very important and worthwhile for TCM to show them and I complement them for showing them but they bore me terrifically and I've just watched bits and pieces of them.  Can't view more.  Wasn't John Wayne a great physical specimen in his youth though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't John Wayne a great physical specimen in his youth though.

 

That he was, but he was one of the worst actors ever. As I said, Room 101.

 

Did you catch his brief appearance in The Life Of Jimmy Dolan, where better actors astonished and amazed? Aline MacMahon wrestling with her scarf was priceless.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't John Wayne a great physical specimen in his youth though.

 

That he was, but he was one of the worst actors ever. As I said, Room 101.

 

Did you catch his brief appearance in The Life Of Jimmy Dolan, where better actors astonished and amazed? Aline MacMahon wrestling with her scarf was priceless.

Yea, I never thought Wayne was much of an actor but he was exceptional in a few such as The Searchers and Red River.  I did not catch The Life of Jimmy Dolan.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it this week or last...I always record...but really liked "The Good Earth" which I had never seen before.  I read the book eons ago and loved it, but never sought out the movie.  The special effects/production was really impressive, this being in 1937..and, mesmerized by Luise Rainier's performance (who I had never seen before), there was a lot going on in her eyes.  

 

I happened to catch a flash of John Wayne in one of the very early films and I did go, "whoa"...he was quite handsome with a great smile.  I only think of him as craggy faced, gruff voiced, Rooster Cogburn-like so it was a surprise. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

ErrolFlynn's Girlfriend, you may have a significant rival, as you can see from my photo.  Anyway, glad to hear you are discovering the gorgeous and talented Flynn.  I have to admit The Adventures of Robin Hood is probably my favorite film, and I go into a funk if I don't see it 2 or 3 times a year.  Captain Blood is another favorite of mine, perhaps also because of the presence of Basil Rathbone, who has his own kind of sexy going on. 

 

 

I'll admit that I watch his movies often.  Lol.  Can't get enough.  I enjoy "Captain Blood" as well.  Except I don't find him nearly as dreamy in that film as I do in "The Sisters" and "Gentleman Jim."  I think it's the wig.  I believe he also has his original teeth in that film as well.  In "Captain Blood," I find him the dreamiest during the slave purchasing scene.  Olivia got him for a bargain.  For 10 pounds, I'd buy him too.  In "The Adventures of Robin Hood," I think the wig somewhat undermines his dreaminess again, but you can't say that the man doesn't wear tights well.  In that film, I think he's at his most attractive when he's "The Tall Tinker," probably because the wig is hidden. 

 

My constant swooning aside, I think Errol Flynn is very underrated as an actor.  I believe that's most likely due to the fact that his most popular films were his swashbucklers and westerns-- which typically aren't seen as "serious" fare.  During Bette Davis' interview with Dick Cavett, she stated that even Errol said he didn't know anything about acting and that she agreed with him.  She said he was one of the "personality" actors, but she talked about him in the most complimentary way.  I especially love his war films, he was just as adept at a serious war film as he was comedy.  I especially enjoyed "The Dawn Patrol."  Even in lighter fare, like "Four's a Crowd" and even in some of his standard Errol Flynn roles, he showed a gift of comedy and it is too bad he wasn't given more opportunities to explore that genre. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I happened to catch a flash of John Wayne in one of the very early films and I did go, "whoa"...he was quite handsome with a great smile.  I only think of him as craggy faced, gruff voiced, Rooster Cogburn-like so it was a surprise. 

swimminginaqua, you should try to catch Stagecoach. Not only was Wayne lovely to look at, but his acting wasn't half bad.

 

I have no idea what happened to him. :o

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Speedracer5, I fell for Errol as Robin Hood at age 10, and still haven't gotten over him.  At that age, the wig didn't bother me.  It was the late 60s when I first saw him on some late show, and all the cute guys had long hair back then.   He is excellent in Dawn Patrol and They Died with Their Boots On.  The farewell scene in Boots always makes me tear up.   I feel that he was a truly underrated talent.  He's a great Robin Hood not only because he is handsome and charming, but you believe all that stuff he says about fighting for injustice. 

 

If you like him dancing a jig, you should catch him in the pub number in Thank Your Lucky Stars.  The movie itself can be tiresome, but it's worth watching for that number and for Bette Davis singing They're Either Too Young or Too Old.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Speedracer5, I fell for Errol as Robin Hood at age 10, and still haven't gotten over him.  At that age, the wig didn't bother me.  It was the late 60s when I first saw him on some late show, and all the cute guys had long hair back then.   He is excellent in Dawn Patrol and They Died with Their Boots On.  The farewell scene in Boots always makes me tear up.   I feel that he was a truly underrated talent.  He's a great Robin Hood not only because he is handsome and charming, but you believe all that stuff he says about fighting for injustice. 

 

If you like him dancing a jig, you should catch him in the pub number in Thank Your Lucky Stars.  The movie itself can be tiresome, but it's worth watching for that number and for Bette Davis singing They're Either Too Young or Too Old.

I have watched him dance and sing in the pub number in "Thank Your Lucky Stars."  It is on You Tube, I've watched it way too many times.  Haha.  It's airing on TCM next month, I'll record it then so that I can see all the other performances.  "Thank Your Lucky Stars" is also part of a new TCM Greatest Classics collection-- "Wartime Musicals."  I might get it just for this film and "Hollywood Canteen."

 

Strangely enough, while I had heard of Errol Flynn, for whatever reason, I had never seen any of his films, until last October when an old theater in town was showing "The Adventures of Robin Hood."  I didn't even know what Flynn looked like, let alone seen him in any film.  After 'Robin Hood,' I was hooked.  What had I been doing with my life? After that, I perused Netflix and got "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex" (while not the best film ever, I enjoyed it and Errol was as beautiful as ever) and then got "Captain Blood."  By then, the holiday season had rolled around and I asked for the Errol Flynn signature collection volume 1, which I got.  I then happened to come across copies of 'Robin Hood' on Blu-Ray and the Errol Flynn Adventures collection for 50% off, so of course, I had to get those.  Around the holiday season, I also discovered the Warner Brothers Archive website and procured 5 more Flynn films and somewhere along the line I also got the Errol Flynn Westerns collection.  I may have also bootlegged a couple films as well.  My birthday is coming up in a couple months, it'll be the perfect time to request the Errol Flynn Signature Collection Vol 2.  In that time, I also read his autobiography and Buster Wiles' autobiography, "My Days with Errol Flynn."  As you can see, my obsession with him has become quite fierce in such a short amount of time.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it will be Saturday before I watch TCM this week. Can't stand JW. I do not see why he is such an icon. Terrible actor, right up there with Burt Reynolds. 

You said it, rickzupp. Never realized how much I miss finding at least ONE good classically classic black and white movie on TCM until this week, when there is only garbage on for ........ how many straight days?

 

Wow. :(     :angry:     :huh:     :o    :unsure:    :wacko:     :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I saw six movies this week, all with their own virtues, but none of them fully successful.  Mary Reilly is a revisionist take on the Jekyll/Hyde story, and it's better than Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, but not as good as Bram Stoker's Dracula.  it's possible the reason the story has never been successfully filmed is because Robert Louis Stevenson didn't have a profound take on the idea (be moderate and avoid extremes).  The story appears to be more profound than it actually is (while the best vampire movies allude to other things sexual desire, aristocracy, the weight of history, as well as a whole cinematic history of artifice).  Or it may be because it's never really attracted first rate talent.  The World's End is amusing and has some good lines, though one expects perhaps a bit more than don't be an alcoholic.  The 21 century version of Peter Pan has its charms, and I finally saw The Clash of the Titans, which at the time its special effects appeared dated, but could still be enjoyed on its own terms.  Deserter is an interesting Soviet film, though it's more interesting because of its technique, which is less interesting than Eisenstein, or it content which is hardly profound.  And finally there's Stories we Tell:  if you ever wanted to see Mamma Mia without ABBA songs, and presented as an earnest Canadian documentary, this is the movie for you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

...and I finally saw The Clash of the Titans, which at the time its special effects appeared dated, but could still be enjoyed on its own terms.

 

I thought the special effects were particularly entertaining, partly due to what I believe you correctly term "dated." It was not over-the-top and obvious with respect to CGI and therefore appeared more real to me. This isn't my usual fare and I'm not sure how I came to even try it, but I enjoyed it quite a lot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've watched quite a few things this week:

 

I found a documentary on Netflix Instant called: "These Amazing Shadows: The Movies That Make America."  It was a documentary about the National Film Registry and their efforts to preserve American cinema.  It was very interesting.  It covered everything from the actual act of preserving the film, to where the nitrate films are stored and the process they go through to name films to the registry.  The special started with Ted Turner's attempts to colorize the classics in the 1980s when he had purchased the library.  They showed an old news clip of him saying something to the effect of: "They're my films now, I can do what I want with them."  Ooh that got my blood boiling.  I'm glad that the expense of colorizing the films led him to abandon the idea.  

 

I also finally watched the conclusion of the MGM documentary.  This is probably one of the best documentaries I've ever seen.  Patrick Stewart is a great narrator and it was fun seeing all the interviews (whether they were current or archive footage) with classic MGM stars.  That was a wild set they built for Patrick Stewart.  MGM truly made some great films and I'm glad that they're still around today.  The fall of the studio was tragic; but for me, the most tragic part of the whole documentary was seeing the footage of them destroying the back lot in the 1970s.  

 

I also watched "The Catered Affair" with Bette Davis, Ernest Borgnine, Debbie Reynolds, Barry Fitzgerald and Rod Taylor.  This was a great film.  It was interesting seeing Reynolds in a role outside of the cute, bubbly ingenue character.  Davis and Borgnine were fantastic as was Fitzgerald who I didn't realize had been in a few other films I had seen like "Bringing Up Baby" and "The Dawn Patrol."  I related to the plights of the three main characters: Davis, Borgnine and Reynolds.  Wedding planning is the absolute worst.  When I was going through the horror that is wedding planning, I felt like the Debbie Reynolds character: what I wanted and envisioned was different than what my mom envisioned.  However, like Bette Davis, I wanted to have an event that was special and a celebration with friends and family.  Except, unlike Davis, I didn't want my parents spending their life savings on it.  Those weddings that cost tens of thousands of dollars are absolutely ridiculous in my opinion.  Use the money for a downpayment for a home and an awesome honeymoon.  Finally, like Ernest Borgnine, when you're going through buying the flowers, cake, dress, venue deposit, etc. you just watch the money fly out the window and repeatedly refuse stupid add on things that no one needs.  Do people really care that you have chair covers? No.  

 

After reading the "What are you reading?" thread, TikiSoo mentioned a book covering the studio system that sounded very interesting.  I'm happy to report that after looking up the exact title on my reading social networking site, GoodReads, I searched for it on my library's website and was happy to find out that they have it! I'll get that next when I finally finish "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and my Orson Welles biography that I got.  

 

Up next on my DVR:

 

Lonelyhearts

Too Many Husbands

A Face in the Crowd

The Best Years of Our Lives

On the Waterfront

Raintree County

Test Pilot

Link to post
Share on other sites

Best part of The Unholy Night - the opening, with the ghostly sheet draped skull, hung from a tree, moving in the breeze. Would have been dynamite in True Detective.

 

Silly little movie, with Roland Young the only decent actor. Man, can Karloff chew that scenery and spit it out whole. Poor Lugosi, he never stood a chance, as wonderful as he was in Dracula.

 

No matter, it marks the end of The Week Of The Wooden Actor, aka John Wayne. Thanks, TCM, looks to be a fairly crackerjack day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The fall of the studio was tragic; but for me, the most tragic part of the whole documentary was seeing the footage of them destroying the back lot in the 1970s.

 

 

I finally finished the MGM documentary this week, too (although I had seen it before many years ago), and I found myself a bit depressed at the end, especially over the destruction of the backlot.

 

I'm curious to hear what you think of Lonelyhearts when you watch it.  I think it's a great cast, but one that is mostly miscast or stuck in under-developed roles.  And turning such a dark tale into one with a happy ending just doesn't work for me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...